Lodaer Img

You can embrace a brighter, pain-free future.

  • Neck PainNeck Pain
  • Back PainBack Pain
  • Elbow PainElbow Pain
  • Ankle PainAnkle Pain
  • Hip PainHip Pain
  • Shoulder PainShoulder Pain
Physical Therapy Jerseyville, NJ  Sciatica Pain Therapy Jerseyville, NJ

Physical Therpy For Injuries and Pain in Jerseyville, NJ

If there's one universal truth in life, it's that it can be unpredictable. Everyone experiences unexpected events that throw us off. While some surprises may only affect our bank accounts, such as home expenses, others can cause physical harm, such as car accidents that result in long-term pain and discomfort. Many Americans suffer from chronic neck and back pain - according to research, half of Americans over 18 develop musculoskeletal injuries that last longer than a year. These injuries often cause a range of mobility issues that make everyday tasks seem hard to do. Unfortunately, many people with chronic pain turn to addictive medications and invasive surgeries for relief, which tends to lead to further complications.

However, if you are experiencing chronic pain or mobility issues, there's good news: Safer and more effective options are available to you. Physical therapy in Jerseyville, NJ is one of the best solutions for eradicating pain, maximizing mobility, improving range of motion, building muscle strength, and helping you regain control of your body. At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, our physical therapists and trainers offer customized programs designed for your body and address your pain symptoms. That way, you have the best possible chance of reclaiming a normal, active life, without surgery or harmful pills.

With the incorporation of therapeutic exercises and manual therapy as well as newer techniques and modalities like AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmills and DRX9000 Spinal DecompressionMachines, our physical therapy services can help address conditions such as:

  • Sciatica Pain
  • Ankle Pain
  • Back Pain
  • Elbow Pain
  • Headaches and Migraines
  • Hip Pain
  • Knee Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Wrist Pain
  • TMJ Pain
 Headaches And Migraines Therapy Jerseyville, NJ

Service Areas

When it comes to physical therapy in New Jersey, few clinics can match the care, compassion, and effective treatment options that NJ Sports Spine & Wellness can provide.

Why is Physical Therapy in Jerseyville, NJ So Important for Wellness?

Physical therapy can provide numerous benefits, such as pain reduction, enhanced joint and body movement, improved range of motion, proper alignment, and more. While the main goal of physical therapy is to restore function and facilitate a return to regular activities, these outcomes usually result from a broader rehabilitation process, wherein many patients learn a brand-new way of moving.

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, our physical therapists work closely with patients to understand their unique goals, preferences, and abilities. Based on their findings, they create a customized treatment plan that caters to the patient's specific needs.

Here are just a few specific examples of why physical therapy is crucial when recovering from an injury:

  • Physical therapy helps restore function and mobility after illness, injury, or surgery.
  • Physical therapy promotes healing and pain management by utilizing therapeutic modalities and exercises.
  • Physical therapy helps patients suffering from neurological conditions improve their independence.
  • Physical therapy helps seniors avoid falls by improving balance.
  • Physical therapy can improve flexibility and strength to enhance sports and physical activity performance.
  • Physical therapy facilitates injury prevention through education and analysis of proper body mechanics.
 Shoulder Pain Therapy Jerseyville, NJ

Whether you're searching for long-term pain relief or need to improve your strength and balance as you age, physical therapy from NJSSW can help.

Now that you understand why physical therapy is crucial for recovery and wellness, let's take a closer look at some of the most effective treatments at our physical therapy clinic in New Jersey.

 Wrist Pain Therapy Jerseyville, NJ

The DRX9000: Relief from Chronic Back and Neck Pain

Are you sick of living day-to-day with long-lasting neck or back pain? Have you searched high and low for a safe and effective alternative to surgery? The DRX9000 may be the answer you're looking for.

Beloved by high-level athletes and even celebrities, this advanced medical device employs non-surgical spinal decompression therapy to treat painful conditions such as:

  • Bulging Discs
  • Herniated Discs
  • Spinal Stenosis
  • Facet Syndrome
  • Sciatica
  • Arm Pain from Nerves in Your Neck

The DRX9000 is a device that has been approved by the FDA for treating herniated discs through spinal decompression therapy. This therapy works by applying equal amounts of pressure on your vertebral columns, which stretches your spine and creates a gap between spinal discs. This gap allows for better nutrient flow through your spine, which can help heal injuries gradually with regular treatment sessions. The DRX9000 also utilizes servo motors that rely on nested closed-loop feedback to customize therapy to your unique needs. By using DRX9000, you can often speed up your recovery by addressing your spinal disc issues ASAP.

