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Chiropractor in Locust, NJ

Chiropractor Locust, NJ

What is Chiropractic Care?

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Chiropractic care is a drug-free, non-invasive approach to overall wellness and healing that focuses on correcting issues with your musculoskeletal system. When performed by a licensed chiropractor, it can alleviate and even eliminate common problems such as:

  • Back Pain
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Headaches
  • Sciatica
  • Knee Pain
  • Automobile Injuries
  • Sports Injuries
  • Arthritis
  • Body Aches

To treat your conditions and help reduce your pain, chiropractors use time-tested, hands-on techniques to adjust your spine, neck, back, and other joints throughout your body to restore proper function, mobility, and alignment. Once your body is in proper alignment, it functions optimally, leading to improved overall wellness and health.

Unlike some sports rehab clinics in The Garden State, chiropractors from NJ Sports Spine & Wellness work with you one-on-one to develop a personalized treatment plan that addresses your specific goals and needs relating to your pain and ability to live a normal life. Because our team takes a holistic approach to healthcare, we cover all aspects of your health and wellness when developing your chiropractic treatment plan. That way, we increase your chances of living a fulfilling life free of pain and worry about throwing your back out.

 Back Pain Relief Locust, NJ

What are the Benefits of Seeing a Chiropractor in Locust, NJ?

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Seeing a chiropractor can quite literally change your life for the better. According to the American Chiropractic Association, in general, chiropractic therapy is a more effective solution for back pain than other treatments like addictive pain pills, surgeries, and yoga. When combined with services like physical therapy, occupational therapy, and acupuncture, chiropractic care may be the key you need to open the door to a pain-free life.

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Some of the many benefits of seeing a reliable, licensed chiropractor include the following:

 Lower Back Pain Locust, NJ

Relief from Back Pain

Perhaps the most obvious reason to make an appointment with a chiropractor is for back pain relief. Some people only need to see a chiropractor when they have occasional back pain, such as when they wake up in the morning. Others, such as those who have been in serious car accidents, need regular chiropractic adjustments and therapies, which are often supplemented with techniques like physical therapy and acupuncture.

There are many causes of back pain that range from advanced conditions like having sciatica and herniated discs to everyday issues like poor posture and sleeping in a harmful position. Your chiropractor's job is to pinpoint the cause(s) of your back pain and build a customized plan to address your musculoskeletal conditions. Once that happens, pain relief follows shortly after.

At New Jersey Sports Spine & Wellness, we craft personalized chiropractic plans for every patient we treat, with the goal of avoiding harmful surgeries and addictive medicines.

Neck Pain Locust, NJ

Relief from Headaches

If you've never experienced a headache in your life, you're exceedingly rare. Just about every American will suffer from a headache at some point or another. For some, headaches only happen occasionally and are not much more than an annoyance. For others, headaches evolve into crippling migraines that can affect quality of life, ability to work, and much more.

If you find yourself digging into a bottle of Aspirin or something stronger when you have a headache, it might be time to visit an NJSSW chiropractor.

Knee Pain Locust, NJ

Improved Sleep

Do you wake up in the morning feeling like you didn't sleep a wink the previous night? Do you have to take sleep aides like Ambien in order to drift off to dreamland? If you have chronic back pain, getting a full night's rest is easier said than done. From misaligned spines to improper sleeping posture, your chiropractor in Locust can use manipulation therapy and other techniques to boost blood flow and align your vertebrae, so your body can heal itself and help you rest better.

Relief For Sciatica Locust, NJ

Reduced Anxiety and Stress

One of the best things about seeing your chiropractor is that when your session is over, you often feel great. The pain relief feels phenomenal. When you're not in pain, you have a more positive outlook on life, and often enjoy better sleep, blood pressure, and even sexual relations. It makes sense, then, that chiropractic care has been shown to help reduce stress and anxiety, which promotes relaxation and improved mental health.

