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You can embrace a brighter, pain-free future.

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Physical Therapy Locust, NJ  Sciatica Pain Therapy Locust, NJ

Physical Therpy For Injuries and Pain in Locust, NJ

If there's one universal truth in life, it's that it can be unpredictable. Everyone experiences unexpected events that throw us off. While some surprises may only affect our bank accounts, such as home expenses, others can cause physical harm, such as car accidents that result in long-term pain and discomfort. Many Americans suffer from chronic neck and back pain - according to research, half of Americans over 18 develop musculoskeletal injuries that last longer than a year. These injuries often cause a range of mobility issues that make everyday tasks seem hard to do. Unfortunately, many people with chronic pain turn to addictive medications and invasive surgeries for relief, which tends to lead to further complications.

However, if you are experiencing chronic pain or mobility issues, there's good news: Safer and more effective options are available to you. Physical therapy in Locust, NJ is one of the best solutions for eradicating pain, maximizing mobility, improving range of motion, building muscle strength, and helping you regain control of your body. At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, our physical therapists and trainers offer customized programs designed for your body and address your pain symptoms. That way, you have the best possible chance of reclaiming a normal, active life, without surgery or harmful pills.

With the incorporation of therapeutic exercises and manual therapy as well as newer techniques and modalities like AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmills and DRX9000 Spinal DecompressionMachines, our physical therapy services can help address conditions such as:

  • Sciatica Pain
  • Ankle Pain
  • Back Pain
  • Elbow Pain
  • Headaches and Migraines
  • Hip Pain
  • Knee Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Wrist Pain
  • TMJ Pain
 Headaches And Migraines Therapy Locust, NJ

Service Areas

When it comes to physical therapy in New Jersey, few clinics can match the care, compassion, and effective treatment options that NJ Sports Spine & Wellness can provide.

Why is Physical Therapy in Locust, NJ So Important for Wellness?

Physical therapy can provide numerous benefits, such as pain reduction, enhanced joint and body movement, improved range of motion, proper alignment, and more. While the main goal of physical therapy is to restore function and facilitate a return to regular activities, these outcomes usually result from a broader rehabilitation process, wherein many patients learn a brand-new way of moving.

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, our physical therapists work closely with patients to understand their unique goals, preferences, and abilities. Based on their findings, they create a customized treatment plan that caters to the patient's specific needs.

Here are just a few specific examples of why physical therapy is crucial when recovering from an injury:

  • Physical therapy helps restore function and mobility after illness, injury, or surgery.
  • Physical therapy promotes healing and pain management by utilizing therapeutic modalities and exercises.
  • Physical therapy helps patients suffering from neurological conditions improve their independence.
  • Physical therapy helps seniors avoid falls by improving balance.
  • Physical therapy can improve flexibility and strength to enhance sports and physical activity performance.
  • Physical therapy facilitates injury prevention through education and analysis of proper body mechanics.
 Shoulder Pain Therapy Locust, NJ

Whether you're searching for long-term pain relief or need to improve your strength and balance as you age, physical therapy from NJSSW can help.

Now that you understand why physical therapy is crucial for recovery and wellness, let's take a closer look at some of the most effective treatments at our physical therapy clinic in New Jersey.

 Wrist Pain Therapy Locust, NJ

The DRX9000: Relief from Chronic Back and Neck Pain

Are you sick of living day-to-day with long-lasting neck or back pain? Have you searched high and low for a safe and effective alternative to surgery? The DRX9000 may be the answer you're looking for.

Beloved by high-level athletes and even celebrities, this advanced medical device employs non-surgical spinal decompression therapy to treat painful conditions such as:

  • Bulging Discs
  • Herniated Discs
  • Spinal Stenosis
  • Facet Syndrome
  • Sciatica
  • Arm Pain from Nerves in Your Neck

The DRX9000 is a device that has been approved by the FDA for treating herniated discs through spinal decompression therapy. This therapy works by applying equal amounts of pressure on your vertebral columns, which stretches your spine and creates a gap between spinal discs. This gap allows for better nutrient flow through your spine, which can help heal injuries gradually with regular treatment sessions. The DRX9000 also utilizes servo motors that rely on nested closed-loop feedback to customize therapy to your unique needs. By using DRX9000, you can often speed up your recovery by addressing your spinal disc issues ASAP.

No Harmful Medications Needed (Do we really need this paragraph or could we just mention it int he beginning about how it is a non-pharmaceutical method)

Perhaps the most significant advantage of the DRX9000 is that it provides a non-pharmaceutical method for relieving pain. With the opioid epidemic affecting the entire nation, many patients are reluctant to take prescription painkillers. The DRX9000 offers a secure and non-addictive alternative for pain relief that does not require medication.

During the course of the treatment, the patient will lie down on a specially designed table that is connected to the machine. The table will then be gently stretched as the machine creates negative pressure within the affected disc. This process will be repeated over a series of sessions, typically ranging from 20 to 30 sessions, depending on the patient's specific condition.

The DRX9000 treatment is considered to be safe and effective for many patients. It is designed to be gentle on the body, and patients usually experience little to no discomfort during their sessions. The machine is also equipped with advanced safety features, including sensors that can detect any sudden movements and stop the machine if necessary.

Expedite Rehab and Training with the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill boasts NASA Differential Air Pressure (DAP) technology, which is a highly accurate air calibration system that leverages your actual body weight to achieve exceptional results in rehab and training. By utilizing a pressurized air chamber, the AlterG allows you to move freely and without pain, as it uniformly reduces gravitational load and body weight by up to 80% in precise 1% increments. This process helps foster improved muscle strength, balance, function, range of motion, and overall fitness.

What Makes the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill So Effective for Physical Therapy in CItyname, State?

AlterG®'s state-of-the-art treadmill provides an entire range of benefits, such as mimicking natural movement and rhythm without the contrived feel of hydrotherapy or harnesses attempting to imitate real-life strides and motions. Additionally, it's beneficial for speeding up recuperation after orthopedic injuries or surgeries by enabling early mobilization and retaining strength. Furthermore, it's excellent for sports recovery since athletes can utilize it to maintain their physical fitness.

