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Chiropractor in Keasbey, NJ

Chiropractor Keasbey, NJ

What is Chiropractic Care?

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Chiropractic care is a drug-free, non-invasive approach to overall wellness and healing that focuses on correcting issues with your musculoskeletal system. When performed by a licensed chiropractor, it can alleviate and even eliminate common problems such as:

  • Back Pain
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Headaches
  • Sciatica
  • Knee Pain
  • Automobile Injuries
  • Sports Injuries
  • Arthritis
  • Body Aches

To treat your conditions and help reduce your pain, chiropractors use time-tested, hands-on techniques to adjust your spine, neck, back, and other joints throughout your body to restore proper function, mobility, and alignment. Once your body is in proper alignment, it functions optimally, leading to improved overall wellness and health.

Unlike some sports rehab clinics in The Garden State, chiropractors from NJ Sports Spine & Wellness work with you one-on-one to develop a personalized treatment plan that addresses your specific goals and needs relating to your pain and ability to live a normal life. Because our team takes a holistic approach to healthcare, we cover all aspects of your health and wellness when developing your chiropractic treatment plan. That way, we increase your chances of living a fulfilling life free of pain and worry about throwing your back out.

 Back Pain Relief Keasbey, NJ

What are the Benefits of Seeing a Chiropractor in Keasbey, NJ?

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Seeing a chiropractor can quite literally change your life for the better. According to the American Chiropractic Association, in general, chiropractic therapy is a more effective solution for back pain than other treatments like addictive pain pills, surgeries, and yoga. When combined with services like physical therapy, occupational therapy, and acupuncture, chiropractic care may be the key you need to open the door to a pain-free life.

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Some of the many benefits of seeing a reliable, licensed chiropractor include the following:

 Lower Back Pain Keasbey, NJ

Relief from Back Pain

Perhaps the most obvious reason to make an appointment with a chiropractor is for back pain relief. Some people only need to see a chiropractor when they have occasional back pain, such as when they wake up in the morning. Others, such as those who have been in serious car accidents, need regular chiropractic adjustments and therapies, which are often supplemented with techniques like physical therapy and acupuncture.

There are many causes of back pain that range from advanced conditions like having sciatica and herniated discs to everyday issues like poor posture and sleeping in a harmful position. Your chiropractor's job is to pinpoint the cause(s) of your back pain and build a customized plan to address your musculoskeletal conditions. Once that happens, pain relief follows shortly after.

At New Jersey Sports Spine & Wellness, we craft personalized chiropractic plans for every patient we treat, with the goal of avoiding harmful surgeries and addictive medicines.

Neck Pain Keasbey, NJ

Relief from Headaches

If you've never experienced a headache in your life, you're exceedingly rare. Just about every American will suffer from a headache at some point or another. For some, headaches only happen occasionally and are not much more than an annoyance. For others, headaches evolve into crippling migraines that can affect quality of life, ability to work, and much more.

If you find yourself digging into a bottle of Aspirin or something stronger when you have a headache, it might be time to visit an NJSSW chiropractor.

Knee Pain Keasbey, NJ

Improved Sleep

Do you wake up in the morning feeling like you didn't sleep a wink the previous night? Do you have to take sleep aides like Ambien in order to drift off to dreamland? If you have chronic back pain, getting a full night's rest is easier said than done. From misaligned spines to improper sleeping posture, your chiropractor in Keasbey can use manipulation therapy and other techniques to boost blood flow and align your vertebrae, so your body can heal itself and help you rest better.

Relief For Sciatica Keasbey, NJ

Reduced Anxiety and Stress

One of the best things about seeing your chiropractor is that when your session is over, you often feel great. The pain relief feels phenomenal. When you're not in pain, you have a more positive outlook on life, and often enjoy better sleep, blood pressure, and even sexual relations. It makes sense, then, that chiropractic care has been shown to help reduce stress and anxiety, which promotes relaxation and improved mental health.

Pain And Spine Management Keasbey, NJ

Athletic Performance

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we work with a long list of athletes who suffer from sports injuries and other problems that can manifest from being active. For professional athletes, having a trustworthy chiropractor to care for them is needed for their careers. But you don't have to be a pro athlete to benefit from chiropractic care. Ordinary people that enjoy active lifestyles can reap tremendous rewards through chiropractic care, such as improved range of motion and relief from compressed discs.