Pain And Spine Management Locust, NJ

Athletic Performance

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we work with a long list of athletes who suffer from sports injuries and other problems that can manifest from being active. For professional athletes, having a trustworthy chiropractor to care for them is needed for their careers. But you don't have to be a pro athlete to benefit from chiropractic care. Ordinary people that enjoy active lifestyles can reap tremendous rewards through chiropractic care, such as improved range of motion and relief from compressed discs.

Whether you enjoy impromptu games of tag football or simply want to play with your kids, seeing a chiropractor can help you be healthy and active without fighting back, neck, and joint pain. That's especially true when chiropractic therapy is used in conjunction with acupuncture, physical therapy, or occupational therapy.ies and addictive medicines.

Back Treatment Locust, NJ

Common Chiropractic Techniques

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Your NJ Sports Spine & Wellness chiropractor in Locust may use a range of techniques to restore function and alignment in your body. Some of the most common techniques our chiropractors use include:

  • Mobilization: This chiropractic strategy uses gentle movements to help restore joint functionality and proper spinal alignment.
  • Manipulation: Spinal manipulation uses controlled force and gravity to correct spinal issues and restore healthy alignment.
  • Electrical Stimulation: With this therapy, electrical currents are used to stimulate your muscles and help heal injuries faster.
  • Soft Tissue Therapy: This type of massage and other hands-on techniques relieve muscle tension while providing pain relief and promoting soft tissue health.
  • Trigger Point Therapy: With this therapy, the targeted use of pressure is used to release tension and improve functionality across specific areas of your body.
  • Ultrasounds: High-frequency sound waves can break up plaque and help stimulate your body's natural healing processes for injuries and wounds.

Reclaim Your Active Life with Physical Therapy and Chiropractic Care

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Life has a habit of being unexpected. Sure, some surprises only hurt your bank account, like last-minute renovations in your home. But severe incidents, like car accidents, can inflict physical injuries that cause you long-term pain. These problems, like neck and back injuries, affect many Americans daily. Even worse, many hardworking people turn to risky surgeries and addictive pain medications, only to find themselves deep in a hole that seems impossible to get out of.

If you suffer from serious range-of-motion issues or you're in chronic pain, it's important to know that you have treatment choices. You don't have to put your health at risk to relieve your pain. One of the most successful non-invasive treatments offered for pain is physical therapy. The main goal of physical therapy is to restore movement and function to patients affected by illness, injury, or disability.

Physical therapists work with patients of all ages and abilities, from children to elderly adults, to help them overcome physical limitations and improve their quality of life. At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, our physical therapists help treat a wide range of conditions, from neck pain and spinal cord injuries to back pain and arthritis.

Once our PTs have made headway, they will often use our chiropractic therapy to provide the patient with more relief. Having the option of both chiropractic and physical therapy is often very effective, because your chiropractor in Locust can address nerve irritation and joint dysfunction while your physical therapist helps retrain your musculoskeletal system, allowing your body to heal faster.

Some of the biggest benefits of using physical therapy along with chiropractic care include:

  • Restoring Mobility After Injury, Surgery, or Illness
  • Developing Flexibility and Strength for Physical Activities
  • Safe Relief from Chronic Pain
  • Improved Spine and Joint Health
  • Enhanced Knowledge of Your Body and How to Prevent Injuries
Herniated Disk Treatment Locust, NJ
Back Pain Specialist Near Me Locust, NJ

Engage in Activities of Daily Living with Occupational Therapy and Chiropractic Therapy

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Occupational therapy, or OT, is to help patients of all ages and abilities engage in activities of daily living, or ADL. Often, that means helping patients reclaim the ability to continue working, going to school, accomplishing day-to-day tasks, or other activities common to daily living.

Occupational therapy can benefit individuals going through many conditions, such as traumatic brain injuries, strokes, spinal cord injuries, autism spectrum disorders, developmental delays, and chronic pain. The end goal of occupational therapy is to help patients achieve the maximum level of independence and participation in their daily lives. If pain, discomfort, weakness, fatigue, or fear prevent you from participating in activities you love, an OT from NJ Sports Spine & Wellness could become the MVP of your wellness journey.