Some of the numerous benefits of using the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill include:

  • Accelerated Recovery Time
  • Relief from Impact-Related Pain and Discomfort
  • Customized Programs Suited to Your Needs
  • Effective Solution for All Ages
  • Safe and Controlled Environment
  • Improves Motivation and Confidence
  • Used by Elite Athletes and Celebrities

The AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill is a revolutionary piece of equipment that has transformed the field of physical therapy. With its list of unique features and superhero-worthy benefits, this anti-gravity treadmill is a game-changer that can help you achieve your fitness and recovery goals while also minimizing the risk of injury.

 Chronic  Pain Therapy Locust, NJ
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Physical Therapy Locust, NJ

Experience Optimized Healing with LiteCureâ„¢ Low-Level Laser Therapy

After reading the headline above, you might be asking yourself, "Are lasers really used for physical therapy in cityname, state?" The answer to your question would be a resounding "Yes!" This advanced type of laser therapy harnesses the power of light through photobiomodulation (PBM), which is revolutionizing how patients heal and deal with pain.

Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a medical process that utilizes targeted light to activate the body's natural healing mechanisms. By penetrating deep into the tissue, photons interact with mitochondria (the cellular powerhouses in your body) to increase energy production. This interaction triggers a biological cascade that leads to increased cellular metabolism. As a result, PBM can reduce pain, accelerate tissue repair, and enhance overall well-being.

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-invasive and painless treatment that utilizes specific wavelengths of light to stimulate healing and reduce pain. It works by penetrating the skin and tissues to promote cellular activity and increase blood flow, which in turn helps to reduce inflammation, relieve pain, and accelerate the healing process.

LLLT has been shown to be effective for a variety of conditions, including musculoskeletal injuries, arthritis, neuropathy, and more. It is a safe and gentle treatment option that can aid in regaining function and mobility from injuries, accidents, surgeries, and other conditions. That makes it a viable and trustworthy addition to your personalized physical therapy plan from NJ Sports Spine & Wellness.

LLLT has shown promising results for challenging conditions that other treatments can't match. Some of the most common conditions treated include:

  • Muscle Pain
  • Pain from Tendinopathy
  • Osteoarthritis Pain
  • Swollen Joints
  • Myofascial Pain
  • Back and Neck Pain
  • Pain from TMJ
  • Achilles Tendon Injury Pain
  • Plantar Fasciitis Pain
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If you're slogging through life and suffering from one or more of the conditions above, you should know that there is hope for pain relief. Contact NJ Sports Spine & Wellness today to find out if low-level laser therapy is right for you.

Freeze Away Pain and Swelling with Ice Compression Therapy

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

Understanding the Powerful Benefits of Ice Compression Therapy

 Sciatica Pain Therapy Locust, NJ

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

The "cold" component of ice compression therapy helps nullify nerve-ending sensitivity, which provides pain relief. The extra compression gives you even more pain relief by reducing swelling and pressure on limbs and other body parts.

By improving lymphatic flow and enhancing blood circulation, compression therapy can help reduce swelling and edema, thereby improving your recovery process and simultaneously reducing pain and discomfort.

The concurrent use of cryotherapy and compression can enhance the body's innate healing mechanisms by reducing inflammation, mitigating tissue damage, and stimulating tissue repair.

Game Ready's combination therapy has been shown to be effective in improving joint flexibility and range of motion by promoting tissue healing. This treatment can be a great option for those looking to alleviate discomfort and improve overall joint health.

 Headaches And Migraines Therapy Locust, NJ

Whether you're recovering from surgery or you're trying to manage chronic pain in your back or joints, ice compression therapy may be the advanced treatment you need. Contact NJSSW today to learn more about how this treatment can help you live an active life free of pain.

NormaTec Compression Therapy:

A Non-Invasive Option for Enhanced Recovery

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

What Makes NormaTec Compression Therapy Best for Physical Therapy in Cityname, State?

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

NormaTec's compression therapy devices have undergone continuous refinement and improvement since their inception. The adjustable settings of their system enable users to regulate the intensity, duration, and pattern of compression, thereby enabling our skilled providers to tailor treatment to suit the specific requirements and comfort levels of each patient.

 Shoulder Pain Therapy Locust, NJ

Experience Holistic Wellness with Cupping Therapy in New Jersey

In the realm of holistic wellness, cupping therapy is a venerable and time-honored practice that has proven to be an effective technique for managing pain and enhancing blood flow. At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we recognize the diverse benefits of cupping therapy, which we offer at both our Matawan and Marlboro, NJ locations.

This ancient technique creates suction on your skin using specialized cups that help promote blood flow, muscle relaxation, and pain relief.

Why is Cupping Therapy Helpful for Physical Therapy in CItyname, State?

 Wrist Pain Therapy Locust, NJ

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we believe that incorporating holistic treatments into physical therapy can greatly benefit our patients. As part of our efforts to alleviate stress and manage chronic pain or conditions, we offer cupping therapy as one of those holistic treatments. This modality has been proven effective and offers numerous benefits for physical therapy, which include:

Cupping therapy can help release muscle tension and relieve back pain. The suction from the cups releases fascial restrictions, decreases muscle tightness, and relieves muscle knots, providing relief from pain caused by muscular tightness or strain.

Our skilled practitioners and physical therapists use modern cupping devices and techniques to create consistent suction on the skin, which stimulates blood flow and encourages oxygen-rich blood to flow into muscles and tissues. This improved circulation can reduce inflammation, remove toxins, and promote healing.

Cupping therapy can relieve back pain by improving circulation, reducing muscle tension, and increasing lymphatic drainage. It's a natural and non-invasive approach that can improve mobility and quality of life.

Cupping therapy uses a gentle suction and pulling sensation that helps ease back pain and reduces stress by creating a calming effect on the body and mind, promoting physical and mental healing.