Whether you enjoy impromptu games of tag football or simply want to play with your kids, seeing a chiropractor can help you be healthy and active without fighting back, neck, and joint pain. That's especially true when chiropractic therapy is used in conjunction with acupuncture, physical therapy, or occupational therapy.ies and addictive medicines.

Back Treatment Keasbey, NJ

Common Chiropractic Techniques

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Your NJ Sports Spine & Wellness chiropractor in Keasbey may use a range of techniques to restore function and alignment in your body. Some of the most common techniques our chiropractors use include:

  • Mobilization: This chiropractic strategy uses gentle movements to help restore joint functionality and proper spinal alignment.
  • Manipulation: Spinal manipulation uses controlled force and gravity to correct spinal issues and restore healthy alignment.
  • Electrical Stimulation: With this therapy, electrical currents are used to stimulate your muscles and help heal injuries faster.
  • Soft Tissue Therapy: This type of massage and other hands-on techniques relieve muscle tension while providing pain relief and promoting soft tissue health.
  • Trigger Point Therapy: With this therapy, the targeted use of pressure is used to release tension and improve functionality across specific areas of your body.
  • Ultrasounds: High-frequency sound waves can break up plaque and help stimulate your body's natural healing processes for injuries and wounds.

Reclaim Your Active Life with Physical Therapy and Chiropractic Care

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Life has a habit of being unexpected. Sure, some surprises only hurt your bank account, like last-minute renovations in your home. But severe incidents, like car accidents, can inflict physical injuries that cause you long-term pain. These problems, like neck and back injuries, affect many Americans daily. Even worse, many hardworking people turn to risky surgeries and addictive pain medications, only to find themselves deep in a hole that seems impossible to get out of.

If you suffer from serious range-of-motion issues or you're in chronic pain, it's important to know that you have treatment choices. You don't have to put your health at risk to relieve your pain. One of the most successful non-invasive treatments offered for pain is physical therapy. The main goal of physical therapy is to restore movement and function to patients affected by illness, injury, or disability.

Physical therapists work with patients of all ages and abilities, from children to elderly adults, to help them overcome physical limitations and improve their quality of life. At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, our physical therapists help treat a wide range of conditions, from neck pain and spinal cord injuries to back pain and arthritis.

Once our PTs have made headway, they will often use our chiropractic therapy to provide the patient with more relief. Having the option of both chiropractic and physical therapy is often very effective, because your chiropractor in Keasbey can address nerve irritation and joint dysfunction while your physical therapist helps retrain your musculoskeletal system, allowing your body to heal faster.

Some of the biggest benefits of using physical therapy along with chiropractic care include:

  • Restoring Mobility After Injury, Surgery, or Illness
  • Developing Flexibility and Strength for Physical Activities
  • Safe Relief from Chronic Pain
  • Improved Spine and Joint Health
  • Enhanced Knowledge of Your Body and How to Prevent Injuries
Herniated Disk Treatment Keasbey, NJ
Back Pain Specialist Near Me Keasbey, NJ

Engage in Activities of Daily Living with Occupational Therapy and Chiropractic Therapy

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Occupational therapy, or OT, is to help patients of all ages and abilities engage in activities of daily living, or ADL. Often, that means helping patients reclaim the ability to continue working, going to school, accomplishing day-to-day tasks, or other activities common to daily living.

Occupational therapy can benefit individuals going through many conditions, such as traumatic brain injuries, strokes, spinal cord injuries, autism spectrum disorders, developmental delays, and chronic pain. The end goal of occupational therapy is to help patients achieve the maximum level of independence and participation in their daily lives. If pain, discomfort, weakness, fatigue, or fear prevent you from participating in activities you love, an OT from NJ Sports Spine & Wellness could become the MVP of your wellness journey.

To give our patients the most complete pain relief and recovery options, our doctors and practitioners will often lean on the expertise of both a physical therapist and a chiropractor in Keasbey. By working together, your PT, OT, and chiropractor can provide you with a comprehensive approach to total-body functionality, from your spine and joints to your mind and range of motion.