No Harmful Medications Needed (Do we really need this paragraph or could we just mention it int he beginning about how it is a non-pharmaceutical method)

Perhaps the most significant advantage of the DRX9000 is that it provides a non-pharmaceutical method for relieving pain. With the opioid epidemic affecting the entire nation, many patients are reluctant to take prescription painkillers. The DRX9000 offers a secure and non-addictive alternative for pain relief that does not require medication.

During the course of the treatment, the patient will lie down on a specially designed table that is connected to the machine. The table will then be gently stretched as the machine creates negative pressure within the affected disc. This process will be repeated over a series of sessions, typically ranging from 20 to 30 sessions, depending on the patient's specific condition.

The DRX9000 treatment is considered to be safe and effective for many patients. It is designed to be gentle on the body, and patients usually experience little to no discomfort during their sessions. The machine is also equipped with advanced safety features, including sensors that can detect any sudden movements and stop the machine if necessary.

Expedite Rehab and Training with the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill boasts NASA Differential Air Pressure (DAP) technology, which is a highly accurate air calibration system that leverages your actual body weight to achieve exceptional results in rehab and training. By utilizing a pressurized air chamber, the AlterG allows you to move freely and without pain, as it uniformly reduces gravitational load and body weight by up to 80% in precise 1% increments. This process helps foster improved muscle strength, balance, function, range of motion, and overall fitness.

What Makes the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill So Effective for Physical Therapy in CItyname, State?

AlterG®'s state-of-the-art treadmill provides an entire range of benefits, such as mimicking natural movement and rhythm without the contrived feel of hydrotherapy or harnesses attempting to imitate real-life strides and motions. Additionally, it's beneficial for speeding up recuperation after orthopedic injuries or surgeries by enabling early mobilization and retaining strength. Furthermore, it's excellent for sports recovery since athletes can utilize it to maintain their physical fitness.

Some of the numerous benefits of using the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill include:

  • Accelerated Recovery Time
  • Relief from Impact-Related Pain and Discomfort
  • Customized Programs Suited to Your Needs
  • Effective Solution for All Ages
  • Safe and Controlled Environment
  • Improves Motivation and Confidence
  • Used by Elite Athletes and Celebrities

The AlterG Anti-Gravity Treadmill is a revolutionary piece of equipment that has transformed the field of physical therapy. With its list of unique features and superhero-worthy benefits, this anti-gravity treadmill is a game-changer that can help you achieve your fitness and recovery goals while also minimizing the risk of injury.

 Chronic  Pain Therapy Jerseyville, NJ
lm-btm-sec-line
Physical Therapy Jerseyville, NJ

Experience Optimized Healing with LiteCureâ„¢ Low-Level Laser Therapy

After reading the headline above, you might be asking yourself, "Are lasers really used for physical therapy in cityname, state?" The answer to your question would be a resounding "Yes!" This advanced type of laser therapy harnesses the power of light through photobiomodulation (PBM), which is revolutionizing how patients heal and deal with pain.

Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a medical process that utilizes targeted light to activate the body's natural healing mechanisms. By penetrating deep into the tissue, photons interact with mitochondria (the cellular powerhouses in your body) to increase energy production. This interaction triggers a biological cascade that leads to increased cellular metabolism. As a result, PBM can reduce pain, accelerate tissue repair, and enhance overall well-being.

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-invasive and painless treatment that utilizes specific wavelengths of light to stimulate healing and reduce pain. It works by penetrating the skin and tissues to promote cellular activity and increase blood flow, which in turn helps to reduce inflammation, relieve pain, and accelerate the healing process.

LLLT has been shown to be effective for a variety of conditions, including musculoskeletal injuries, arthritis, neuropathy, and more. It is a safe and gentle treatment option that can aid in regaining function and mobility from injuries, accidents, surgeries, and other conditions. That makes it a viable and trustworthy addition to your personalized physical therapy plan from NJ Sports Spine & Wellness.

LLLT has shown promising results for challenging conditions that other treatments can't match. Some of the most common conditions treated include:

  • Muscle Pain
  • Pain from Tendinopathy
  • Osteoarthritis Pain
  • Swollen Joints
  • Myofascial Pain
  • Back and Neck Pain
  • Pain from TMJ
  • Achilles Tendon Injury Pain
  • Plantar Fasciitis Pain
lm-btm-sec-line

If you're slogging through life and suffering from one or more of the conditions above, you should know that there is hope for pain relief. Contact NJ Sports Spine & Wellness today to find out if low-level laser therapy is right for you.