Reclaim Your Mobility with Physical Therapy in Locust, NJ

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we always prioritize your well-being and offer comprehensive care tailored to your needs. With customized physical therapy tailored to your specific needs, we provide a drug-free, non-invasive, and highly effective treatment path for pain relief and recovery. From tried-and-true techniques to cutting-edge treatments, we're New Jersey's top choice for innovative physical therapy.

Take the first step towards a pain-free, vibrant life by contacting our office today. It all starts by scheduling your initial consultation. With our highly-trained and licensed specialists by your side, you can embrace a brighter, pain-free future.

 Chronic  Pain Therapy Locust, NJ

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Latest News in Locust, NJ

Honor Trenton’s Fallen Soldiers at Locust Hill Cemetery

May is already halfway through, and Memorial Day is approaching. Many see this holiday as the unofficial start to summer, and although the parties and parades are fun, we must never forget those who have fallen in defense of the United States of America. To honor those who paid the ultimate price in defending our freedoms, all community members are invited to Locust Hill Cemetery to honor those brave men who perished in defense of the values that shape the rights and liberties we enjoy today.On Saturday, May 27th, guests are invited t...

May is already halfway through, and Memorial Day is approaching. Many see this holiday as the unofficial start to summer, and although the parties and parades are fun, we must never forget those who have fallen in defense of the United States of America. To honor those who paid the ultimate price in defending our freedoms, all community members are invited to Locust Hill Cemetery to honor those brave men who perished in defense of the values that shape the rights and liberties we enjoy today.

On Saturday, May 27th, guests are invited to the historic Locust Hill Cemetery for a Memorial Day remembrance ceremony. Locust Hill Cemetery, located at 73 Hart Ave, Trenton, NJ 08618, is home to at least 10 African American Civil War veterans, earning the designation of Trenton’s most significant remaining African American burial ground. Although much has changed since these soldiers heroically fought, the city has grown and evolved in incredible ways, but what has not changed is the honor and bravery of those men who bravely served. This event is an excellent opportunity for the entire community to dive deeper into its history, offer their respects for those who served, and put into context what this holiday is all about.

Kicking off at 11 a.m., the public is invited to join in honoring the veterans interred at Locust Hill in a traditional flag placement and remembrance ceremony. Ten flags will be planted in the Cemetery sod during the ceremony, one for each Civil War veteran buried there. The exact locations of their graves are unknown, and the veterans’ identity is “known only to God.” Regardless, they will be remembered with reverence and gratitude for their service during our nation’s most excellent hour of trial.

Locust Hill African Cemetery and Museum is invaluable to Trenton’s history. Over the years, the cemetery has undergone significant restoration efforts to ensure that the Black lives laid to rest in this space are given the respect and honor they deserve. Since it was initially opened in the 1800s, Locust Hill Cemetery was given the distinction as the earliest African American burial site in the City of Trenton. This is a truly sacred space with a profound and rich history. The upcoming Memorial Day Remembrance Ceremony is the perfect opportunity to honor those who served and now rest in the Capital City.

The flag placement is sponsored by several impactful community organizations, including the 6th Regiment U.S. Colored Troops Reenactors, the Kiwanis Club of Trenton, and the City of Trenton Department of Recreation, Natural Resources, and Culture. The ceremony is free, and the public is encouraged to attend. If you have any questions before the event, please contact (609) 208-9991 for additional details.

Historic Havens: Historic Portland Place in Hartshorne Woods Park

This month, we travel to the far eastern corner of the Locust section of Middletown to visit Historic Portland Place, located at 200 Hartshorne Rd. This sprawling 15-acre property, now operated by the Monmouth County Park System, was the farmstead and then country home of one of the founding families of Middletown, the Hartshornes. The name is most easily recognized in the park named after them, Hartshorne Woods Park, and is pronounced “harts horn,” in case you wondered.Richard Hartshorne (1641-1722) emigrated from England...

This month, we travel to the far eastern corner of the Locust section of Middletown to visit Historic Portland Place, located at 200 Hartshorne Rd. This sprawling 15-acre property, now operated by the Monmouth County Park System, was the farmstead and then country home of one of the founding families of Middletown, the Hartshornes. The name is most easily recognized in the park named after them, Hartshorne Woods Park, and is pronounced “harts horn,” in case you wondered.

Richard Hartshorne (1641-1722) emigrated from England in 1669. Eight generations of descendants succeeded him. Richard was an English Quaker and a statesman who encouraged Quaker emigration to the young colony of East Jersey, calling it “a healthful, fertile and peaceful place.” He also became one of the county’s most prominent landholders. Portland Place is named after the Portland Tract. At one time, the tract was more than 2,400 acres of scenic waterfront property that began at the mouth of Sandy Hook and ran along the Navesink River. The land was divided among his descendants upon his death, and it was Richard’s son, William, who held the 200-acre farm that became known as Portland Place. Many family members sold their parcels over time; some even sold their property to the U.S. government for coastal defense – today’s Battery Lewis Historic Site – but the core remained in family ownership into the mid-1900s.

Some generations of Hartshornes were trade ships owners, farmers, art collectors and philanthropists. Some stayed and some moved on, like Benjamin Minturn Hartshorne (1826 – 1900), who made his fortune on the West Coast during the California Gold Rush. It was his fortune that helped sustain Portland Place’s transition from a working farm into country gentleman’s estate. This is the main house you will see along with gardens on the 15-acre property. The restored 19th century barn serves as the Visitor’s Center and houses exhibits about the Hartshorne family history and the area’s early settlements.

The elegance of the main home is literally full of history. In fact, the original 18th century cabin is now the dining room. That cabin is the core of the historic house and was added over the centuries, all while maintaining a modest farmhouse architectural style.

You will also be treated to sweeping views of the Navesink River and the beauty of the forested bluffs of the Navesink Highlands. The preserved century forests are the home of numerous sensitive wildlife species and stately tulip trees.

