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You can embrace a brighter, pain-free future.

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  • Back PainBack Pain
  • Elbow PainElbow Pain
  • Ankle PainAnkle Pain
  • Hip PainHip Pain
  • Shoulder PainShoulder Pain
Physical Therapy Phalanx, NJ  Sciatica Pain Therapy Phalanx, NJ

Physical Therpy For Injuries and Pain in Phalanx, NJ

If there's one universal truth in life, it's that it can be unpredictable. Everyone experiences unexpected events that throw us off. While some surprises may only affect our bank accounts, such as home expenses, others can cause physical harm, such as car accidents that result in long-term pain and discomfort. Many Americans suffer from chronic neck and back pain - according to research, half of Americans over 18 develop musculoskeletal injuries that last longer than a year. These injuries often cause a range of mobility issues that make everyday tasks seem hard to do. Unfortunately, many people with chronic pain turn to addictive medications and invasive surgeries for relief, which tends to lead to further complications.

However, if you are experiencing chronic pain or mobility issues, there's good news: Safer and more effective options are available to you. Physical therapy in Phalanx, NJ is one of the best solutions for eradicating pain, maximizing mobility, improving range of motion, building muscle strength, and helping you regain control of your body. At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, our physical therapists and trainers offer customized programs designed for your body and address your pain symptoms. That way, you have the best possible chance of reclaiming a normal, active life, without surgery or harmful pills.

With the incorporation of therapeutic exercises and manual therapy as well as newer techniques and modalities like AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmills and DRX9000 Spinal DecompressionMachines, our physical therapy services can help address conditions such as:

  • Sciatica Pain
  • Ankle Pain
  • Back Pain
  • Elbow Pain
  • Headaches and Migraines
  • Hip Pain
  • Knee Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Wrist Pain
  • TMJ Pain
 Headaches And Migraines Therapy Phalanx, NJ

Service Areas

When it comes to physical therapy in New Jersey, few clinics can match the care, compassion, and effective treatment options that NJ Sports Spine & Wellness can provide.

Why is Physical Therapy in Phalanx, NJ So Important for Wellness?

Physical therapy can provide numerous benefits, such as pain reduction, enhanced joint and body movement, improved range of motion, proper alignment, and more. While the main goal of physical therapy is to restore function and facilitate a return to regular activities, these outcomes usually result from a broader rehabilitation process, wherein many patients learn a brand-new way of moving.

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, our physical therapists work closely with patients to understand their unique goals, preferences, and abilities. Based on their findings, they create a customized treatment plan that caters to the patient's specific needs.

Here are just a few specific examples of why physical therapy is crucial when recovering from an injury:

  • Physical therapy helps restore function and mobility after illness, injury, or surgery.
  • Physical therapy promotes healing and pain management by utilizing therapeutic modalities and exercises.
  • Physical therapy helps patients suffering from neurological conditions improve their independence.
  • Physical therapy helps seniors avoid falls by improving balance.
  • Physical therapy can improve flexibility and strength to enhance sports and physical activity performance.
  • Physical therapy facilitates injury prevention through education and analysis of proper body mechanics.
 Shoulder Pain Therapy Phalanx, NJ

Whether you're searching for long-term pain relief or need to improve your strength and balance as you age, physical therapy from NJSSW can help.

Now that you understand why physical therapy is crucial for recovery and wellness, let's take a closer look at some of the most effective treatments at our physical therapy clinic in New Jersey.

 Wrist Pain Therapy Phalanx, NJ

The DRX9000: Relief from Chronic Back and Neck Pain

Are you sick of living day-to-day with long-lasting neck or back pain? Have you searched high and low for a safe and effective alternative to surgery? The DRX9000 may be the answer you're looking for.

Beloved by high-level athletes and even celebrities, this advanced medical device employs non-surgical spinal decompression therapy to treat painful conditions such as:

  • Bulging Discs
  • Herniated Discs
  • Spinal Stenosis
  • Facet Syndrome
  • Sciatica
  • Arm Pain from Nerves in Your Neck

The DRX9000 is a device that has been approved by the FDA for treating herniated discs through spinal decompression therapy. This therapy works by applying equal amounts of pressure on your vertebral columns, which stretches your spine and creates a gap between spinal discs. This gap allows for better nutrient flow through your spine, which can help heal injuries gradually with regular treatment sessions. The DRX9000 also utilizes servo motors that rely on nested closed-loop feedback to customize therapy to your unique needs. By using DRX9000, you can often speed up your recovery by addressing your spinal disc issues ASAP.