To give our patients the most complete pain relief and recovery options, our doctors and practitioners will often lean on the expertise of both a physical therapist and a chiropractor in Locust. By working together, your PT, OT, and chiropractor can provide you with a comprehensive approach to total-body functionality, from your spine and joints to your mind and range of motion.

Some of the most common benefits of using OT with chiropractic care include:

  • Chronic Pain Relief
  • Improvement of Both Physical and Mental, Emotional, or Developmental Disabilities
  • Improved Development of Fine Motor Skills
  • Better Spine and Musculoskeletal Health
  • Help with Sensory Processing Disorders
  • Much More
Back Pain Doctor Near Me Locust, NJ

Boost Self-Healing Processes with Acupuncture and Chiropractic Care

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Acupuncture boosts your body's functions and helps improve its ability to heal through anatomic site stimulation - usually called acupuncture points or acupoints. To stimulate these points, acupuncturists at NJ Sports Spine & Wellness insert fine, sterile needles into your skin. Most patients don't feel any pain as needles are applied. Typically, needles are left in the skin up to 30 minutes. After your session, it's normal to feel incredibly relaxed.

While some practitioners still adhere to traditional philosophies, modern acupuncturists take an integrative approach to the therapy. Today, professional acupuncturists use these techniques to stimulate your body's natural healing and pain-fighting processes. When coupled with personalized care from a chiropractor in Locust as well as physical or occupational therapy, you can find real relief from the physical and emotional roadblocks holding you back. Some of the most reported benefits of acupuncture treatment include:

  • Back, Neck, and General Pain Relief
  • Improved Digestion and Relief from IBS and Acid Reflux
  • Relief from Menstrual Cramps
  • Treatment for Allergies and Asthma
  • Enhanced Blood Flow
  • Much More

During an acupuncture session, you may feel a slight sensation of warmth or tingling at the needle's site of insertion. Generally speaking, acupuncture is painless and perfectly safe for you to consider. In fact, many practitioners and doctors recommend combining acupuncture with other treatment options like chiropractic adjustments.

Though acupuncture and chiropractic therapies come from different origins, both include non-invasive, holistic, and gentle approaches that don't require drugs to work. They also both facilitate total-body healing by addressing the underlying causes of your symptoms - not just the symptoms themselves.

Because acupuncture is known to release endorphins and improve blood flow, having a session prior to a chiropractic adjustment can be very beneficial. That's because, after acupuncture, your muscles are less stiff, more relaxed, and easier to adjust effectively. Over time, as you combine acupuncture and chiropractic therapy, you'll benefit from less inflammation and less pain as you heal from injuries or musculoskeletal conditions. That same truth applies to patients who undergo serious chiropractic adjustments.

Trust the NJ Sports Spine & Wellness Difference

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At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, our staff consists of licensed and highly-trained professionals, including specialists focusing on:

  • Pain Management
  • Sports Medicine
  • Chiropractic Therapy
  • Physical Therapy
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Acupuncture

Contact Us

phone-number732-316-5895

Every member of our team believes that the path to wellness and a pain-free life begins with customized treatment plans that cater to your needs and body. Unlike some chiropractors in Locust, we do not treat on-the-surface symptoms with one-size-fits-all therapies. We do not rely on powerful pain medications to mask your pain or invasive surgeries that require weeks of recovery. Instead, we address the root causes of your pain so that we can help you live the happy, healthy life you're craving.

To achieve that goal, we'll conduct an in-depth evaluation to learn about your medical history. We'll also perform diagnostic tests and speak with you one-on-one to get a better sense of your needs. From there, we'll recommend the therapies that can give you a new lease on life and be there for every milestone you hit.

If you're fed up of living with the limits of pain and lack of mobility, we're here to help you break free. Contact our office today to get started.