The family has preserved many artifacts, and the home features furnishings, household items and artwork from the eras. Some Hartshorne family members were known art collectors and commissioned artwork by several prominent American and British painters whose work you can see in the historic house.

In 2008, Daniel Ward Seitz, a Hartshorne descendant, bequeathed Portland Place to the Monmouth County Park System, ensuring its preservation for future generations and uniting historic Portland Place with more than 800 acres of preserved Hartshorne Woods Park lands.

As the park system embarked on its inaugural season, Gail Hunton, chief of Acquisition and Design for the Monmouth County Park System, commented, “We are grateful to Daniel Ward Seitz for bequeathing his family’s historic home. It has been our great honor to fulfill Dan’s wishes to restore Portland Place as a park system historic site to share the bigger story of this place in its magnificent setting.”

Portland Place is listed on the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places. Visiting season runs until Nov. 19, then Portland Place is set to reopen in 2024 during the first weekend of May.

Leashed dogs and responsible owners are allowed on the grounds but not in the buildings. The first floor is fully accessible, but the upstairs is available via stairs only. Please ask one of the historic site interpreters for a color guidebook of photos and descriptions of the second-story rooms.

The buildings are open Wednesday through Sunday 9 am to 4 pm, and docent-led tours are offered at 10:30 am, 11:30 am, 1:30 pm and 2:30 pm, weather permitting; you can sign up at the Visitor’s Center on the day of the tour. This site, gardens and parking area are open seven days a week during daylight hours.

Tours are limited to 10 visitors at a time, and larger groups can be broken into two tours. To arrange a tour, email Dorothy Reilly, who Historic Havens sincerely thanks for her assistance with this article, at Dorothy.Reilly@co.monmouth.nj.us.

Reilly, historic site interpreter for the park system, shared, “An enthralled visitor recently commented that he never thought he’d have access to such a prestigious property, and his weekly visits are now the highlight of his summer. We encourage everyone to visit to enjoy this remarkable and local historic resource.”

There is limited on-site parking for Portland Place visitors, and Hartshorne Woods Park hikers are asked to park at Rocky Point, Claypit Creek or Buttermilk Valley access points.

Visit MonmouthCountyParks.com or call 732-842-4000 for updates and more information on Portland Place and the park system’s other county historic sites.

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Here are 9 fall festivals in South Jersey you don't want to miss

Nothing says fall in South Jersey like a down-home festival.Hayrides, pumpkin or apple picking, live music, food trucks, beer gardens, crafters, even books. You know the drill.From Bordentown, down to the Jersey Shore, there are fall festivals you might want to mark on your calendars.Here are nine fall festivals to check out:Evesham Harvest Festival, MarltonOver 50 handcrafters will be at the rain or shine event, which will feature artists, food vendors, live music and a family fun atmosphe...

Nothing says fall in South Jersey like a down-home festival.

Hayrides, pumpkin or apple picking, live music, food trucks, beer gardens, crafters, even books. You know the drill.

From Bordentown, down to the Jersey Shore, there are fall festivals you might want to mark on your calendars.

Here are nine fall festivals to check out:

Evesham Harvest Festival, Marlton

Over 50 handcrafters will be at the rain or shine event, which will feature artists, food vendors, live music and a family fun atmosphere.

It will be held Sept. 23 from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Main Street Marlton, between Maple and Plymouth Avenue.

Sunflower September Festival, Johnson’s Locust Hall Farm, Jobstown

Participants can handpick pumpkins, apples and sunflowers, explore a five-acre family corn maze. There will be live music, food trucks, Farmhouse Grill, Tomasello Winery tasting outlet, animal farm, hayride scenic tours and more.

The event takes place each Saturday and Sunday in September, beginning at 11:30 a.m. It becomes the "fall harvest festival" in October.

Reservations are needed for the park-and-pick program.

Go: 2691 Monmouth Road, 609-353-9000; johnsonslocusthallfarm.com/

Made in Jersey Festival, Wiggins Waterfront Park, Camden

Come out for the festival, which celebrates “all things New Jersey.”

The time is 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and the date is Sept. 30.

Corn, Jersey-made beers, wines and spirits, tomatoes, peaches, farm fresh food, artisanal products and more.

There will be live music, family fun. Vendors and crafters from all over the state will be present.

Go: 2 Riverside Drive, https://www.camdencounty.com/event/made-in-jersey-festival-2/

Ocean City NJ Fall Block Party, Ocean City

The fall block party and fireworks spectacular will be held Oct. 7 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. from 5th to 14th streets along Asbury Avenue.

More than 400 crafters, food vendors, music and more will be available. There will be fireworks over the Boardwalk in the evening.

Collingswood Book Festival, Collingswood

The award-winning book fest, which will be Oct. 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., is in its 21st year.

Its website calls the festival the longest-running and largest literary event in the Delaware Valley and says the 2019 attendance surpassed 7,000.

Generally, more than 60 presenting authors attend with an additional 275 authors and exhibitors. There are literary games, food and other activities. There is always a poetry tent as well.

All of the events are free for the festival, which is run by volunteers and community members from the region.

Some of the featured authors this year include Philadelphia sports radio personality Angelo Cataldi, who will talk about his upcoming book, "Loud: How a Shy Nerd Turned Up the Volume in the Most Passionate Sports City in America" and Matthew Quick, the New York Times bestselling author of “The Silver Linings Playbook”, and many more.

Go: Haddon Avenue between Homestead and Collings Avenue. Parking is free in PATCO transit lots. collingswoodbookfestival.com/

Oktoberfest at Historic Smithville Village, Galloway

Historic Smithville hosts the Oktoberfest event on Oct. 7 and 8 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The event will feature more than 100 juried crafters, an international food court, kids activities, music and more. They add to the more than 60 shoppes, carousel rides, train rides, paddle boats, antique arcades that are available year-round at Smithville Village.

A free shuttle runs from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. each day and departs from the Smithville Shopping Center on Moss Mill Road.

Go: 615 E. Moss Mill Road.