Some of the most common benefits of using OT with chiropractic care include:

  • Chronic Pain Relief
  • Improvement of Both Physical and Mental, Emotional, or Developmental Disabilities
  • Improved Development of Fine Motor Skills
  • Better Spine and Musculoskeletal Health
  • Help with Sensory Processing Disorders
  • Much More
Back Pain Doctor Near Me Keasbey, NJ

Boost Self-Healing Processes with Acupuncture and Chiropractic Care

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Acupuncture boosts your body's functions and helps improve its ability to heal through anatomic site stimulation - usually called acupuncture points or acupoints. To stimulate these points, acupuncturists at NJ Sports Spine & Wellness insert fine, sterile needles into your skin. Most patients don't feel any pain as needles are applied. Typically, needles are left in the skin up to 30 minutes. After your session, it's normal to feel incredibly relaxed.

While some practitioners still adhere to traditional philosophies, modern acupuncturists take an integrative approach to the therapy. Today, professional acupuncturists use these techniques to stimulate your body's natural healing and pain-fighting processes. When coupled with personalized care from a chiropractor in Keasbey as well as physical or occupational therapy, you can find real relief from the physical and emotional roadblocks holding you back. Some of the most reported benefits of acupuncture treatment include:

  • Back, Neck, and General Pain Relief
  • Improved Digestion and Relief from IBS and Acid Reflux
  • Relief from Menstrual Cramps
  • Treatment for Allergies and Asthma
  • Enhanced Blood Flow
  • Much More

During an acupuncture session, you may feel a slight sensation of warmth or tingling at the needle's site of insertion. Generally speaking, acupuncture is painless and perfectly safe for you to consider. In fact, many practitioners and doctors recommend combining acupuncture with other treatment options like chiropractic adjustments.

Though acupuncture and chiropractic therapies come from different origins, both include non-invasive, holistic, and gentle approaches that don't require drugs to work. They also both facilitate total-body healing by addressing the underlying causes of your symptoms - not just the symptoms themselves.

Because acupuncture is known to release endorphins and improve blood flow, having a session prior to a chiropractic adjustment can be very beneficial. That's because, after acupuncture, your muscles are less stiff, more relaxed, and easier to adjust effectively. Over time, as you combine acupuncture and chiropractic therapy, you'll benefit from less inflammation and less pain as you heal from injuries or musculoskeletal conditions. That same truth applies to patients who undergo serious chiropractic adjustments.

Trust the NJ Sports Spine & Wellness Difference

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At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, our staff consists of licensed and highly-trained professionals, including specialists focusing on:

  • Pain Management
  • Sports Medicine
  • Chiropractic Therapy
  • Physical Therapy
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Acupuncture

Contact Us

phone-number732-316-5895

Every member of our team believes that the path to wellness and a pain-free life begins with customized treatment plans that cater to your needs and body. Unlike some chiropractors in Keasbey, we do not treat on-the-surface symptoms with one-size-fits-all therapies. We do not rely on powerful pain medications to mask your pain or invasive surgeries that require weeks of recovery. Instead, we address the root causes of your pain so that we can help you live the happy, healthy life you're craving.

To achieve that goal, we'll conduct an in-depth evaluation to learn about your medical history. We'll also perform diagnostic tests and speak with you one-on-one to get a better sense of your needs. From there, we'll recommend the therapies that can give you a new lease on life and be there for every milestone you hit.

If you're fed up of living with the limits of pain and lack of mobility, we're here to help you break free. Contact our office today to get started.

 Back Pain Relief Keasbey, NJ

Latest News in Keasbey, NJ

3 New NJ Power Plants Coming, 2 Will Definitely Use Natural Gas

Despite opposition from many surrounding towns, three new power plants are poised to open, in Newark, Kearny and Woodbridge:Patch Staff|Updated Thu, Apr 21, 2022 at 9:51 am ETWOODBRIDGE, NJ — Three power plants are coming to New Jersey, proposed to open in Newark, Kearny and the Keasbey section of Woodbridge.NJ Transit wants to open the power plant in Kearny and the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission is pushing for the power plant in Newark.The Woodbridge power plant will be owned by a private compa...

Despite opposition from many surrounding towns, three new power plants are poised to open, in Newark, Kearny and Woodbridge:

Patch Staff

|Updated Thu, Apr 21, 2022 at 9:51 am ET

WOODBRIDGE, NJ — Three power plants are coming to New Jersey, proposed to open in Newark, Kearny and the Keasbey section of Woodbridge.

NJ Transit wants to open the power plant in Kearny and the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission is pushing for the power plant in Newark.