 Back Pain Relief Locust, NJ

Latest News in Locust, NJ

Essex County Executive DiVincenzo Announces the Replacement of the Locust Avenue Bridge in Bloomfield is Complete

Bloomfield, NJ – On Thursday, January 12th, Essex County Executive Joseph N. DiVincenzo, Jr. announced that the project to replace the Locust Avenue Bridge in Bloomfield with a new structure has been completed. The bridge modernization was included in a larger project to replace four culverts and bridges throughout Essex County. It is part of the County Executive’s ongoing initiative to modernize infrastructure and enhance safety for pedestrians and motorists.“Residents rely on our County bridges and roads to get to ...

Bloomfield, NJ – On Thursday, January 12th, Essex County Executive Joseph N. DiVincenzo, Jr. announced that the project to replace the Locust Avenue Bridge in Bloomfield with a new structure has been completed. The bridge modernization was included in a larger project to replace four culverts and bridges throughout Essex County. It is part of the County Executive’s ongoing initiative to modernize infrastructure and enhance safety for pedestrians and motorists.

“Residents rely on our County bridges and roads to get to work, go to school and travel about their daily routines. It has been my ongoing priority to ensure that our infrastructure is up-to-date, able to meet the growing demands of our community and provide the safest passage for pedestrians and motorists,” DiVincenzo said.

“Thank you for what you invest in our township and keeping our infrastructure up to date. It makes an impact on the community,” Commissioner Vice President Carlos Pomares, who is from Bloomfield, said. “This is a wonderful improvement and another terrific job,” Commissioner Patricia Sebold said.

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“Maintaining our infrastructure is incredibly important to the vitality of our community. We appreciate projects like these by the County to improve our quality of life,” said Bloomfield Mayor Mike Venezia, who was joined by Councilman Rich Rockwell.

The original Locust Avenue Bridge was a two-lane bridge that crossed over Lloyd Brook and was originally built in 1930 and rehabilitated in 1975. The old bridge was in a deteriorating condition and exhibited substantial rust. The 30-foot-wide bridge was replaced with a similarly constructed structure.

Other bridges included in the initiative are the Mitchell Street Culvert on Mitchell Street in Orange, Freeman Street Culvert over Foulerton’s Brook in Roseland and Marion Avenue Culvert over a tributary of the West Branch of the Rahway River in Millburn in Millburn.

The Locust Avenue Bridge, Mitchell Street Culvert, Marion Avenue Culvert and Freeman Street Culvert were packaged together in the same project. French and Parrello was awarded a professional services contract to design the improvements to the four culverts and provide construction inspection services on the project. A publicly bid contract for $2,878,204 was awarded to Grade Construction from Paterson to replace the four culverts. The culvert improvements were funded with a grant from the NJ Department of Transportation Local Aid Program.

Jersey Cicadas Emerge, but They're a Far Cry From Biblical Locusts

This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them.Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems; we are continuing to work to improve these archived versions.It may be the season of Passover, when the biblical plague of locusts is remembered, but the one‐and‐a‐half‐inch‐long insects now emerging from...

This is a digitized version of an article from The Times’s print archive, before the start of online publication in 1996. To preserve these articles as they originally appeared, The Times does not alter, edit or update them.

Occasionally the digitization process introduces transcription errors or other problems; we are continuing to work to improve these archived versions.

It may be the season of Passover, when the biblical plague of locusts is remembered, but the one‐and‐a‐half‐inch‐long insects now emerging from narrow holes in some New Jersey lawns, though locustlike, are hardly of biblical proportions.

Often mislabeled “17‐year locusts,” they are actually periodic cicadas. Although they can sing loudly like their biblical counterparts in the book of Exodus, they will neither “cover the face of the earth” nor “eat every tree which groweth.” At the most, entomologists say, the cicadas will destroy the twigs at the tips of branches of some deciduous trees.

“People get all excited, but frankly I can't get excited over them,” said Stephen Bachelder, a Union County agricul‐ tural agent with the New Jersey Cooperat ive Extension Service of Cook College at Rutgers University. “There are plenty of insect‐eating birds, such as robins, blue jays and wood thrushes, that love locusts and will eat them before they start breeding.”