No Harmful Medications Needed (Do we really need this paragraph or could we just mention it int he beginning about how it is a non-pharmaceutical method)

Perhaps the most significant advantage of the DRX9000 is that it provides a non-pharmaceutical method for relieving pain. With the opioid epidemic affecting the entire nation, many patients are reluctant to take prescription painkillers. The DRX9000 offers a secure and non-addictive alternative for pain relief that does not require medication.

During the course of the treatment, the patient will lie down on a specially designed table that is connected to the machine. The table will then be gently stretched as the machine creates negative pressure within the affected disc. This process will be repeated over a series of sessions, typically ranging from 20 to 30 sessions, depending on the patient's specific condition.

The DRX9000 treatment is considered to be safe and effective for many patients. It is designed to be gentle on the body, and patients usually experience little to no discomfort during their sessions. The machine is also equipped with advanced safety features, including sensors that can detect any sudden movements and stop the machine if necessary.

Expedite Rehab and Training with the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill boasts NASA Differential Air Pressure (DAP) technology, which is a highly accurate air calibration system that leverages your actual body weight to achieve exceptional results in rehab and training. By utilizing a pressurized air chamber, the AlterG allows you to move freely and without pain, as it uniformly reduces gravitational load and body weight by up to 80% in precise 1% increments. This process helps foster improved muscle strength, balance, function, range of motion, and overall fitness.

What Makes the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill So Effective for Physical Therapy in CItyname, State?

AlterG®'s state-of-the-art treadmill provides an entire range of benefits, such as mimicking natural movement and rhythm without the contrived feel of hydrotherapy or harnesses attempting to imitate real-life strides and motions. Additionally, it's beneficial for speeding up recuperation after orthopedic injuries or surgeries by enabling early mobilization and retaining strength. Furthermore, it's excellent for sports recovery since athletes can utilize it to maintain their physical fitness.

Some of the numerous benefits of using the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill include:

  • Accelerated Recovery Time
  • Relief from Impact-Related Pain and Discomfort
  • Customized Programs Suited to Your Needs
  • Effective Solution for All Ages
  • Safe and Controlled Environment
  • Improves Motivation and Confidence
  • Used by Elite Athletes and Celebrities

The AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill is a revolutionary piece of equipment that has transformed the field of physical therapy. With its list of unique features and superhero-worthy benefits, this anti-gravity treadmill is a game-changer that can help you achieve your fitness and recovery goals while also minimizing the risk of injury.

 Chronic  Pain Therapy Phalanx, NJ
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Physical Therapy Phalanx, NJ

Experience Optimized Healing with LiteCureâ„¢ Low-Level Laser Therapy

After reading the headline above, you might be asking yourself, "Are lasers really used for physical therapy in cityname, state?" The answer to your question would be a resounding "Yes!" This advanced type of laser therapy harnesses the power of light through photobiomodulation (PBM), which is revolutionizing how patients heal and deal with pain.

Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a medical process that utilizes targeted light to activate the body's natural healing mechanisms. By penetrating deep into the tissue, photons interact with mitochondria (the cellular powerhouses in your body) to increase energy production. This interaction triggers a biological cascade that leads to increased cellular metabolism. As a result, PBM can reduce pain, accelerate tissue repair, and enhance overall well-being.

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-invasive and painless treatment that utilizes specific wavelengths of light to stimulate healing and reduce pain. It works by penetrating the skin and tissues to promote cellular activity and increase blood flow, which in turn helps to reduce inflammation, relieve pain, and accelerate the healing process.

LLLT has been shown to be effective for a variety of conditions, including musculoskeletal injuries, arthritis, neuropathy, and more. It is a safe and gentle treatment option that can aid in regaining function and mobility from injuries, accidents, surgeries, and other conditions. That makes it a viable and trustworthy addition to your personalized physical therapy plan from NJ Sports Spine & Wellness.

LLLT has shown promising results for challenging conditions that other treatments can't match. Some of the most common conditions treated include:

  • Muscle Pain
  • Pain from Tendinopathy
  • Osteoarthritis Pain
  • Swollen Joints
  • Myofascial Pain
  • Back and Neck Pain
  • Pain from TMJ
  • Achilles Tendon Injury Pain
  • Plantar Fasciitis Pain
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If you're slogging through life and suffering from one or more of the conditions above, you should know that there is hope for pain relief. Contact NJ Sports Spine & Wellness today to find out if low-level laser therapy is right for you.