The Woodbridge power plant will be owned by a private company, Competitive Power Ventures, which is now owned by OPC Energy, a massive international energy conglomerate.

None of the plants have proposed opening dates yet, and there is considerable community push-back to all three being built. The Woodbridge plant will use fracked natural gas, which is natural gas obtained by fracking methods. However, NJ Transit has backed off a plan to use natural gas for its proposed plant in Kearny.

NJ Transit said it has "reimagined (this) project to maximize clean energy and renewables," but was not more specific on what renewable energy sources their plant will use.

Find out what's happening in Woodbridgewith free, real-time updates from Patch.

Similarly, the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission originally planned to use all natural gas, but now says they will use a mix of natural gas and a renewable fuel, with plans to use all renewable energy by 2030.

New Jersey environmental activists say Gov. Phil Murphy hasn't done enough to stop the plants from opening. Murphy's office did not respond for a request for comment for this article.

1. The Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission plant in Newark

The power plant will be located next to the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission's existing sewage treatment facility in the Ironbound section, at 600 Wilson Avenue in Newark. This is the largest sewage processing facility in the state.

The plant will be owned and operated by the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission, which is investing $180 million to build it. The Sewerage Commission said they desperately need a source of back-up power: In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, their sewage treatment facility in Newark flooded, spilling billions of gallons of raw sewage into the Passaic River. Since then, the Commission said it needs to build a plant to provide backup power to their wastewater treatment plant should the grid go down again.

A spokesperson for the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission previously told Patch that the facility would be powered by "the same natural gas that people all across Newark and New Jersey in general use to heat their homes and from which they also obtain electrical power. The plant will use state-of-the-art emission controls with negligible impact to the community."

But now, the Sewerage Commission says it has revised its plans and proposes to start operation of the plant with a mix of natural gas and a renewable fuel. The Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission anticipates full conversion to using a 100 percent renewable fuel by 2030.

The Sewerage Commission said they made these "substantial revisions in response to community concerns." They said using a mix of natural gas and renewables will "substantially reduce air emissions from PVSC’s day-to-day operations and improve air quality in the surrounding community."

The Sewerage Commission also planned to run the facility to offset their power needs from the grid at other times, thus lowering their energy costs. However — again due to community concerns — the Commission withdrew its request to the state Department of Environmental Protection for that last July.

In January, the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission was scheduled to vote to award a contract to begin building the new power plant. But that same month, a spokesman for Gov. Murphy said he asked the PVSC to postpone the vote, to allow for "a more thorough environmental justice review and robust public engagement process," said Murphy's spokeswoman.

"We're going to move forward in a realistic and environmentally responsible way, Passaic Valley Sewage Commission Chairman Thomas Tucci told Patch at the time.

The Sewerage Commission will now hold a virtual public hearing on the power plant on April 26. If you'd like to attend, here is how to sign up: https://web.pvsc.com/bnews/Sta...

2. The NJ Transit power plant in Kearny

Similar to the Sewerage Commission, NJ Transit says they need to open a power plant in Kearny to provide back-up power for the proposed NJ TransitGrid, a proposed "clean-energy" grid that would power some of the NJ Transit railroad and Hudson-Bergen Light Rail.

Just like the Sewerage Commission, NJ Transit says they need the back-up power because they lost all power to run trains and light rail when Sandy hit.

The proposed location for the NJ Transit power plant is in an industrial zone in Kearny. There is no projected opening date, as the power plant is still in design stages.

NJ Transit filed an air permit application for the power plant in Nov. 20, 2018 and it was withdrawn on Jan. 14, 2021. This is because an NJ Transit spokesman said April 8 that the transit agency has "reimagined (this) project to maximize clean energy and renewables."

NJ Transit is currently awaiting design proposals for the plant from four outside firms.

3. The natural gas plant in Woodbridge, owned by a private company

In Woodbridge, Competitive Power Ventures (CPV) seeks to open a 630-megawatt plant.

This would be their second natural gas plant in Keasby and the power company seeks to open it next to their existing plant that is there now. Keasbey has long been an industrial section of Woodbridge.

CPV is currently requesting an air pollution permit from the New Jersey Department of the Environmental Protection.

As of this week, the DEP has not yet approved or rejected their application.