Sap‐Sucking Underground

Periodic cicadas breed every 13 or 17 years, meanwhile living quietly underground and sucking insignificant amounts of sap from the roots of trees. After their dormant period, they burrow their way up through the ground and emerge during the night. Then they attach themselves to the bark of trees, where they shed their hard exoskeletons, develop a new surface and grow wings.

During the day, the males screech loud mating song, which, according to one theory, is why they are sometimes called locusts. That theory holds that, in 1613, Pilgrims mistook the wail of healthy brood for the sound of crop‐devouring locusts of the biblical sort.

The little damage that cicadas do cause occurs when the females lay their eggs on tree branches. The females have a sawlike egg‐laying device — the ovipositor—with which they chisel a small spot on twigs where they deposit their eggs. The twigs later brown and die outward from that point.

The brood of cicadas now emerging in New Jersey is early — usually cicadas wait until the warmer months of June, July and August — and, according to Mr. Bachelder, it is .a brood that last appeared in 1962, when it affected the Fanwood, Scotch Plains and Westfield areas of New Jersey.

Mr. Bachelder said that the brood has also appeared in southeastern New York, Connecticut, Maryland and North Carolina, but that New Jersey was the only place where cicadas had been reported this year. A Connecticut entomologist does not expect any in that state, but Long Island might get a brood.

“According to theory we're due for them some time in June or July,” said Joseph Savage, an entomologist and county agent of agriculture at the Nassau County Cooperative Extension Service.

Berkeley Heights Planners Approve 196-Unit Age-Restricted Development at 100 Locust Ave.

Waiting for the board attorney to compile the list of conditions before the vote on the motion to approve the preliminary and final site plan of Woodcrest at Berkeley Heights.Woodcrest at Berkeley Heights an age-restricted development for people 55 and older was approved as part of the township's affordable housing settlement.Photo Credit: Barbara RyboltLocust Avenue, Berkeley Heights, is on the right of this rendering. Building A is on the left, Building B on the right. Photo ...

Waiting for the board attorney to compile the list of conditions before the vote on the motion to approve the preliminary and final site plan of Woodcrest at Berkeley Heights.

Woodcrest at Berkeley Heights an age-restricted development for people 55 and older was approved as part of the township's affordable housing settlement.Photo Credit: Barbara Rybolt

Locust Avenue, Berkeley Heights, is on the right of this rendering. Building A is on the left, Building B on the right. Photo Credit: Barbara Rybolt

Photo Credit: Barbara Rybolt

Woodcrest at Berkeley Heights.Photo Credit: Barbara Rybolt

Woodcrest at Berkeley HeightsPhoto Credit: Barbara Rybolt

Photo Credit: Barbara Rybolt

Woodcrest at Berkeley Heights Planning Board meeting.Photo Credit: Barbara Rybolt

Photo Credit: Barbara Rybolt

Woodcrest at Berkeley Heights an age-restricted development for people 55 and older was approved as part of the township's affordable housing settlement.Photo Credit: Barbara Rybolt

By Barbara Rybolt

BERKELEY HEIGHTS, NJ – Another development included in the township’s court-approved affordable housing settlement has received preliminary and final site plan approval from the planning board.

Wednesday, June 20, the board voted to approve the all rental, 196-unit age-restricted development “Woodcrest at Berkeley Heights,” 100 Locust Ave.

Whether there will be brick pavers or stamped concrete sidewalks has yet to be determined, along with other relatively minor issues.

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What is sure is there will be a light at Locust/Hamilton and Snyder avenues and the application to the NJ Department of Transportation for that light could be made within a few weeks. Also sure is no one under the age of 19 will be permitted to live in these units, they can, however, pay short visits.

The developer of the property, Berkeley Developer’s LLC, was represented at the meeting by one of its principals, Tony DiGiovanni.

The board heard testimony from the applicants experts on the how the site plan conformed with the plans contained in the Redevelopment Agreement.