Freeze Away Pain and Swelling with Ice Compression Therapy

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

Understanding the Powerful Benefits of Ice Compression Therapy

 Sciatica Pain Therapy Jerseyville, NJ

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

The "cold" component of ice compression therapy helps nullify nerve-ending sensitivity, which provides pain relief. The extra compression gives you even more pain relief by reducing swelling and pressure on limbs and other body parts.

By improving lymphatic flow and enhancing blood circulation, compression therapy can help reduce swelling and edema, thereby improving your recovery process and simultaneously reducing pain and discomfort.

The concurrent use of cryotherapy and compression can enhance the body's innate healing mechanisms by reducing inflammation, mitigating tissue damage, and stimulating tissue repair.

Game Ready's combination therapy has been shown to be effective in improving joint flexibility and range of motion by promoting tissue healing. This treatment can be a great option for those looking to alleviate discomfort and improve overall joint health.

 Headaches And Migraines Therapy Jerseyville, NJ

Whether you're recovering from surgery or you're trying to manage chronic pain in your back or joints, ice compression therapy may be the advanced treatment you need. Contact NJSSW today to learn more about how this treatment can help you live an active life free of pain.

NormaTec Compression Therapy:

A Non-Invasive Option for Enhanced Recovery

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

What Makes NormaTec Compression Therapy Best for Physical Therapy in Cityname, State?

Game Ready Ice Compression Therapy is an advanced treatment technique that combines the advantages of modern cryotherapy (ice therapy) with the proven benefits of compression therapy. This clinically proven, synergistic approach is widely used in sports medicine, physical therapy, orthopedics, and post-operative care to speed up recovery, alleviate pain and inflammation, and enhance rehabilitation.

NormaTec's compression therapy devices have undergone continuous refinement and improvement since their inception. The adjustable settings of their system enable users to regulate the intensity, duration, and pattern of compression, thereby enabling our skilled providers to tailor treatment to suit the specific requirements and comfort levels of each patient.

 Shoulder Pain Therapy Jerseyville, NJ

Experience Holistic Wellness with Cupping Therapy in New Jersey

In the realm of holistic wellness, cupping therapy is a venerable and time-honored practice that has proven to be an effective technique for managing pain and enhancing blood flow. At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we recognize the diverse benefits of cupping therapy, which we offer at both our Matawan and Marlboro, NJ locations.

This ancient technique creates suction on your skin using specialized cups that help promote blood flow, muscle relaxation, and pain relief.

Why is Cupping Therapy Helpful for Physical Therapy in CItyname, State?

 Wrist Pain Therapy Jerseyville, NJ

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we believe that incorporating holistic treatments into physical therapy can greatly benefit our patients. As part of our efforts to alleviate stress and manage chronic pain or conditions, we offer cupping therapy as one of those holistic treatments. This modality has been proven effective and offers numerous benefits for physical therapy, which include:

Cupping therapy can help release muscle tension and relieve back pain. The suction from the cups releases fascial restrictions, decreases muscle tightness, and relieves muscle knots, providing relief from pain caused by muscular tightness or strain.

Our skilled practitioners and physical therapists use modern cupping devices and techniques to create consistent suction on the skin, which stimulates blood flow and encourages oxygen-rich blood to flow into muscles and tissues. This improved circulation can reduce inflammation, remove toxins, and promote healing.

Cupping therapy can relieve back pain by improving circulation, reducing muscle tension, and increasing lymphatic drainage. It's a natural and non-invasive approach that can improve mobility and quality of life.

Cupping therapy uses a gentle suction and pulling sensation that helps ease back pain and reduces stress by creating a calming effect on the body and mind, promoting physical and mental healing.

Reclaim Your Mobility with Physical Therapy in Jerseyville, NJ

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we always prioritize your well-being and offer comprehensive care tailored to your needs. With customized physical therapy tailored to your specific needs, we provide a drug-free, non-invasive, and highly effective treatment path for pain relief and recovery. From tried-and-true techniques to cutting-edge treatments, we're New Jersey's top choice for innovative physical therapy.

Take the first step towards a pain-free, vibrant life by contacting our office today. It all starts by scheduling your initial consultation. With our highly-trained and licensed specialists by your side, you can embrace a brighter, pain-free future.