"The DEP is working with the facility on updating their air impact analysis to incorporate the latest version of the air quality model used and the most recent meteorological data," said DEP spokeswoman Caryn Shinske on April 8. "Competitive Power Ventures also is working with the DEP to comply with the requirements of Administrative Order 2021-25."

Some environmental groups against all three plants

There is considerable opposition to the power plants: A environmental non-profit called Food & Water Watch is actively working to stop all three from opening.

According to Food & Water Watch, combined with its existing power plant, the Woodbridge facility would emit 4.6 million tons of greenhouse gases per year — becoming by far the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the state.

"If approved, the expanded CPV facility would emit more than 2.3 million metric tons of greenhouse gasses each year, and would be one of the largest single sources of climate-destroying carbon emissions in the entire state," said Charlie Kratovil, of Food & Water Watch. "We are calling on Murphy and his Department of Environmental Protection to reject CPV’s air permit application. If Gov. Murphy wants us to believe he is ready to be a climate leader, he will reject the Keasbey plant."

The group says the Murphy administration should reject all three power plants and find a renewable energy alternative.

"If Gov. Murphy wants to live up to his clean energy, environmental justice, and climate commitments, he must direct PVSC to immediately withdraw its air permit application for this power plant and re-write their proposal," said Bill McClelland with Food & Water Watch on April 8.

And many towns near these proposed plants say they don't want the plants in their backyards, or even nearby: The town of Jersey City, Kearny, Secaucus, Union City, Bayonne, Weehawken and Hoboken have all passed formal resolutions opposing the Newark and Kearny plants. The towns of Livingston, Maplewood and Alpine have passed resolutions opposing the plants, as well.

This week, Highland Park issued a formal resolution against the Woodbridge power plant.

With reporting from Eric Kiefer/Patch

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Stop Woodbridge's 2nd Natural Gas Power Plant, NJ Residents Beg Murphy

WOODBRIDGE, NJ — In 2020, to great fanfare, Gov. Phil Murphy signed this environmental justice law, which he called one of the toughest in the nation.And last week, at a Feb. 28 hearing on a second natural gas power plant proposed for Keasbey, some New Jersey residents asked why the governor is not enforcing his own law to stop the plant from being built."Two weeks ago Gov. Murphy said the new policy of the state is to get to 100 percent clea...

WOODBRIDGE, NJ — In 2020, to great fanfare, Gov. Phil Murphy signed this environmental justice law, which he called one of the toughest in the nation.

And last week, at a Feb. 28 hearing on a second natural gas power plant proposed for Keasbey, some New Jersey residents asked why the governor is not enforcing his own law to stop the plant from being built.

"Two weeks ago Gov. Murphy said the new policy of the state is to get to 100 percent clean energy by 2035. It is a really radical idea," said Bloomfield resident Ed Glick at the hearing. "It's a good goal, but this project is very much alive. It is frankly just hypocritical. It's hard to swallow that. This thing of saying one thing and doing something else has to stop. This is a great place to stop it. This dirty, polluting, totally unnecessary plant that is all about the bottom line for the company."

“The proposed Keasbey fossil fuel plant would go directly against Gov. Murphy’s goal for New Jersey to achieve 100 percent clean electricity by 2035,” Tiziana Bottino of the New Jersey Sierra Club said March 1 in this press release.

A media spokesman for the governor did not respond to Patch for this article.

Find out what's happening in Woodbridgewith free, real-time updates from Patch.

In his second term in office, Gov. Murphy unveiled plans that will dramatically increase New Jersey's electricity consumption:

Last month, he announced he wants only all-electric cars to be sold in the state by 2035. Murphy’s Energy Master Plan would require New Jersey residents heat their homes with electric only, and only use electric ovens and stoves. Murphy has said he will power New Jersey's massive spike in electric needs by building thousands of acres of wind farms off the coast, turning the Atlantic Ocean off the Jersey Shore into the largest wind farm in the world, an idea backed by President Joe Biden.

In fact, at the Feb. 28 hearing a spokesman for Competitive Power Ventures — the energy company that wants to build the natural gas plant — said one of the goals of the plant is to specifically provide a back-up if renewable energy from wind or solar does not work.

"As more renewables come online, we are seeing a greater need for flexibility in the system," said the CPV spokesman. "So the point of the Keasbey plant is to help maintain that reliability, keep the lights on."