Architect Avelino Martinez of Black Bird group, described the details of the project. There will be two buildings, Building A, at the far end of the property, away from Locust Avenue, and Building B which will be at the front of the property. The buildings will essentially be at right-angles to one another, with a club house or recreation center for all the residents located in Building A. Outside the club house entrance, there will be a porch overlooking a common area featuring patios, porches, decks and a gazebo connected by sidewalks between the two buildings.

Building A will have 109 units, consisting of 14 one-bedroom and 78 two-bedroom market rate apartments, and 17 affordable one-bedroom units, distributed throughout the building.

Building B will have 87 units, consisting of 18 one-bedroom and 57 two-bedroom market rate units and 12 affordable one-bedroom units.

In each building, the one-bedroom market rate apartments will average about 950-square-feet, the two-bedroom units 1,400 square feet.

Martinez called the exterior style of the building “suburban architecture” which features a muted color pallet of various shades of brown, white trim and stone on certain facades.

The majority of the parking will be in garages under the two buildings, with one entrance to each garage. Building A will have 186 parking spaces and Building B, 121 parking spaces in the garage. There will also be 79 surface spaces for a total of 386 parking spaces on the site, Martinez said. The garages will be made of non-combustible materials, the upper floors of “fire resistant wood frame construction,” and the building will have a sprinkler system, Martinez said. Each building will also have an emergency generator and the mechanicals will be on the roof and not visible to the public.

The property slopes to the rear, so the elevation on Building A at the rear of the building is four stories and three stories at the front.

When construction begins, it will start with Building A, then Building B will be phased in – possibly after three months. Building A will be occupied first, followed by Building B. There will be a separate construction entrance to the property, to keep traffic separated once Building A is occupied, the architect said. Once construction is started, it will take 15-18 months to finish Building A, and a total of two years from start to finish of the project.

Engineer Mike Junghans described the property, pointing out the property slopes toward the NJ Transit railroad tracks in the back. There is also an electrical substation adjacent to the tracks. The existing drive and wooded area along Locust Avenue will be maintained and wetlands in the back of the property will be undisturbed.

In answer to a question about the parking spaces and “tandem parking” in some areas, Junghans said, “every space under the buildings are assigned,” exterior parking spaces are not assigned. The tandem parking spots will be assigned to the same apartment and the residents will have keys for all their vehicles and be able to switch cars, as needed, he said.

Board member Kevin Hall questioned a recommendation by Junghans to drop the brick pavers agreed to in the original settlement agreement in favor of a more “safe” choice of an appropriately colored concrete sidewalk with the paver pattern stamped into the surface. Junghans said, “It is durable and the product is less susceptible to settling,” which creates a tripping hazard for older people. He also argued in favor of concrete sidewalks next to the parking spaces, because during the winter, the maintenance of the parking lot and sidewalks can damage pavers. He also recommended changing the color from an agreed upon “fire engine red,” to a brownish color more in keeping with the more subdued hue of the exterior of the buildings

Hall said, “This is a significant departure from the Redevelopment Agreement.”

Board member Jeanne Kingsley agreed, “We negotiated hard” on this project and its requirements such as pavers, not concrete sidewalks are ”half the reason we did PILOTs” with the developers. “I am uncomfortable giving up on pavers,” she said.

The developers also wanted to eliminate a “sidewalk to nowhere” along the Locust Avenue side of their property. There is a crosswalk from the Woodcrest at Berkeley Heights, across Locust to the yet-to-be-built YMCA and the existing outdoor swimming pool.

Kingsley urged the board to not give up on the sidewalks.

See the complete meeting here on LiveStream.

Board member and Mayor Robert Woodruff agreed, “t’s important to stick to what was agreed to” in the Redevelopment Agreement."

Kingsley said on Tuesday, the council will take up a “Complete Streets” measure that would require sidewalks on all new applications, to “make Berkeley Heights a more walkable community.” To back off from the sidewalk requirement only five days before the council votes on the measure would set a precedent for other developers, she said.

Other details in the agreement include that there will be no left turns from Woodcrest onto Locust Avenue. There will, however, be a traffic light installed by the developers of that property at the corner of Locust/Hamilton and Snyder avenues. Locust Avenue becomes Hamilton Avenue after it crosses Snyder Avenue.