Freeze Away Pain and Swelling with Ice Compression Therapy

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

Understanding the Powerful Benefits of Ice Compression Therapy

 Sciatica Pain Therapy Phalanx, NJ

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

The "cold" component of ice compression therapy helps nullify nerve-ending sensitivity, which provides pain relief. The extra compression gives you even more pain relief by reducing swelling and pressure on limbs and other body parts.

By improving lymphatic flow and enhancing blood circulation, compression therapy can help reduce swelling and edema, thereby improving your recovery process and simultaneously reducing pain and discomfort.

The concurrent use of cryotherapy and compression can enhance the body's innate healing mechanisms by reducing inflammation, mitigating tissue damage, and stimulating tissue repair.

Game Ready's combination therapy has been shown to be effective in improving joint flexibility and range of motion by promoting tissue healing. This treatment can be a great option for those looking to alleviate discomfort and improve overall joint health.

 Headaches And Migraines Therapy Phalanx, NJ

Whether you're recovering from surgery or you're trying to manage chronic pain in your back or joints, ice compression therapy may be the advanced treatment you need. Contact NJSSW today to learn more about how this treatment can help you live an active life free of pain.

NormaTec Compression Therapy:

A Non-Invasive Option for Enhanced Recovery

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

What Makes NormaTec Compression Therapy Best for Physical Therapy in Cityname, State?

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

NormaTec's compression therapy devices have undergone continuous refinement and improvement since their inception. The adjustable settings of their system enable users to regulate the intensity, duration, and pattern of compression, thereby enabling our skilled providers to tailor treatment to suit the specific requirements and comfort levels of each patient.

 Shoulder Pain Therapy Phalanx, NJ

Experience Holistic Wellness with Cupping Therapy in New Jersey

In the realm of holistic wellness, cupping therapy is a venerable and time-honored practice that has proven to be an effective technique for managing pain and enhancing blood flow. At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we recognize the diverse benefits of cupping therapy, which we offer at both our Matawan and Marlboro, NJ locations.

This ancient technique creates suction on your skin using specialized cups that help promote blood flow, muscle relaxation, and pain relief.

Why is Cupping Therapy Helpful for Physical Therapy in CItyname, State?

 Wrist Pain Therapy Phalanx, NJ

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we believe that incorporating holistic treatments into physical therapy can greatly benefit our patients. As part of our efforts to alleviate stress and manage chronic pain or conditions, we offer cupping therapy as one of those holistic treatments. This modality has been proven effective and offers numerous benefits for physical therapy, which include:

Cupping therapy can help release muscle tension and relieve back pain. The suction from the cups releases fascial restrictions, decreases muscle tightness, and relieves muscle knots, providing relief from pain caused by muscular tightness or strain.

Our skilled practitioners and physical therapists use modern cupping devices and techniques to create consistent suction on the skin, which stimulates blood flow and encourages oxygen-rich blood to flow into muscles and tissues. This improved circulation can reduce inflammation, remove toxins, and promote healing.

Cupping therapy can relieve back pain by improving circulation, reducing muscle tension, and increasing lymphatic drainage. It's a natural and non-invasive approach that can improve mobility and quality of life.

Cupping therapy uses a gentle suction and pulling sensation that helps ease back pain and reduces stress by creating a calming effect on the body and mind, promoting physical and mental healing.

Reclaim Your Mobility with Physical Therapy in Phalanx, NJ

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we always prioritize your well-being and offer comprehensive care tailored to your needs. With customized physical therapy tailored to your specific needs, we provide a drug-free, non-invasive, and highly effective treatment path for pain relief and recovery. From tried-and-true techniques to cutting-edge treatments, we're New Jersey's top choice for innovative physical therapy.

Take the first step towards a pain-free, vibrant life by contacting our office today. It all starts by scheduling your initial consultation. With our highly-trained and licensed specialists by your side, you can embrace a brighter, pain-free future.

 Chronic  Pain Therapy Phalanx, NJ

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Latest News in Phalanx, NJ

Tenants Ask: Why Aren't Hudson County Towns Enforcing Rent Control?