150 people speak against power plant at 3-hour long Feb. 28 hearing

CPV was required by the state to hold last Tuesday's virtual public hearing.

Of the more than 150 people who signed up to speak at the three-hour long hearing (which you can watch here), Woodbridge residents were given priority, as they will be the most affected by emissions and air pollution from the plant.

"We live a mile away from the first power plant and totally disagree with another power plant in the area," said a Keasbey woman.

"I've been a resident of Woodbridge for 18 years. I wish our town council would oppose this project," said Colonia resident Jean Roy at the hearing. "I suffer from asthma related to air pollution. We have enough pollution here: We have ports in the area; the Turnpike, the Parkway go through town; there's already existing power plants in Woodbridge. We need to move away as quickly as possible from fossil fuels."

"It would be nice to have a plant built in one of the more affluent, prettier areas," he added. "I strongly urge the governor and the DEP to reject this plant."

If the state approves it, this would be CPV's second natural gas-fired power plant in Woodbridge's Keasbey section.

Since 2016, CPV has operated the Woodbridge Energy Center, a 725-megawatt power plant that the company says is one of the most efficient fossil fuel plants on the East Coast. At the Feb. 28 hearing, a CPV spokesman said the Woodbridge Energy Center is so clean it offsets six million tons of Co2 emissions from other plants in America. He also said the plant reuses grey water from the Middlesex County Water Treatment Authority.

The CPV spokesman also said the greenhouse gas emissions from the new plant would be "at the lowest level achievable in the U.S. from a natural gas-fired electric generating station."

Woodbridge Mayor John McCormac repeatedly has called the Woodbridge Energy Center "one of the cleanest plants" in the state. McCormac supports the second plant opening, citing jobs and increased tax revenue to Woodbridge Township.

"If anything, the technology has gotten better regarding emissions, so the second plant will clearly be cleaner than the first," McCormac said just last week.

Keasbey an "overburdened community," state already determined

This second proposed plant will be located immediately adjacent to CPV's existing facility. This new proposed plant will be a 657-megawatt combined natural gas facility. It will used natural gas obtained by fracking methods.

The plant will provide enough electricity for more than 600,000 homes. The CPV spokesman did not say the electricity produced by the plant will go to Woodbridge or even New Jersey residents: Instead, it will be pumped back into the grid.

"One hundred percent of the power from this plant will be sold out of state for profit," warned Matt Smith of Food & Water Watch at the Tuesday hearing. "While the pollution will stay here — not just in Woodbridge and Keasbey, but Perth Amboy and dozens of communities downwind. Gov. Murphy must deny and reject this project."

The 2020 law signed by Murphy specifically "requires mandatory permit denials (to gas-fired power plants) if an environmental justice analysis determines a new facility will have a disproportionately negative impact on overburdened communities" — determined by having a substantial number of low-income or minority residents.

Woodbridge's Keasbey section classifies as one of these "overburdened communities."

When an Associated Press reporter asked the governor's office about this last week, he was referred to the state Department of Environmental Protection. DEP spokesman Larry Hajna said Competitive Power Ventures applied in 2017 for the air quality permit to open the second plant, before the 2020 law was written.

At the hearing, a small handful of people — most of them from the labor trade unions — spoke in support of the second plant, saying it will bring union jobs.

CPV is still waiting on a half-dozen environmental permits from the state and federal government, including that key air pollution permit it requested from the NJ DEP more than five years ago, in 2017.

New Brunswick newspaper New Brunswick Today uploaded the hearing to YouTube. Watch it here:

Ongoing Patch reporting on 2nd proposed natural gas power plant in Woodbridge:

Woodbridge Residents Speak For And Against 2nd Natural Gas Power Plant (Feb. 27, 2023)

3 New NJ Power Plants Coming, 2 Will Definitely Use Natural Gas (April 2022)

Woodbridge Fire Departments Install New Top Brass

Sworn in as officers with Keasbey Protection Fire Company No 1 are Chief Luis Montalvo; Deputy Chief Jack Croft; Captain John Manna; and Lieutenant Richard Polidura.Several of Woodbridge's independent fire departments marked New Year’s Day by administering oaths of office to their new 2024 leaders.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTSSworn in as officers with Fords Fire Company No. 1 are Chief Howie Bauer; 1st Assistant Chief John Dimitrakis; 2nd Assistant Chief Robert Somes; Ca...