 Chronic  Pain Therapy Jerseyville, NJ

Schedule An Appointment

Latest News in Jerseyville, NJ

Bitter Last Day As Freehold's Nestle Coffee Plant Finally Closes

FREEHOLD, NJ — The Nestle coffee plant, part of the borough's history for 75 years, saw its last day of production on Friday, company officials confirmed.And the union representing the some 227 employees still at the Jerseyville Avenue plant after its closure was announced in June says the plant's end "leaves a scar in Freehold."For the employees, Teamsters Local 11 President Michael Curcio said the union did its best to negotiate severance packages to help bridge employees to their next jobs.But the clos...

FREEHOLD, NJ — The Nestle coffee plant, part of the borough's history for 75 years, saw its last day of production on Friday, company officials confirmed.

And the union representing the some 227 employees still at the Jerseyville Avenue plant after its closure was announced in June says the plant's end "leaves a scar in Freehold."

For the employees, Teamsters Local 11 President Michael Curcio said the union did its best to negotiate severance packages to help bridge employees to their next jobs.

But the closure at the start of the holiday season hurts, said Curcio.

"We had senators, congressman meeting the company," he said, but ultimately business factors led to the decision in June.

He said as a token of appreciation the company gave employees "a half pound of pasta and an etched glass - '75 years in Freehold'."

So he said he had union stewards at the plant Friday morning to give out 200 turkeys to employees.

"They deserved a hell of a lot more," Curcio said.

The closure on Nov. 17 was announced several months ago and Curcio said some employees already moved on to other jobs. He said a small number of employees will be staying through December to close out operations.

Freehold Mayor Kevin Kane expressed his "continuing disappointment" with the closure of the Nestle Plant in Freehold Borough, saying "large, multinational corporations have little concern for small town America and the people who live here. It’s the end of an era for the borough," he said.

“We need to focus on those people who lost their jobs and their families," he added.

The borough said it is optimistic that a new owner could be found for the property, opening up new possibilities for the community.

"To this end, the borough has commissioned a redevelopment study of the area and is working with the New Jersey Economic Development Authority and state Sen. Vin Gopal to find a new and better use for the facility. The borough is also reviewing groundwater contamination issues for which Nestle remains responsible," the borough said in a statement.

Nestle offered its own thanks to the employees and the town.

“We’re honored to have been part of the Freehold community for the past 75 years," a spokesperson said on Friday.

"Over the past few months we’ve been focused on supporting our employees looking to transition to their next careers. We’ve worked collaboratively with government and Teamsters Local 11 to host job fairs, resume and interview workshops and offer professional headshots," the company said.

Now the property, which is also being remediated environmentally, will be put up for sale and the borough will focus on how to redevelop the area.

This day was looming for employees, who worked with their union to find alternatives, but to no avail.

Nov. 17 had been set as the last day for most employees when the company announced the closure in June.

Before that, there had been discussions with local and state officials, as well as with union leadership of Teamsters Local 11.

The company has said it is utilizing "global" production facilities in its network to support coffee-drinkers' needs:

"Specifically, we intend to further utilize our Veracruz, Mexico and Araras, Brazil sites, which have increasingly been supporting the U.S. volume needs in the past few years," the company said.

The age of the plant and cost of needed upgrades were major factors in the decision.

The company plans to sell the site, as environmental remediation continues

"We are looking to put the property up for sale in Q1 2024," a company spokesman said on Friday.

And the spokesperson added that Nestlé has been engaged in a long-term environmental remediation project from "historic operations" at the Freehold site. "We remain committed to ensuring the completion of remediation."

The Freehold plant has been a mainstay in the borough, and part of its local industry heritage that has seen the gradual decrease in manufacturing facilities.

As one would drive from Route 33 to Jerseyville Avenue, the aroma of coffee steaming from vents at the structure was a sure sign you were nearing downtown Freehold.

According to the borough, the plant pays about $600,000 annually in property taxes and provides over $25 million in ratables.

Nestle remains a "large employer" in New Jersey, where its "employee base has doubled over the past few years,” the company said.

Nestle Health Science has five U.S. locations in New Jersey – its U.S. corporate headquarters in Hoboken, Global Product Technology Center in Bridgewater, a factory in Leonia and two small warehouse facilities, the company said.

The company cited some if its U.S. business investments:

Official floats idea of Jersey County leaving Illinois, becoming part of Missouri

Jacksonville Journal-CourierJERSEYVILLE — A Jersey County board member is asking the county to consider becoming part of Missouri.Eric Ivers asked the board to discuss the issue and consider putting a referendum on the ballot to ask residents if the county should "promote moving the Illinois-Missouri border to make Jersey County a county of Missouri."Ivers said his proposal came after he learned about the movement to split Illinois into two states — one for the Chicago-area counties a...