Tenants at a Jersey City meeting spoke of rent increases of 34 percent or more, asking why the city isn't better enforcing rent control.|Updated Fri, Dec 2, 2022 at 7:22 am ETHUDSON COUNTY, NJ — A health care worker told the Jersey City council on Monday night that when she got hit with a surprise rent increase of more than 20 percent this year — after working in the ICU during the COVID pandemic — she didn't feel she had the resources "mentally, physically, and emotionally" to move.But with...

Tenants at a Jersey City meeting spoke of rent increases of 34 percent or more, asking why the city isn't better enforcing rent control.

|Updated Fri, Dec 2, 2022 at 7:22 am ET

HUDSON COUNTY, NJ — A health care worker told the Jersey City council on Monday night that when she got hit with a surprise rent increase of more than 20 percent this year — after working in the ICU during the COVID pandemic — she didn't feel she had the resources "mentally, physically, and emotionally" to move.

But without time to ask questions or go to court, she wasn't sure whether the steep increase was legal.

She was among a growing group of tenants in Jersey City and Hoboken who are in a tough place when facing a high rent increase: Should they spend time researching whether their building falls under rent control, seek a lawyer to help, or move?

A phalanx of tenants from Portside Towers in Jersey City, owned by national firm Equity Residential, attended Monday's regular City Council meeting in Jersey City to ask city officials to do a better job of enforcing existing laws.

They said their landlords had proposed rent hikes this year of as much as 34.5 percent.

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In the 1970s, New Jersey towns passed their own rent stabilization laws in order to ensure that after a tenant gets settled in a building, they aren't subject to sudden increases. Today, New Jersey has more town-by-town rent rules than any state in the nation.

The laws have been fine-tuned over time — both to help landlords make enough money to maintain the buildings, and to ensure that tenants aren't harassed out.

Rent control laws in towns including Jersey City and Hoboken apply to many buildings more than 30 years old, but also apply to newer buildings whose developers never filed for a state exemption when constructed.

Some landlords have skirted the laws for at least a year, but recent large increases prompted tenants to ask questions.

This year, tenants in buildings in both Hoboken and Jersey City have asked town officials to step in when they received rent increases higher than what was allowed, but had to seek out tenant advocates or the media to help before a ruling was issued.

READ MORE: Rivington Rent Hikes Reduced

What's Happening Now

At Monday night's Jersey City meeting, a group of residents at Portside Towers held up newspaper articles about their rent increases, referring to recent stories in the Wall Street Journal and Patch.

"What good is a Jersey City ordinance that isn't enforced?" asked health care worker Alissa Ladas on Monday. "Why have landlords in Jersey City been given unchecked power to cause harm when there are laws to prevent that harm?"

Tenants at the meeting asked the city to do more to hold landlords to the current laws, and they requested documentation on what the city has done to protect tenants so far.

"What will you do from this point forward to address the enforcement of rent control where I live?" asked Portside resident Kevin Weller.

He noted that some landlords are now saying they used software to determine how to raise the rents, rather than consulting local laws.

Tenant and mother Jessica Rasulo read a list of buildings in Hudson County — including 801 Madison St. and the Rivington in Hoboken, and Willow Ridge in Union City — that were eventually determined by courts and local officials to be subject to local rent control, but only after a fight by tenants. READ MORE: Hoboken, Jersey City Rents Highest In Nation, But Are They Legal?

"Jersey City is well aware of these cases but they're attempting to ignore the law," she said, asking, "Why is Jersey City supporting corporations rather than your constituents. No filing, no exemption."

Besides local rent control, the state of New Jersey prohibits rent increases that are "unconscionable," leaving the actual numbers to courts to decide. Local advocates say that past case law has put the state limit at around 25 percent.

Happening All Over

This week, a tenant in workforce housing in Jersey City contacted Patch to say she had been hit with a 37 percent rent increase. She told Patch she wasn't sure it was legal — but also has to make a decision on moving soon.

She said she had called a number on a federal HUD website to get more information, but the number no longer works.

How To Get Free Help

Both Hoboken and Jersey City have officials whose job is to help tenants with rent determinations for free. The Waterfront Project, a nonprofit group based in Jersey City, also helps tenants with legal issues.

Get links to those officials and groups in this story.

Get more local news delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for free Patch newsletters and alerts.