Cranberry Festival, Bordentown City

The Cranberry Festival and 33rd Makers Fest on Farnsworth kicks off Oct. 7 and 8 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

There will be over 150 booths of artists, craftspeople, vendors, and restaurants along a one-square mile of the city.

Clothing, candles, antiques, art, along with award-winning restaurants represented at the food court and there will be a craft beer garden.

Live music will take the stage as well.

Go: Farnsworth Avenue and Crosswicks Street, btowncranfest.com/

Wheaton Arts Festival of Fine Craft Artists, Millville

More than 150 artists exhibiting and selling their handcrafted works, along with craft demonstrations, specialty foods, live music, a food court with gourmet food vendors, beer and wine garden and hands-on family art activities. WheatonArts signature glass pumpkin fundraiser opens during the festival.

The rain or shine event will be Oct. 7 and 8 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Tickets are available online or at the front gate. $12 for adults, $11 seniors (62 or older), $7 students and children 5 and under are free.

Go: 1501 Glasstown Road, 856-825-6800; https://www.wheatonarts.org/calendar-eventon/festival-of-fine-craft/

Gloucester Township Food Truck and Craft Beer Festival, Blackwood

There will be plenty of live music and food trucks at the festival.

How about a beer and wine garden? Yes, they have that, too.

General seating tents and a complementary shuttle running from Highland High School will be available.

The event is Oct. 21 from 2 to 7 p.m. Rain date is Oct. 22.

Go: 15 South Black Horse Pike, https://glotwp.com/news/2023-gloucester-township-food-craft-beer-festival/

Here's where a tornado pummeled South Jersey towns

CINNAMINSON – A tornado that hit Saturday evening traveled six miles from Cinnaminson into Delran and Moorestown, according to the National Weather Service.And it was preceded by a "downburst event" that toppled trees in Palmyra and Riverton.No injuries were reported.The twister, although graded as a “weak” EF-1 tornado, had peak winds of 100 mph that took down trees and power lines, the Weather Service said in a preliminary report Sunday evening.The tornado began at 6:59...

CINNAMINSON – A tornado that hit Saturday evening traveled six miles from Cinnaminson into Delran and Moorestown, according to the National Weather Service.

And it was preceded by a "downburst event" that toppled trees in Palmyra and Riverton.

No injuries were reported.

The twister, although graded as a “weak” EF-1 tornado, had peak winds of 100 mph that took down trees and power lines, the Weather Service said in a preliminary report Sunday evening.

The tornado began at 6:59 p.m. and ended just six minutes later, the agency said.

Wind, rain and the fear of tornadoNational Weather Service confirms 4 tornadoes in South Jersey. Investigation ongoing in Bucks.

Tornado damage in Cinnaminson

It first touched down near Riverton Road and Woodside Lane in Cinnaminson, “where multiple trees were snapped and uprooted,” according to the Weather Service.

Taylor and Kristen Parry were among Cinnaminson residents who lost electricity when 40-foot trees fell outside their Riverton Road home.

"We heard heavy rain with freight-train sound and then the winds came, “ Taylor Parry said Sunday as a PSE&G crew worked to restore power in his neighborhood.

Damage at Cinnaminson schools

The tornado then traveled towards Cinnaminson High School and Eleanor Rush Intermediate School, where "relatively minor damage" included downed trees and damaged fencing, said Stephen Cappello, the school district's superintendent.

"We feel extremely fortunate that our schools are able to operate and we wish the very best for members of our community who may be experiencing hardships right now," Cappello said Monday.

The strongest wind damage occurred near Wynwood Drive and Locust Lane, where a house lost most of its roof.

The tornado then crossed Route 130 and entered Lakeview Memorial Cemetery, “where a large swath of softwood trees were either uprooted or snapped at the trunk,” the Weather Service said.

“The damage path continued through the neighborhoods surrounding New Albany Road and Endicott Avenue, moving towards the communities near Ravenswood Park,” it said.

The tornado crossed Haines Mill Road in Delran where it grew to its greatest width of 634 yards.

EF1 tornado toppled trees, downed wires

After crossing Bridgeboro Road, the tornado entered a nature preserve where the damage path was lost.

"Minor tree and limb damage was observed again near John Pryor Field in Moorestown,” the Weather Service reported, noting more widespread damage occurred near Hartford Road and Worthington Drive, and on Dominion Drive.

The tornado uprooted trees or left them leaning on utility poles along Borton Landing Road.

It broke branches and damaged the exteriors of homes in the Laurel Creek Country Club neighborhood “before snapping the top of one final utility pole on Centerton Road.”

The downburst, which formed in advance of the tornado, hit Palmyra and Riverton with winds of 90 to 100 mph. It followed a one-mile path that was 616 yards wide.

The downburst started in Palmyra at 6:55 p.m. and ended at 6:58 p.m. near Riverton Country Club.

“Numerous trees were uprooted or snapped beginning near the intersection of East Broad Street and Elm Avenue on the border of Palmyra,” said the Weather Service.

Staff writer Carol Comegno contributed to this story.

Jim Walsh is a senior reporter with the Courier-Post, Burlington County Times and The Daily Journal.

Middletown's G&W Contractors grew from listening — and not listening — to his dad

Special to the Asbury Park PressMIDDLETOWN - Scott Ward's father didn't want his son working in the contracting trade. But Ward wouldn't listen, and he's glad he didn't.Ward, owner of G&W Contractors Inc. in the Locust section of Middletown, started working at 17 for his father, Bernie Ward, who started out as a builder and later became a project manager.“He had his own business in the 1980s and started out with two pieces of property,” Ward said. “He was mainly building homes and got...

Special to the Asbury Park Press

MIDDLETOWN - Scott Ward's father didn't want his son working in the contracting trade. But Ward wouldn't listen, and he's glad he didn't.

Ward, owner of G&W Contractors Inc. in the Locust section of Middletown, started working at 17 for his father, Bernie Ward, who started out as a builder and later became a project manager.