Jacksonville Journal-Courier

JERSEYVILLE — A Jersey County board member is asking the county to consider becoming part of Missouri.

Eric Ivers asked the board to discuss the issue and consider putting a referendum on the ballot to ask residents if the county should "promote moving the Illinois-Missouri border to make Jersey County a county of Missouri."

Ivers said his proposal came after he learned about the movement to split Illinois into two states — one for the Chicago-area counties and the other for the downstate counties.

The idea of breaking away from Chicago remains popular with people, he said.

But he believes the only feasible way to do that is to change the borders so downstate counties become part of their neighboring states and leave the upper portion of Illinois on its own, he said.

Ivers wants to find out how Jersey County residents feel about the idea. A vote would determine if the residents want the county board to follow through on the possibility of seceding from Illinois and joining Missouri.

If such a vote were to make it to a ballot, it would be in November 2022, Ivers said, noting the idea remains in its early stages.

"There are two options of putting it on the ballot," he said. "The first is to have the board decide as a group to put it on the ballot. The other option ... if the board chooses not to do it is a petition drive to put it on the ballot, which is also a strong possibility."

Before the referendum makes it to the ballot, it would need to overcome some obstacles, including many board members' opposition to the idea. If a petition gained enough signatures — between 850 and 900 — those board members might change their mind, Ivers said.

A political realignment makes sense after much of the state voted for former President Donald Trump over President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election, Ivers said.

Only 13 Illinois counties voted Democratic — eight of them in the Chicago area — but the Chicago region's voter turnout was enough to give the state's electoral votes to Biden.

Ivers' proposal has been tabled by the Jersey County board. Donald Little, the board's chairman, said he has found no legal process by which a county can disassociate itself from one state and associate itself with another.

"I don't think it's a practical idea nor do I think there is a practical process of doing it," Little said.

Little is waiting for further details on the proposal, he said. The board then will consider those details in deciding how to move forward, he said.

Nestlé to close last U.S. coffee plant despite protests from N.J. workers

The 75-year-old Nestlé plant in Freehold will package its last batch of instant coffee this fall as the company moves its coffee production entirely outside the United States.Swiss food and beverage brand Nestlé confirmed Friday that production at the Monmouth County manufacturing plant...

The 75-year-old Nestlé plant in Freehold will package its last batch of instant coffee this fall as the company moves its coffee production entirely outside the United States.

Swiss food and beverage brand Nestlé confirmed Friday that production at the Monmouth County manufacturing plant on Jerseyville Avenue will stop in November and there will be layoffs for the factory’s 227 employees.

The announcement comes just days after workers rallied outside the factory demanding Nestlé keep the facility open instead of outsourcing jobs to another country.

Despite discussions with workers, as well as local and state officials, a Nestlé spokesperson said Friday the company “made the difficult decision” to close the factory.

“We’ve made significant investments in Freehold over the years, but the factory’s many challenges, specifically its age and limited operational flexibility, would cost tens of millions in additional investments to make it viable,” the spokesperson said. “How consumers drink coffee is constantly evolving and our manufacturing network must be set up to meet the needs of consumers now and long into the future.”

The production will move from New Jersey to Nestlé's facilities in Mexico and Brazil, company officials said.

“We intend to further utilize our Veracruz, Mexico, and Araras, Brazil, sites, which have increasingly been supporting the U.S. volume needs in the past few years,” the spokesperson said.

The decision was condemned by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, the largest labor union in the country.

“Without any regard to the livelihoods of 200 workers and their families, Nestlé executives announced today that they will close the Freehold plant,” a Teamsters spokeswoman said in a statement. “This company should be ashamed for turning their backs on workers in Freehold and the community that has been home to this company for more than 70 years.”

Nestlé owns popular labels, including Nespresso, Nescafe and Blue Bottle. The company’s 440,000-square-foot facility in Freehold has served as a landmark and local job-maker since it opened in 1948. The facility is dedicated solely to the production of instant coffee.

Since its opening, the factory has filled Freehold with its trademark coffee aroma and provided employment for generations of families.

But, the Freehold facility has been facing challenges for a while, according to Nestlé. In early May, management told employees the facility was in trouble and might close.

Although the decision announced Friday did not come as a total surprise, it was still disappointing, said Michael Curcio, president of the Freehold factory’s union, Teamsters Local 11.