How the College Football Playoff works

Explaining the College Football Playoff is not the same as explaining the systems determining the annual winners of other sports. It’s much funkier.For much of the history of a sport that began in 1869 in New Brunswick, N.J., as a professor supposedly hollered at the proceedings, “This will come to no Christian end,” there could be multiple champions per year. Different services chose different champions and in 1927, to name one year, six schools claimed national titles.Well after that, a system of two polls p...

Explaining the College Football Playoff is not the same as explaining the systems determining the annual winners of other sports. It’s much funkier.

For much of the history of a sport that began in 1869 in New Brunswick, N.J., as a professor supposedly hollered at the proceedings, “This will come to no Christian end,” there could be multiple champions per year. Different services chose different champions and in 1927, to name one year, six schools claimed national titles.

Well after that, a system of two polls picked champions, sometimes two different champions. Peak absurdity came in 1978, when one poll declared Southern California the winner while the other named Alabama, even though Southern California had manhandled Alabama in Alabama that year. All the confusion finally gave way to a Bowl Championship Series from 1998-2013, in which a phalanx of humans and computers would choose two teams to play in one championship game.

Eventually, or very eventually, that gave way to the current system, the College Football Playoff.

It works complicatedly, as with the rest of the 151-year history of college football. A 13-member committee meets five or six or seven times per autumn in a gaudy hotel near the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport. That committee studies the weekend gone by and issues top-25 rankings for five straight Tuesday nights, usually through late October, all of November and early December, then a final ranking on a Sunday midday in early December. The top four teams from that final ranking reach the College Football Playoff. This pandemic year, five meetings run from Nov. 24 through Dec. 20, a late start and finish. The first rankings will be announced at 7 p.m. Tuesday on ESPN.

It began in the imagination in late 2011, once the country finally wearied of merely 142 years of unsatisfying procedures for determining national champions. From late 2011 through 2012 and into 2013 in meeting rooms in various cities, sober administrators who manage a non-sober sport came to gradual and then vast layers of agreement. The actual football part of it began with the 2014-15 season and on Jan. 1, 2015, when the first national semifinals pitted No. 1 seed Alabama against No. 4 seed Ohio State in the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans and No. 2 seed Oregon against No. 3 seed Florida State in the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif.

Generally, it’s a group of model citizens, plus coaches and athletic directors. With the coaches always former and the athletic directors always current, those two groups comprise the majority of the committee. Committee members rotate in and out; by now, 27 people have served and flown to Texas often, including former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice (2014-16) and former U.S. Army Chief of Staff Ray Odierno (2017-present), whose presences on such a committee after their previous pursuits constitute either precipitous decline or significant upgrade, depending on one’s perspective. Recent years have brought college football all-Americans and NFL veterans who refrained from going into coaching: Ronnie Lott (2019-present) and John Urschel (2020).

At present, there are seven athletic directors (Iowa’s Gary Barta, Oklahoma’s Joe Castiglione, Wyoming’s Tom Burman, Colorado’s Rick George, Arkansas State’s Terry Mohajir, Georgia Tech’s Todd Stansbury and Florida’s Scott Stricklin), two retired former head coaches (Ken Hatfield and R.C. Slocum), Odierno, Lott, Urschel and Paola Boivin, a longtime Phoenix sports columnist turned Arizona State professor. In the sportswriter vein, Boivin has followed upon the former USA Today scribe Steve Wieberg (2014-17).

Painstakingly. The committee reviews the weekly avalanche of games and statistics and strengths of schedules in a sport with 130 teams, most of which play in separate conference fiefdoms, with most of same believing themselves to be the center of the known universe. The committee holds discussions in which anyone affiliated with a university being discussed must leave the room and hopefully go to the bar. In its first six years and incarnations, it has shown an impression with teams who dare to play those scheduling rarities: nonconference games against stout opponents. It also has shown a knack long missing during the first century-plus, including those long eras when polls determined champions and often disagreed on same: If Team A is ranked ahead of Team B and both win, it will rearrange the order if Team B played a strong opponent and based on “body of work,” rather than just maintaining the A-B order based on continued wins.