“He had his own business in the 1980s and started out with two pieces of property,” Ward said. “He was mainly building homes and got caught in the middle of a recession. He left that career and went to work for someone else.

“He did not want me in this industry,” Ward said. “After working with him in the summertime and through high school, he would deliberately give me the hardest jobs he could think of, just to discourage me from wanting to follow along this same path and encourage me to go to college. I remember one time he forced me to dig a trench in the heat. I was too stubborn and wanted to keep at it, so he decided to teach me the business.

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“He hooked me up with a framing business,” Ward said. “As a project manager, he would manage a bunch of different sub-contractors while they worked big jobs for him. The guys I worked with were mainly Portuguese, but two of them spoke English, and so I could go to them if I had any questions, as I was learning how to do everything.

“After two years, I got kind of bored with it, so he got me another job with an electrician business,” Ward said. “I stayed with them for four years and got into the union. Unfortunately, there was an incident where a guy my age burned his hands after getting shocked by a live electrical wire. I remember the sound of the shock. It made a loud pop and he yelled out pretty loud. After experiencing that, it scared the hell out of me and I decided to stay away of the electric panels. It just wasn’t for me.”

Ward and his father would go on to Newark doing low-income housing work for the state. Although the money was great, Ward had a more than his fair share of bad experiences with the safety of the area itself.

“We would get these pre-fabricated houses from Pennsylvania and we would go all over Newark touching them up after they were put together,” Ward said. “We would wait for the electricians and the plumbers to do their thing and then we would do all of the sheet rock and spackling.

"I enjoyed the work, but I would never do it again because it’s a very dangerous area,” Ward said. “From growing up in Rumson/Fair Haven to witnessing the stuff that took place in Newark, I learned a lesson to do the work in a safe space. One time, we showed up and there were bullet holes in the front doors. It was a different world there.”

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'People always need to have work done'

After his time in Newark, Ward figured he had enough experience under his belt to open his own business as a general contractor in 1995. He initially started the business with partner Greg Guinta, the "G" in G&W, who has since left the business.

“I realized I really liked the construction industry,” Ward said. “My father taught me a lot about it and I learned a lot over the years. I picked up some things along the way because there is always something different to do. People always need to have work done to their house. I added everything up in my head and realized it wasn’t a bad career path to pursue.

“I was a little nervous starting up from scratch,” Ward said. “When we first stated up, no one knew we were out there. I remember one of my first jobs starting out was to paint someone’s back deck. I didn’t like painting very much, but it came with the job.”

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Working as a general contractor means a lot of coordinating.

“I get the plans for a job and I subcontract or hire different companies to take care of different, smaller aspects of the entire project,” Ward said. “I then go ahead and hire a company that specializes in that part of the project that I couldn’t do with my own crew.

“All of my sub-contractors could be anyone from masons to electricians to plumbers because I can’t do all of that work on my own. It’s just too much. Aside from that, some of my main duties are taking care of the permits, coordinating all the inspections, I make sure there are no questions and I make sure the necessary materials are here. It’s like climbing a ladder. Every step has to be taken to get the job done.”

Starting small

Ward's early struggles involved finding clients. “We started out doing small jobs like fixing someone’s handrail or painting someone’s back deck,” Ward said. “Our main goal was to save money and just provide ourselves with the essentials, including things like buying a company truck, tools for the job, general liability insurance, workman’s compensation and just paying ourselves for the jobs we took on.

“It took me a couple of years to become established,” Ward said. “It takes a little while to put the numbers together and make sure you aren’t losing money at the same time you are trying to make it.”

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Ward finds great satisfaction is a job well done.

“When you have a homeowner that is really appreciative of what you’ve done, that is what is most gratifying for myself and my crew, more than the payment part of it,” Ward said. “At the end of the job, the customer goes as far as to post something online about their appreciation of a job well done. It’s the thank you that you get at the end of the job that is the best reward you can receive.”

Ward and his company take on both residential and commercial spots with their work.

“I recently finished a restaurant in Marlboro, which was very gratifying,” Ward said. “Although I do 90% residential work, we do take on those other projects and we are proud of the work we have done so far.”

Although Ward and his crew were working in the middle of COVID-19, they got through it with everything intact.

“I took all of the necessary precautions to make sure all of our workers were properly tested and fit to work around one another, no matter what the job,” Ward said. “We really buckled down when it came to safety. That was the name of the game.”

Ward doesn’t see himself giving up the work anytime soon.

“I told my wife I am going to keep going and I don’t think I am ever going to retire,” Ward said. “She told me that was OK because I would just drive her crazy anyway. At the most, I’ll scale down from doing five projects to two. It will keep my heart healthy.”

G&W Contractors Inc.

Owner: Scott Ward

Location: Middletown

Phone: 732-915-3229

Website: https://www.facebook.com/GW-Contractors-Inc-698190576946266

Locust eyes change in government form

The Locust City Council approved a resolution last week aimed at altering the city’s form of government from mayor-council to council-manager.The main discernible difference is Cesar Correa would be considered a city manager as opposed to his current title of city administrator.A draft of the text change to the city charter will be presented to the council during its meeting May 11. A public hearing will also be scheduled during the meeting. The proposed changes would then most likely be adopted during c...

The Locust City Council approved a resolution last week aimed at altering the city’s form of government from mayor-council to council-manager.

The main discernible difference is Cesar Correa would be considered a city manager as opposed to his current title of city administrator.

A draft of the text change to the city charter will be presented to the council during its meeting May 11. A public hearing will also be scheduled during the meeting. The proposed changes would then most likely be adopted during council’s June 8 meeting.

Correa has been city administrator since September 2016, according to his LinkedIn page. Prior to his time in Locust, he was the assistant township administrator for the New Jersey township of Maplewood.

“It’s essentially, to be honest with you, to reward Cesar for the great job he has done for us,” said Councilman Harry Fletcher, who introduced the resolution. He added council-manager will give “a little bit more official authority” for Correa.