Sworn in as officers with Keasbey Protection Fire Company No 1 are Chief Luis Montalvo; Deputy Chief Jack Croft; Captain John Manna; and Lieutenant Richard Polidura.

Several of Woodbridge's independent fire departments marked New Year’s Day by administering oaths of office to their new 2024 leaders.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTS

Sworn in as officers with Fords Fire Company No. 1 are Chief Howie Bauer; 1st Assistant Chief John Dimitrakis; 2nd Assistant Chief Robert Somes; Captain Eric Pado and 1st Lieutenant Gary Nebus.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTS

Officers who took oaths with Hopelawn Engine Company are Chief Michael Walsh; Assistant Chief Nicholas Natale; Captain Jaime Nieves; 1st Lieutenant Brian Turcotte; and 2nd Lieutenant Anthony Natale.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTS

Sworn in as officers with Keasbey Protection Fire Company No 1 are Chief Luis Montalvo; Deputy Chief Jack Croft; Captain John Manna; and Lieutenant Richard Polidura.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTS

Several of Woodbridge's independent fire departments marked New Year’s Day by administering oaths of office to their new 2024 leaders.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTS

PublishedJanuary 2, 2024 at 11:41 AM

WOODBRIDGE, NJ — Several of this community’s independent fire departments marked New Year’s Day by administering oaths of office to their new 2024 leaders.

Oaths were administered to fire chiefs and top leadership at Fords Fire Company; the Hopelawn Engine Company; and Keasbey Protection Fire Company.

TAPinto Woodbridge is proud to present readers with photographs from each of those fire departments.

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● Sworn in as officers with Fords Fire Company No. 1 are Chief Howie Bauer; 1st Assistant Chief John Dimitrakis; 2nd Assistant Chief Robert Somes; Captain Eric Pado and 1st Lieutenant Gary Nebus.

● Officers who took oaths with Hopelawn Engine Company, are Chief Michael Walsh; Assistant Chief Nicholas Natale; Captain Jaime Nieves; 1st Lieutenant Brian Turcotte; and 2nd Lieutenant Anthony Natale.

● Sworn in as officers with Keasbey Protection Fire Company No 1 are Chief Luis Montalvo; Deputy Chief Jack Croft; Captain John Manna; and Lieutenant Richard Polidura.

TAPinto Woodbridge will provide more fire department updates as they become available.

ShopRite Named Most-Trusted Supermarket in the Northeast

Keasbey, NJ – The shoppers have spoken! ShopRite is pleased to announce that it has been named the ‘Most Trusted Grocery Retailer in the Northeast’ in a new survey conducted in partnership with Newsweek magazine and the consultancy firm, BrandSpark International.To identify the winners, Newsweek and BrandSpark International surveyed 3,200 U.S. adults nationwide to capture their opinions of grocery stores across the region. Each retailer was judged according to store format and several attributes beli...

Keasbey, NJ – The shoppers have spoken! ShopRite is pleased to announce that it has been named the ‘Most Trusted Grocery Retailer in the Northeast’ in a new survey conducted in partnership with Newsweek magazine and the consultancy firm, BrandSpark International.

To identify the winners, Newsweek and BrandSpark International surveyed 3,200 U.S. adults nationwide to capture their opinions of grocery stores across the region. Each retailer was judged according to store format and several attributes believed to drive trust, including: Quality, fair prices, recommendation, innovation, customer support, values, transparency, and heritage.

ShopRite ranked first in the survey’s Northeast trust category.

“At a time when shoppers have so many choices, we are extremely proud to have been singled out and recognized by our shoppers as their most-trusted supermarket of choice,” said Karen Meleta, Chief Communications Officer representing the ShopRite banner. “As a cooperative of family-owned and operated businesses, gaining the trust of our customers begins with a commitment to providing fresh, quality foods in a shopping environment where our customers feel welcomed and respected. This has been a hallmark of the brand for more than seven decades.”

ShopRite’s approach to customer service begins with a team of knowledgeable associates who are dedicated to caring for customers whether they are shopping online or being served in-store at our full-service meat, bakery, seafood and deli departments. ShopRite addresses even more personalized needs by offering pharmacy and customized dietitian services. This personal touch continues by providing a broad assortment of quality private label and national brand products that meet the unique needs of the communities where the stores are located. “We continue to remain focused on providing exceptional customer service, convenience, quality and value that ‘sparks’ our customers’ confidence and trust in our brand,” noted Meleta.