For this pandemic season, it’s slightly diminished and possibly uncertain. The bowls, 40 last year, number 37, and begin on Dec. 19 with the Tropical Smoothie Cafe Frisco Bowl near Dallas, which does sound refreshing. But the semifinals and final of the College Football Playoff remain just as on the long-planned schedule: the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans and Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif., on Jan. 1 for the semifinals, and the national championship game on Jan. 11 in Miami for the final. The semifinal venues rotate among six bowls year to year. The committee also uses rankings to decide participants in the other four big-big-bucks bowls, which this year are the Cotton Bowl in Arlington, Texas, on Dec. 30, the Peach Bowl in Atlanta on Jan. 1, the Fiesta Bowl near Phoenix on Jan. 2, and the Orange Bowl in Miami on Jan. 2.

That question percolates in national discussion in this era even at times when the moon is not full. Long ago around 2012, conference commissioners studied a range of possibilities and decided upon four. The second layer of college football, the Football Championship Series (FCS), plays a tournament each year with 24 teams. But at the top tier, four is an increase from the two of the Bowl Championship Series, which created much angst in those years when three teams went unbeaten or had the same leading record. Bringing it to four has caused annual sullenness at the ranking of No. 5, and has fomented chatter on when it might go to eight, at which point No. 9 will wind up glum, or 16, at which point No. 17 …

No. Of the 24 teams chosen in the six-year history thus far, three did not win conferences. The committee of 2016 chose Ohio State (11-1) and omitted Penn State (11-2) even though Penn State won the Big Ten and defeated Ohio State during the season, because Ohio State had the better record and better wins (including at Oklahoma). The committee of 2017 chose the SEC nonwinner Alabama (11-1) while also choosing the SEC winner (Georgia, at 12-1). The committee of 2018 chose Notre Dame (12-0) even though it did not win a conference on the technicality that it does not play in one except in the circumstance of a catastrophic pandemic.

Yes. It has happened just once, and it wreaked a measure of the nationwide resentment that makes the sport such an irresistible delight. Not only did Georgia (12-1) and Alabama (11-1) both make the playoff in 2017, but each won semifinals and advanced to the national championship game, a regional occasion of long-standing mutual contempt held fittingly in Atlanta, with Alabama winning 26-23 in overtime.

People held meetings. In 2012 alone, commissioners and the sport’s leaders went to meetings in New Orleans, Dallas, South Florida, Chicago, Washington and Denver. They reviewed a range of possibilities until hatching the current system. There’s much agreement, though, that the playoff push got a big shove from the championship game of early 2012, when the old system cranked out an Alabama-LSU rematch so boring it threatened to leave the nation dangerously comatose.

Not very many. The 24 slots thus far have gone to only 11 programs, a paucity less than reflective of the sport’s coast-to-coast vividness. Four programs have hoarded 17 of the berths: five each for Alabama and Clemson, four for Oklahoma and three for Ohio State, lending those four a visibility that has helped lure the recruits who then help hoard further appearances and visibility. Otherwise, the table scraps of a single appearance have gone to seven different programs: Oregon, Florida State, Michigan State, Washington, Georgia, Notre Dame, and LSU. Those seven have gone 3-4 in their semifinals, with the wins going to Oregon, Georgia and LSU. Those three semifinal winners have gone 1-2 in championship games, with that win coming last January and going to LSU.

Scores | Rankings | Standings | Stats

Conference shakeup: The ground beneath college sports took its most disfiguring shake to date as Southern California and UCLA announced they are leaving the Pac-12 for the Big Ten.

Jerry Brewer: As college sports change, coaches must stop whining and amplify new voices.

Name, image and likeness: As NIL money keeps rising for players, coaches like Jimbo Fisher and Nick Saban are lobbing accusations at each other while most Americans are still enjoying college sports, a Post-UMD poll finds. The NCAA has issued guidelines for schools, but boosters like Miami’s John Ruiz aren’t worried.

USC’s fever dream: At the Trojans’ spring game, minds long addled with college football might struggle to remember where all of the players and coaches used to be.

Season wrap-up: College football can’t ruin the magic of college football, no matter how hard it tries.

Barry Svrluga: Kirby Smart finally vanquished Nick Saban, and now college football feels different.

John Feinstein: Don’t underestimate Deion Sanders — and don’t take your eyes off him.

Show more

Keansburg Native Matthew Kalfus Serves Aboard Navy Warship

By Patricia RodriguezPublishedFebruary 15, 2022 at 2:26 PMKEANSBURG, NJ – Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Kalfus, a native of Keansburg, New Jersey, serves the U.S. Navy aboard U.S. Navy warship operating out of Norfolk. Kalfus joined the Navy five years ago. Today, Kalfus serves as an operation specialist aboard USS Truxtun.“I like to try out different things and be challenged,” said Kalfus. “That’s why I joined the Navy. ...