Having managed the operations of the city for seven years, including overseeing six departments, and obtaining numerous certifications, “I think this may be a difference in terminology but it really does reflect more highly his position with the city,” said Mayor Steve Huber.

“Locust City Council has always been supportive of my professional development and membership with both the International City/County Management Association (ICMA) and the NC City/County Management Association (NCCCMA),” Correa said in emailed comments to the SNAP. “I am proud to work for a governing board that is committed to effective, transparent, responsive, and accountable government.”

Council-Manager is the most common form of government across the country, including in North Carolina. The vast majority of N.C. cities with populations exceeding 2,500 have this form of government, while many smaller communities tend to favor mayor-council form, according to the UNC School of Government.

About Chris Miller

Chris Miller has been with the SNAP since January 2019. He is a graduate of NC State and received his Master's in Journalism from the University of Maryland. He previously wrote for the Capital News Service in Annapolis, where many of his stories on immigration and culture were published in national papers via the AP wire.

More by Chris

Fall Destination: Johnson’s Locust Hall Farm, in Jobstown

As Halloween candy, and, dare I say it, Christmas decorations, pop up in stores where there were once sand shovels, buckets, and beach towels, I also find that I’m starting to anticipate crisp mornings, earlier twilights, and weekends spent at area farms.Johnson’s Locust Hall Farm, a beautifully preserved and family-owned-and-operated, 17th-century farm is one of the places you will surely find me throughout the season.My husband and I recently attended Locals Night, where all are actually welcome! Johnson’s L...

As Halloween candy, and, dare I say it, Christmas decorations, pop up in stores where there were once sand shovels, buckets, and beach towels, I also find that I’m starting to anticipate crisp mornings, earlier twilights, and weekends spent at area farms.

Johnson’s Locust Hall Farm, a beautifully preserved and family-owned-and-operated, 17th-century farm is one of the places you will surely find me throughout the season.

My husband and I recently attended Locals Night, where all are actually welcome! Johnson’s Locust Hall Farm is home to a field that faces the setting sun, and as the light fades (during the “Golden Hour,” everything is bathed in a magical golden glow.

Aside from the natural beauty of the farm, Locals Night also included a variety of food trucks, a beer garden featuring Screaming Hill Brewery, and ice cream served from the farm market. Guests enjoyed live music and hayrides to the sunflower fields, where they could pick a bouquet to bring home or snap the perfect Instagram picture. Another highlight of the evening was Tomasello Winery’s tasting bar, located on the farm. (Guests could enjoy glasses there or take some wine home.)

Locals Night may be over, but there’s still quite a lot to experience at Johnsons Locust Hall Farm this season. Sunflower September features the farm’s sunflower trail–take a stroll through the fields this weekend! And apple picking is also underway!

On weekends in October, enjoy Fall Harvest Festivals! Stop by to pick out a pumpkin, and enjoy the live music, food trucks, and the onsite Farmhouse Grill for lunch. Festival season is also the perfect time for scenic hayrides, a corn maze, and tours of the farm. Before you go, stop by the Farm Market to pick up unique seasonal decorations, pies, apple cider doughnuts, and, yes, a bottle of Tomasello wine.

Johnsons Locust Farm also hosts events throughout the year, including Sunday Brunch, flower arranging workshops, and more. It is the perfect backdrop for a wedding or other special event.

See the website for additional information on upcoming events, hours, private event inquiries, and farm reservations.

Johnson’s Locust Hall Farm 2691 Monmouth Road Jobstown, NJ 609-353-9000

Locust Grove in Wantage contained guest house, hotel and trading post

New Jersey HeraldWANTAGE — The Clove section of Wantage is situated along the Clove River and was one of the four mill sites that used its water power in 1845.I had read that there was a gristmill, a plastermill and a sawmill in this area and decided to explore it for any remains. The millpond and a section of the dam are visible from Route 23.Some time ago, Dan and I started out where the old totem pole was located near the site of the Titsworth house. (This totem pole is no longer there. It was knocked down in an...

New Jersey Herald

WANTAGE — The Clove section of Wantage is situated along the Clove River and was one of the four mill sites that used its water power in 1845.

I had read that there was a gristmill, a plastermill and a sawmill in this area and decided to explore it for any remains. The millpond and a section of the dam are visible from Route 23.

Some time ago, Dan and I started out where the old totem pole was located near the site of the Titsworth house. (This totem pole is no longer there. It was knocked down in an accident.)

The stone Titsworth house was built in 1710 and was used as a fort during the French and Indian War. In later years it was a little shop that used a totem pole as part of its trading post business around the time High Point opened as a state park in the 1920s.

We headed to the area of the millpond and explored the dam but couldn’t find any remains other than what may have been part of a sluiceway near the highway bridge. We decided to head upstream and ended up near an old road. This road came off Route 23 in front of the old totem pole and headed a short way back from there.

We came up on an old cellar foundation that was pretty large. On one corner it had a large set of cement stairs that rose upward from above the basement level.

We headed back to the Titsworth house site and continued inspecting the stone walls to see which could have been the house. As we viewed every angle for a clue, I kept seeing those stairs down the hillside; they caught your eye.

Later that evening, as I read Bill Truran’s book about Wantage and scanned photos of the old fort, I saw a photo titled “Locust Grove Farm.” This farm was located on that old road that we had walked in front of Titsworth’s homesite. This farm had a small hotel with a large porch. The steps to the porch were very prominent and they struck me as the ones I had seen earlier.

Sure enough, they were! The caption reads: “The owner’s name is J.C. House. Located in the area known as Locust Grove is the

main house, guest house and the old stone dwelling (Titsworth house) that served as a trading post along Route 23 and the Clove Brook.” So although we set out to find an old mill, which we did not locate, we did find a small forgotten section of Wantage called “Locust Grove,” which, thanks to Bill’s book and photos, came back to life for the day.