“Unfortunately, it’s a bad day here in Freehold,” said Curcio. “But, we’re still working the best we can.”

All employees at the Freehold plant will receive comprehensive separation packages “to ease the transition to their next career,” a Nestle spokesperson said.

The last day of work for most employees is scheduled for Nov. 17.

Our journalism needs your support. Please subscribe today to NJ.com.

jroman@njadvancemedia.com.

If you purchase a product or register for an account through a link on our site, we may receive compensation. By using this site, you consent to our User Agreement and agree that your clicks, interactions, and personal information may be collected, recorded, and/or stored by us and social media and other third-party partners in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

Loss Of 200 Jobs At Nestlé Coffee Factory In Freehold On The Table

Employee union says it will do its best to keep 200 jobs in Freehold, as Nestlé holds surprise meeting to discuss future of coffee factory. FREEHOLD, NJ — The global Nestlé corporation is "considering options" for its 75-year-old Freehold coffee factory, and that has set off alarms locally about the future of a major business in the borough.Nestlé may be headquartered in Vevey, Switzerland - also famous for onetime resident and cinema great Charlie Chaplin.But it has a very local im...

Employee union says it will do its best to keep 200 jobs in Freehold, as Nestlé holds surprise meeting to discuss future of coffee factory.

FREEHOLD, NJ — The global Nestlé corporation is "considering options" for its 75-year-old Freehold coffee factory, and that has set off alarms locally about the future of a major business in the borough.

Nestlé may be headquartered in Vevey, Switzerland - also famous for onetime resident and cinema great Charlie Chaplin.

But it has a very local impact on the 227 employees at its instant coffee factory at 61 Jerseyville Ave. on the Freehold/Freehold Township line.

The company has "invited the union to sit down and talk about the future of the site," a company spokesperson said.

For Teamsters Local 11 president Michael Curcio, that announcement came as a surprise. He learned of an employee meeting this week at 3:45 p.m. on Tuesday, he said, and wasn't told what to expect.

Interested in local real estate?Subscribe to Patch's new newsletter to be the first to know about open houses, new listings and more.

While no final decision on the fate of the plant has been made as yet, according to the company, Curcio said he knows he has to be prepared to do his best to keep jobs in Freehold.

"I'm going to fight for my membership," said Curcio, of Teamsters Local 11, based in Haledon.

He said he has contacted Freehold area officials, as well as those at the county and state, including state Sen. Vin Gopal, D-Monmouth.

"I have been made aware of the discussions around the Nestlé factory in Freehold and am actively working with all stakeholders to help in getting to a resolution," Gopal said, including the borough administration, the state Economic Development Authority and Nestlé.

Curcio said he will keep his membership of 200 employees and the public informed of how discussions progress with Nestlé.

"These are just the beginning stages," he said.

According to the company, the discussion includes "an invitation to enter into decisional bargaining, a process through which the union will have the opportunity to offer proposals for our consideration if it chooses to do so," said a Nestlé spokesperson at its American headquarters in Arlington, Va. The spokesperson asked not to be named.

By way of explanation, the spokesperson indicated the aging plant may be an issue for the corporation.

"Although we’ve made investments in Freehold since its opening in 1948, the factory is limited based on its age, flexibility and ability to meet growing consumer demand in a cost-effective way," the spokesperson said.

The company said no "final decision" has been made regarding the factory.

But it acknowledges the turn of events is a concern.

"We recognize this process creates uncertainty for our Freehold team and are committed to providing regular updates and supporting our employees during this process," the company spokesperson said.

Nestlé is a global company with 275,000 employees around the world. Its products are sold in 188 countries, and it operates more than 340 factories in 77 countries, according to internet sources.

No doubt, Nestlé products can be found in nearly every American pantry - from hot cocoa to pet food to Perrier.

But, as with many companies, business demands require a hard look at often aging manufacturing facilities.

"As Nestlé evolves to meet consumer needs now and in the future, we must ensure our manufacturing network is dynamic and set up to support our business," the company spokesperson said.

Meanwhile, area officials are wincing at the news.

The Freehold plant is a mainstay in the borough.

As one would drive from Route 33 to Jerseyville Avenue, the aroma of coffee steaming from vents at the structure was a sure sign you were nearing downtown Freehold.

According to the borough, the plant pays about $600,000 annually in property taxes and provides over $25 million in ratables.

According to Freehold Borough Business Administrator Stephen J. Gallo, the borough received a call from Nestlé's Corporate Affairs director on Tuesday, "advising that they were engaging their unions in discussions about improving efficiency at their Freehold plant."