To see Newsweek’s story and the results of the survey, click here: https://www.newsweek.com/americas-most-trusted-grocery-retailer/top-5-region

For more information, visit ShopRite.com.

About ShopRite

ShopRite is the registered trademark of Wakefern Food Corp., a retailer-owned cooperative based in Keasbey, NJ, and the largest supermarket cooperative in the United States. With nearly 280 ShopRite supermarkets located throughout New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Delaware and Maryland, ShopRite serves millions of customers each week. Through its ShopRite Partners In Caring program, ShopRite is dedicated to fighting hunger in the communities it serves. Since the program began in 1999, ShopRite Partners In Caring has donated $62 million to food banks that support more than 2,200 worthy charities. As a title sponsor of the ShopRite LPGA Classic Presented by Acer, ShopRite has donated $34 million to local organizations, hospitals and community groups. For more information, please visit www.ShopRite.com.

About BrandSpark International

Founded in 2001, BrandSpark International is a research and consulting firm that provides brands with the insights they need to understand the omni-channel shopper, refine their strategic brand positioning, build consumer trust and improve the success of their new product launches. BrandSpark Marketing Services runs major awards programs the Best New Product Awards and the BrandSpark Most Trusted Awards, and leading shopper community and digital promotions platform www.ShopperArmy.com.

Newsweek Media Partnership

BrandSpark has partnered with premier media brand Newsweek to shine a bright light on these award-winning brands. The partnership will include features of the winners, targeted communications to readers and unique high-value advertising opportunities for brands anchored by editorial content. The BrandSpark Most Trusted Awards has updated its highly influential logo to include the iconic and instantly recognizable Newsweek logo to generate even more impact for shoppers and brands.

Keasbey Brownfield Site Moves Closer to Remediation

Phase two of a massive redevelopment project is officially underway in Keasbey following a ribbon-cutting ceremony along the Raritan River Friday morning, Oct. 28.The ribbon-cutting, held deep in the 120 acre site off Riverfront Road, signals the beginning of the second phase of remediation of the environmental wetlands along the river, the largest segment of the Brownfields Development Area in Keasbey.“This site has not been active since 1984,” said Mayor John McCormac of the redevelopment area. “[The Brownfi...

Phase two of a massive redevelopment project is officially underway in Keasbey following a ribbon-cutting ceremony along the Raritan River Friday morning, Oct. 28.

The ribbon-cutting, held deep in the 120 acre site off Riverfront Road, signals the beginning of the second phase of remediation of the environmental wetlands along the river, the largest segment of the Brownfields Development Area in Keasbey.

“This site has not been active since 1984,” said Mayor John McCormac of the redevelopment area. “[The Brownfields Development Area designation] has been a fantastic agreement, it allows us to get direct access to the DEP...and it’s the reason we’re here today.”

When completed, the future Woodbridge Waterfront Park will include boardwalks along the waterfront and upland areas, bird blinds, hiking trails, scenic overlooks, and more. The project will also allow direct public access to the Raritan River waterfront from Woodbridge – a setup that hasn’t been available to Woodbridge residents since the late 1800s.

The first phase of the project began in July. In addition to the Waterfront Park, plans for the former chemical manufacturing site include business and industrial development. Restoration of the area – including the construction of a 7,000 foot long hydraulic barrier wall, excavation and off-site disposal of impacted soil, lead, and pesticide waste material, capping and filling of an impacted pond, and the construction of a soil cap over the areas within the barrier wall that were formerly manufacturing areas – is expected to take three years.

“To see the BDA here and see the process unfold and to start seeing these sites being cleaned up and remediated and also restored, it gives us hope that this great resource that is the Raritan River can be restored in our lifetime,” said Bob Spiegel, President of Edison Wetlands Association, a non-profit organization that began in the late 1980’s with the goal of cleaning up the Raritan River. “This is a great opportunity.”

The site has been undergoing remediation and clean-up since the early 1990s and was designated a Brownfield Development Area in October 2009 by the Department of Environmental Protection. That allowed the township to work on coordinated remediation and redevelopment, while being eligible for grants of up to $5 million each year from the DEP's Hazardous Discharge Site Remediation Fund for investigation and remediation.

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