Effort to preserve Trenton’s Black history gets a funding boost from Amazon employees

Black employees at two Amazon hubs in New Jersey collectively donated $10,000 to help preserve Black history in Trenton.The money will go towards the restoration of the historic Locust Hill Cemetery, the city’s oldest burial site for African Americans, which will also serve as the location of Trenton’s first Black museum. Boosters said it could become a catalyst for neighborhood development.“We’re going to use this as the centerpiece and expand out to improve the housing on the street, the landscape, the...

Black employees at two Amazon hubs in New Jersey collectively donated $10,000 to help preserve Black history in Trenton.

The money will go towards the restoration of the historic Locust Hill Cemetery, the city’s oldest burial site for African Americans, which will also serve as the location of Trenton’s first Black museum. Boosters said it could become a catalyst for neighborhood development.

“We’re going to use this as the centerpiece and expand out to improve the housing on the street, the landscape, the artscape of the street, the lighting, and the parking,” said Algernon Ward, Jr., the president of the 6th Regiment United States Colored Troops reenactors. His organization is overseeing the project. “We’re really excited to not only open this museum to commemorate our ancestors, but also to begin the work of rehabilitating this entire community.”

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Before it was a cemetery, the land in modern day East Trenton was known as Locust Grove Hill, a place where the militia in colonial times would practice. Ward said Indigenous people likely used the land long before Trenton came into existence. “We’re finding bits of evidence to kind of strengthen that conjecture,” he said, adding that they are working with archeologists to investigate.

The grove became a cemetery for African Americans after 1860, one of several throughout the city until the sites were consolidated at Locust Hill. Algernon believes more than 200 people are buried at the site, including 10 civil war veterans.

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The donation by the online retail giant came from its Black Employee Network, an affinity group within Amazon. D.J. Welch, an operations manager at the company’s Florence hub, said they wanted to make a bigger impact on the community in 2022.

“We made quite a bit of impact throughout Burlington County, even Camden County,” he said. “We were talking, strategizing, like, how are we going to take this to a whole other level?”

For Welch, who was born and educated in Trenton, the project was personal, citing a history of Black veterans in his family.

“I wanted to be able to make sure that they are recognized here,” he added.

Between the Florence and Deptford hubs, each contributed $5,000 to help with the restoration and the construction.

The donation was apparently unexpected. Ward praised the company’s involvement, noting that employees have already volunteered at the site.

“We hear of corporate responsibility and investment in the neighborhood. We rarely see it,” he said. “But here today, it’s been proven to us that, at least at Amazon, they are serious about it.”

Ward said that the money is “going to work us for a little bit” and told the crowd gathered the architect estimates the restoration work and the museum would come to between $350,000 and $840,000.

“But this is the beginning,” he proclaimed. “We are rolling!”

Trenton Mayor Reed Gusciora said the new museum gives the city an opportunity to create an African American history trail in the capital city, citing several sites in addition to Locust Hill like the Carver Center and the Higbee School.

“This is an opportunity to make it relevant for the citizens in the city, but also for the citizens in the state to come here and not only visit the revolutionary sites, but the other historic sites that really make up Trenton,” he said.

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Flashback: Bob Dylan Recalls 1970 Cicada Swarm at Princeton in ‘Day of the Locusts’

Billions of cicadas that have been underground since 2004 are currently swarming all over the eastern United States, making life absolutely miserable for anyone unlucky enough to live near them. The situation is particularly bad in Washington, D.C., where their numbers are so high that swarms have actually been picked up on weather radar. They filled up the engine of a plane meant to carry reporters to England to cover Biden’s first trip abroad, somehow breaking it and ...

Billions of cicadas that have been underground since 2004 are currently swarming all over the eastern United States, making life absolutely miserable for anyone unlucky enough to live near them. The situation is particularly bad in Washington, D.C., where their numbers are so high that swarms have actually been picked up on weather radar. They filled up the engine of a plane meant to carry reporters to England to cover Biden’s first trip abroad, somehow breaking it and forcing officials to scramble and find a new plane.

A cicada even hit Biden himself as he walked to Air Force One. “Watch out for the cicadas,” he told reporters as he smacked one on his neck. “One just got me.”

This particular group of cicadas is known as Brood X and they hit every 17 years. That means they’ve also come up in 2004, 1987, and 1970. Those 1970 cicadas — essentially the great-grandparents of the current brood — hit Princeton University when Bob Dylan was on hand to accept an honorary degree. A report on the event in Rolling Stone didn’t mention the insects, but it did paint a vivid portrait of his time on the campus with his wife Sara and buddy David Crosby.

“Because of the heat and presumably in sympathy with the majority of the day’s 1200 graduating seniors, Dylan at first refused to wear a black robe,” it reads. “When the ceremonies did begin, Dylan put on an academic gown over his dark-blue, pin-striped suit, but refused the ‘mortar-board’ cap. He also tied a white arm-band on, like the majority of the graduating seniors. The band was engraved with the peace symbol and the insignia of the graduating class, a number ’70.'”

“After the ceremony, Dylan left the stage,” it continues, “took off his robe and with his party, got into a waiting car and drove on down the road.”

He was midway through recording New Morning at the time, and when he went back into the studio on August 12th, 1970, to finish the album, he had a brand new song called “Day of the Locusts” about his time at Princeton. (Check it out right here.) It’s basically a straight-ahead account of the day, down to the intense heat, Crosby’s head “explodin'” from weed he smoked earlier in the day, and his burning desire to get out of there as soon as possible.

In his 2004 memoir Chronicles, Dylan remembers being introduced at the event as “the authentic expression of the disturbed and concerned conscience of Young America.” This did not sit well with him. “I couldn’t believe it!” he writes. “Tricked once more … The sunlight was blocking my vision, but I could still see the faces gawking at me with such strange expressions. I was so mad I wanted to bite myself.”

There were indeed cicadas that day, but it’s clear that Dylan felt that the most irritating locusts were people who swarmed around him wherever he went and burdened him with labels like “the concerned conscience of Young America.” The insects were probably pretty annoying as well.

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