By Patricia Rodriguez

PublishedFebruary 15, 2022 at 2:26 PM

KEANSBURG, NJ – Petty Officer 3rd Class Matthew Kalfus, a native of Keansburg, New Jersey, serves the U.S. Navy aboard U.S. Navy warship operating out of Norfolk. Kalfus joined the Navy five years ago. Today, Kalfus serves as an operation specialist aboard USS Truxtun.

“I like to try out different things and be challenged,” said Kalfus. “That’s why I joined the Navy. Also my grandfather was in the Navy so it's in the family.”

Growing up in Keansburg, Kalfus attended Keansburg High School and graduated in 2010. Today, Kalfus relies upon skills and values similar to those found in Keansburg to succeed in the military.

“I learned how to build up my communication skills and how to work hard,” said Kalfus.

These lessons have helped Kalfus while serving aboard USS Truxtun.

A Navy destroyer is a multi-mission ship that can operate independently or as part of a larger group of ships at sea. The ship is equipped with tomahawk missiles, torpedoes, guns and a phalanx close-in weapons system.

Destroyers like USS Truxtun are taking part in an initiative called Task Group Greyhound (TGG). It is designed to provide the fleet with additional continuously ready, fully certified warships prepared to accomplish a full range of on-demand missions. TGG assigns Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers homeported at Mayport, Florida and Norfolk, Virginia to be at-the-ready to fill fleet commander requirements and to counter Russian naval threats to the homeland. A growing priority, the destroyer's activities also support the need to maintain an undersea warfare competitive edge over Russian submarines off the East Coast.

Serving in the Navy means Kalfus is part of a team that is taking on new importance in America’s focus on rebuilding military readiness, strengthening alliances and reforming business practices in support of the National Defense Strategy.

“The Navy contributes to national security by protecting our shorelines and ensuring freedom of navigation,” said Kalfus.

With more than 90 percent of all trade traveling by sea, and 95 percent of the world’s international phone and internet traffic carried through underwater fiber optic, Navy officials continue to emphasize that the prosperity and security of the United States is directly linked to a strong and ready Navy.

The Surface Force is responding to the realities of the modern security environment, and their efforts are critical in preserving freedom of the seas, deterring aggression, and winning wars.

According to Commander Naval Surface Forces Vice Adm. Roy Kitchener, “The Surface Force will continue to meet the challenge of strategic competition and respond to the realities of the modern security environment. Our efforts are critical to preserve freedom of the seas, deter aggression and win wars.”

Kalfus and the sailors they serve with have many opportunities to achieve accomplishments during their military service.

“I’m most proud of getting the enlisted surface warfare device and landing my dream job of operation specialist database operator,” said Kalfus. “Now I'm working my way to becoming a lead database manager.”

As Kalfus and other sailors continue to train and perform missions, they take pride in serving their country in the United States Navy.

“Serving is making sacrifices in order to protect our country and the ones we love,” added Kalfus.

USS Truxtun is part of the USS George H.W. Bush Strike Group ramping up for a fleet exercise that will integrate multi-level faceted training that will prepare them for future deployments. The ship’s crew has successfully completed all basic phase training and is making outstanding progress to be prepared to operate in a complex seamanship environment.

What Does a Failed New Jersey Utopia Have to Do with the Algonquin Round Table?

Phalanx Road is a quiet road that runs through the towns of Lincroft and Colts Neck in central New Jersey. It’s not unlike many thoroughfares in places where the suburban and the rural quietly blend into one another. But if you look closely enough at the side of the road, you’ll see a small plaque, alluding to a little-known piece of social history: This modest stretch of road was home to a utopian community in the 19th century, whose backers included the abolitionist editor...

Phalanx Road is a quiet road that runs through the towns of Lincroft and Colts Neck in central New Jersey. It’s not unlike many thoroughfares in places where the suburban and the rural quietly blend into one another. But if you look closely enough at the side of the road, you’ll see a small plaque, alluding to a little-known piece of social history: This modest stretch of road was home to a utopian community in the 19th century, whose backers included the abolitionist editor Horace Greeley.