The board approved the application with a list of conditions, all of which will be included in the final resolution during the board’s July meeting. Experts from the township and developer will address those conditions in meetings and determine how they will be met.

Obituaries in Neptune, NJ | Asbury Park Press

Loving Father, Writer, OutdoorsmanStephen Clarke Ferber, 86, of Palm Beach Gardens, Florida (formerly Locust, New Jersey), passed away peacefully on January 18, 2024, surrounded by his loving family.Steve was born on May 8th, 1937, to Pauline and Alvin Ferber in Lakewood, New Jersey. His father’s family had been longtime residents, builders, and business owners in the township. The Strand Theater remains, built for the Ferber Amusement Company, opening in 1922. It stands today as a Registered Historic Place in New Jersey....

Loving Father, Writer, Outdoorsman

Stephen Clarke Ferber, 86, of Palm Beach Gardens, Florida (formerly Locust, New Jersey), passed away peacefully on January 18, 2024, surrounded by his loving family.

Steve was born on May 8th, 1937, to Pauline and Alvin Ferber in Lakewood, New Jersey. His father’s family had been longtime residents, builders, and business owners in the township. The Strand Theater remains, built for the Ferber Amusement Company, opening in 1922. It stands today as a Registered Historic Place in New Jersey.

Steve graduated from Lakewood High School in 1955 then studied Biology and English at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Teaneck. After graduating in 1960, he went to Officer Candidate School before being stationed in San Diego on an attack transport as a Navigator.

While in San Diego, Stephen became involved with the Navy’s shooting teams and won the National Service Pistol Championship in 1966.

After Stephen left the Navy Reserves, he worked for Upjohn Pharmaceuticals in New Jersey marketing their products. Steve then became an editor for a medical journal, Medical Insight. Later, he moved to Argosy magazine in NYC as an outdoor editor while prolifically freelance writing and contributing to various publications.

Steve became a publisher in 1974 with the idea to form Aqua-Field Publishing, Inc. The company started in his Manhattan apartment, moved to Madison Avenue then down to Point Pleasant eventually landing in Tinton Falls, NJ. Aqua-Field closed its doors in 2000 before publishing hundreds of mostly annual or bi-annual high-caliber special interest newsstand magazines for dozens of clients (Ithaca Gun Co., Remington Arms Co., Titleist, 3M, Burpee Seed Company, Sears, and more). His novel publishing idea would facilitate rapid awareness of clients’ products by advertising in other (non-competing) Aqua-Field publications. Some of the titles were Fly Fishing Quarterly, Browning Deer Hunting, Coleman Camping Annual, Spalding Playing Your Best Golf, Burpee Home Gardener and ScubaPro Diving & Snorkeling.

In 1976, he married his beloved wife, Sally, and together they had a daughter, Sara.

Throughout Stephen’s life, he remained very active in the outdoorsman arena - fly and deep-sea fishing, competitive shooting, and hunting all over the world including several trips to Africa where a “record book” shot of a Cape Buffalo was placed.

Predeceasing Stephen is his beloved wife, Sally (2004); brother, Michael (1989); mother, Pauline (1977); father, Alvin (1955) and his first wife, Sheila (2012).

Surviving Stephen are his three devoted daughters and adoring grandchildren: Cheryl Page (Garth) and daughter, Olivia of Mill Valley, California; Jennifer and Austen Ferber of Petaluma, California, and Sara Roybal (John) and Stephen of San Diego, California. Steve also leaves behind his cousins, Patricia Casey and family of Saint James, NY; brother-in-law, Jack Dickinson (Myriam) and niece, Samantha of Bloomington, Minnesota.

Steve leaves behind many friends from The Rumson Country Club, Sea Bright Beach Club, the Philadelphia Gun Club, Palm Beach Gardens, the Campfire Club of America, the Atlantic Indians, the Metropolitan Press Association, the Overseas Press Club, and more.

There will be a private graveside service in Lakewood, NJ on Thursday, January 25, 2024.