He said the borough responded by offering to meet to discuss ways in which the borough could be of assistance, including by engaging the resources of the state Economic Development Authority and other government resources.

The company advised the borough that it would like to allow conversations with the union to proceed before considering additional supportive measures, Gallo said Thursday.

"Mayor Kevin A. Kane and the Borough Council hope that discussions with the unions will bear fruit and that Nestlé will remain an important part of the Freehold community. Borough officials stand ready to assist in exploring ways to help keep the business in the borough," Gallo said.

Thomas A. Arnone, director of the Monmouth County Board of County Commissioners, is particularly active in promoting business in the county.

And he says the Nestlé company business is vital to the economy of the county.

"If Nestlé were to close their operations in Freehold, it would have a devastating economic impact on not only the employees who work there, but all of the surrounding businesses," he said in a response Thursday.

"The closure of such a large corporation would be a huge loss for Monmouth County and New Jersey. Hopefully the state will come in and assist Nestlé so they can stay in New Jersey, and importantly, in Monmouth County," Arnone said.

Get more local news delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for free Patch newsletters and alerts.

N.J. has too many damn towns. Here are 25 that need to go.

By Bobby Olivier | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com It's almost spring cleaning season, fellow New Jerseyans, and it's time we broached a familiar and heretofore unresolved issue in this crazy state: there are just waaaay too many towns here.New Jersey comprises 565 municipalities, many of which you drive through in less than a minute having never realized that these blips all feature their own mayor, council members and public works people (or person, in some cases).It stands to reason that fewer public emplo...

By Bobby Olivier | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

It's almost spring cleaning season, fellow New Jerseyans, and it's time we broached a familiar and heretofore unresolved issue in this crazy state: there are just waaaay too many towns here.

New Jersey comprises 565 municipalities, many of which you drive through in less than a minute having never realized that these blips all feature their own mayor, council members and public works people (or person, in some cases).

It stands to reason that fewer public employees on the books would lower taxes in our woefully overtaxed state, so with a blind eye turned to small-town pride — and our tongues in our cheeks, please no threats — here are 25 completely unnecessary New Jersey towns. Merge 'em or wipe 'em off the map completely. Really, who would know the difference?

West New York (Hudson County)

Incorporated: 1898

Population: 52,407

Why it needs to go: To the 50,000 souls who have to regularly explain that they live in a town called West New York, New Jersey, I personally apologize on behalf of all rational human beings. Sure, geographically this makes sense: The one-square-mile Hudson County town is, in fact, due west of New York City. But must you call it that and confuse the hell out of everyone? Nay, says I!

File photo

Teterboro (Bergen County)

Incorporated: 1917

Population: 86

Why it needs to go: Ask anyone in ultra-packed Bergen which of its 70 municipalities is most absurd and you’ll hear about Teterboro, which is little more than an airport and a smattering of businesses. And only 86 people actually live there — if your town’s population is smaller than the guest list at any good Bergen County wedding, you need to merge. Move over, Moonachie.

Hi-Nella (Camden County)

Incorporated: 1929

Population: 895

Why it needs to go: Any town with the audacity to include a hyphen in its name is already on thin ice — I'm looking at you Avon-By-The-Sea — but this faceless quarter-square-mile of land between Somerdale and Stratford is particularly unnecessary. We reported in 2010 that this “town” functions with a double-wide trailer for a town hall and one poor man who acts as the Department of Public Works. Why, Jersey, why?

East Orange, West Orange and South Orange (Essex County)

Incorporated: 1863 (East Orange); 1863 (West Orange); 1869 (South Orange)

Population: 64,621 (East Orange); 47,037 (West Orange); 16,282 (South Orange)

Why it needs to go: The next time I see a sign denoting “The Oranges” exit on the Parkway, it better be for a fruit grove or a farmer’s market. At best, this unnavigable cluster sounds like sectors of a Florida retirement community. Combine them all into Orange, then you can have low sales tax, Seton Hall University and the Turtle Back Zoo all in one place. Everybody wins!

Shrewsbury Twp. (Monmouth County)

Incorporated: 1798

Population: 1,066

Why it needs to go: Welcome to the smallest New Jersey municipality by land area: about one-tenth of a square mile squeezed between Tinton Falls and Shrewsbury Borough. When you hear someone mention Shrewsbury, it’s almost always the borough, not this little blip. New Jersey has a handful of township-versus-borough issues but this one is the most egregious. Eli Manning could almost throw a football across Shrewsbury Township — get rid of it.