Phalanx Road was not named by an urban planner with a fondness for ancient Roman military formations. Instead, it’s an acknowledgment of this unique place. From 1843 to 1856, the North American Phalanx, a community built around the ideals of the French philosopher Charles Fourier, was located in what is now Colts Neck. Fourier’s philosophy emphasized communal living and labor and at its peak, 150 people resided in this particular community. One of the backers was Greeley, an early supporter of Fourier’s ideas in the United States.

The North American Phalanx was one of the largest communities of its kind in the United States, second only to Massachusetts’s Brook Farm, which was run along Fourierist lines from 1843 until 1847.

The project was begun with gusto. Photographs of the Phalanstery, the centerpiece of the community built in 1847, reveal a building modest in design but expansive in scale. From a central entranceway runs a long two-story wing, with several chimneys arising from the roof. It was one of several buildings on the property, including a dormitory, a blacksmith shop, and a flour mill. In an article in the Spring 1974 issue of The Monmouth Historian–the journal of the Monmouth County Historical Association–the Rev. M. Joseph Mokrzycki described the components of the Phalanstery, including apartments, a musicians’ gallery, and a grand salon, a reading room, in which international newspapers and a paper produced by the Phalanx could be found.

Would-be members had to submit to a lengthy probationary period. “[P]rimary attention was placed on an individual’s ability to work with others under the theory of association,” Mokrzycki writes–“association” being Brisbane’s preferred term for Fourierism. Fourier believed (this is something of a simplification) that by bringing diverse groups of people into a system of collective living, social divisions would gradually erode, and more and more people would spontaneously adopt the Fourierist manner of living. Unfortunately, the reality of many Phalanxes did not correspond to Fourier’s ideals: several such communities were set up in the United States, but none endured.

But humans weren’t the only problem at this particular utopia. In 1854, a fire destroyed several of its buildings, with the resulting cost being the primary factor that led to its disbanding two years later. The community was already a tenuous one at that point. Founder Albert Brisbane had hoped for a population of over 1,000, a goal that was never reached, and a rival utopia–the Raritan Bay Union in nearby Perth Amboy, established in 1853–caused some members to drift away.

A later fire destroyed what was left of the Phalanstery in 1972. Two cottages from the original property remain as private homes. A historical marker denotes the site, and, in 1998, a local Eagle Scout restored the Colts Neck cemetery that likely housed the bodies of several members of the community.

After the Phalanx left the site, a man named John Bucklin bought it and operated a cannery there. Bucklin was the maternal grandfather of Alexander Woollcott–writer, critic, contributor to the early New Yorker, and member of the Algonquin Round Table. And it was in the Phalanstery that Woollcott was born, over 30 years after the Phalanx dissolved.

This is how a failed, short-lived experiment in communal living in New Jersey made it into 20th century American literature. Woollcott’s 1934 nonfiction collection While Rome Burns contains an essay titled “Aunt Mary’s Doctor,” described as a “chapter from an as yet unwritten autobiography.” Here, he recalls the circumstances of his aunt’s death, and discusses the house in which he was born. He repeatedly cites “ghosts,” including the legacy of slavery in New Jersey, which has ties to the assembly of a building on the property; and of the rumor that several of George Washington’s troops were later buried there. And then he takes the reader to a more recent–though still many years distant–moment, bringing them back to the days of the Phalanx.

Then there is the ghost of Mr. Greeley, who used to take his nap on a chair on the veranda, the red bandanna, which would be thrown across his face, bellying rhythmically with his snores, and all the young fry compelled to go about on tiptoe because the great editor was disposed to doze.

Portrait of Art Samuels, Charlie MacArthur, Harpo Marx, Dorothy Parker and Alexander Woollcott - part of the Algonquin Round Table - in 1919. (Photo: Public Domain/WikiCommons)

This is not a recollection of Woollcott himself, as he was born 15 years after Greeley’s 1872 death. Instead, it’s a kind of summoning of the past, an exhumation of an intellectual legacy. Whether or not the Phalanx had a more direct influence on Woollcott’s intellectual development is less clear, though the two seemed to share a contrarian streak. Perhaps the history of his birthplace helped him to understand the virtues of a life that eluded societal convention. Or perhaps the image of Greeley in slumber was simply too good to pass up. Regardless, the legacy of the North American Phalanx can be found if you look closely enough–in archives, in memoirs, and on the side of a road.

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