All friends, who knew and loved Steve are welcome to join us at the Rumson Country Club River House directly following the service on Thursday, January 25, from 3:00 to 5:00 PM.

In place of flowers, Steve and his family would ask instead for donations to be made to the Disabled American Veterans

In New Jersey, a Park’s Spring Water Is Prized. Polluted, Too.

MILLBURN, N.J. In a densely populated place, people prize their slivers of nature and links to a pastoral past. Which might explain why David Giannakopoulos disregarded the signs, rounded the fence, stuck his head under a rock and took a drink.Among the trees here in the South Mountain Reservation, for longer than anyone can remember, water has burbled out of the rocks and people have stopped for a gulp. The same is true in c...

MILLBURN, N.J. In a densely populated place, people prize their slivers of nature and links to a pastoral past. Which might explain why David Giannakopoulos disregarded the signs, rounded the fence, stuck his head under a rock and took a drink.

Among the trees here in the South Mountain Reservation, for longer than anyone can remember, water has burbled out of the rocks and people have stopped for a gulp. The same is true in countless places, but this is one of those springs that became a local treasure, with fans who came to fill buckets and swore that the water was better-tasting, healthier or just more natural than what they could get from their suburban taps.

But last December, the State Department of Environmental Protection tested the spring, in the Locust Grove section at the southern end of the reservation, a county park, and found bacteria from animal feces. The Essex County Department of Parks posted signs saying “unsafe for human consumption.”

That did not deter devotees like Mr. Giannakopoulos, a 40-year-old college student who lives in West Orange. Pointing to his 14-year-old dog, Mango, Mr. Giannakopoulos said, “Drinking that water, I think it’s helped her live this long. There’s nothing wrong with this water.”

The first signs posted on the spring were quickly torn down. Park workers replaced the signs and pushed boulders onto the spot, but someone rolled them away. The county hired a contractor to erect a chain-link fence around the spring, with a locked gate, and someone took the gate off its hinges.

The gate was repaired, and it remains securely closed with not one padlock but two. But about a month ago, someone cut away one of the fence’s four sides, and it is still missing; bits of chain link are scattered on the trail where hikers, dog walkers and picnickers pass a few feet away.

Some of these hikers, dog walkers and picnickers still happily drink from the small pipe that was installed long ago to channel water out of the rocks, despite three signs warning them not to. And they all seem to have stories of friends and neighbors who have consumed the water for decades without any ill effect.

“I used to come here with a bottle, and I’d have to wait in line,” said Jim Fittin, who admitted that he had taken a sip or two since the signs went up. “There’s not as many people now, but some of the people who come here on a regular basis, they weren’t going to let anything stop them.”

It was the spring’s popularity that led the state to test it and the county to fence it; ordinarily, the authorities do not worry about such sources because they are not considered part of the drinking water supply. But animal waste is always a potential threat in untreated ponds and streams and the reason generations of Boy Scout leaders have warned their charges not to drink at Locust Grove and countless similar spots.

“I haven’t touched that water in 25 years,” said Bruce DeVita, the chief project coordinator for the Parks Department. “I don’t drink water that comes out of the ground.”

But among people who recently passed through Locust Grove multiple times, the consensus was that the bacteria could not be much of a threat or no worse than the chemicals found in tap water. “You can’t come to the woods and not have bacteria on your hands,” noted Elizabeth Ebinger.

South Mountain Reservation, a sea of green covering 2,047 acres, almost two and a half times the size of Central Park, includes parts of Millburn, West Orange and Maplewood. The park envelops visitors, obscuring all visible signs of being in the nation’s largest metropolitan area.

It is a cherished illusion, but still an illusion. No part of the park is even three-quarters of a mile away from a suburban neighborhood; it contains roads, the ruins of an old factory and a reservoir for the city of Orange. Just a few hundred yards away from the Locust Grove spring lie a library, a bank and a New Jersey Transit train station.

Still, “It feels like you’re out in the forest like it used to be, out in nature,” Mr. Giannakopoulos said. “I like that.”

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