Tavistock (Camden County)

Incorporated: 1921

Population: 9

Why it needs to go: You tell me, folks — do we really need a town with 9 people in it? Tavistock borough was founded with the purpose of allowing members of the Tavistock Country Club to hit the links on Sundays. Today, the quarter-square mile burg comprises little more than a golf course. I say merge it with Barrington or Haddon and move on.

File photo

Lower, Middle and Upper (Cape May County)

Incorporated: 1798

Population: 22,272 (Lower); 18,778 (Middle); 12,098 (Upper)

Why it needs to go:

“Hey, where do you live?”

“Lower.”

“Lower what?”

*sigh*

What unimaginative dunce came up with these horrible town names? Do all these nice South Jerseyans a favor and merge these three and give them a cool name, like “Jerseyville” or “Virtually All Of Cape May County” since it covers a huge swath of Jersey’s southern tip.

Lake Como (Monmouth County)

Incorporated: 2005

Population: 1,463

Why it needs to go: If you know the Jersey Shore, you know Lake Como comprises little more than a big pond, the sprawling party spot Bar Anticipation and a handful of residents who endlessly have to explain to friends that they don’t live in Belmar, the beachfront borough that surrounds them on three sides. Lake Como is almost Belmar — it even used to be South Belmar — just make it Belmar already.

Metuchen (Middlesex County)

Incorporated: 1900

Population: 13,791

Why it needs to go: Metuchen is what we call a “doughnut hole” town: This little Central Jersey burg is completely surrounded by another town — drive in any direction and you’ll hit Edison, then tiny Metuchen, then Edison again. How anyone navigated this godforsaken state before GPS is beyond me. Fill the doughnut hole, legislators; Edison could stand another cute downtown.

Pine Valley (Camden County)

Incorporated: 1929

Population: 4

Why it needs to go: Oh good, another purposeless municipality formed from the separation of Clementon Township in 1929. Like Tavistock, Pine Valley is, quite literally, a golf course masquerading as a town. Fore … err … four residents technically live there. FOUR! Pine Valley Golf Club is a well-regarded course, but c’mon, people.

Incorporated: 1895

Population: 2,717

Why it needs to go: Newark is already New Jersey's largest city — why don't we make it a little bigger and cease the insanity of Newark proper existing in Essex County and East Newark lying in Hudson County. Seriously, how strong was the booze back then? And hey, then the glorious Jersey landmark Tops Diner can be part of a real city!

Pohatcong (Warren County)

Incorporated: 1882

Population: 3,254

Why it needs to go: Here we go again: North Jerseyans have to wrestle with Hopatcong, Pohatcong and Lopatcong — say that three times fast. Pohatcong is the smallest of the tricky trio, population-wise, and it’s the hardest to remember. Sorry, Pohatcongers.

Victory Gardens (Morris County)

Incorporated: 1951

Population: 1,623

Why it needs to go: Victory Gardens was created as a World War II housing project built in Randolph for Picatinny Arsenal employees, hence the town’s moniker. Uh, the war’s over, you guys, and Victory Gardens isn’t even two-tenths of a square-mile. The widest section of the town isn’t much larger than the length of MetLife Stadium — and it has its own mayor. Stop the madness!

Loch Arbour (Monmouth County)

Incorporated: 1957

Population: 202

Why it needs to go: I live at the Shore in Monmouth County and I reserve the right to believe that all beachfront property from Route 36 down to Convention Hall should just be considered Long Branch. That means no Deal, no Allenhurst, and definitely no Loch Arbour. Riding my bike, I cross through the fattest section of Loch Arbour in one minute flat. Any town my rusty old Mongoose can make it through in 57 seconds doesn't deserve its own government.

North Plainfield and South Plainfield (Middlesex and Somerset Counties)

Incorporated: 1885 (North Plainfield); 1926 (South Plainfield)

Population: 22,106 (North Plainfield); 23,963 (South Plainfield)

Why it needs to go: Here’s a fun word problem: Vinnie needs to deliver pastrami to delis in Plainfield, North Plainfield and South Plainfield. How many counties does Vinnie visit on his trip? The answer, mind-bogglingly, is three: Plain old Plainfield is part of Union County, North Plainfield lies in Somerset, and South Plainfield in Middlesex. Why? WHY?! I don’t care if they have to redraw county lines, give us one big Plainfield, please.

Rockleigh (Bergen County)

Incorporated: 1923

Population: 588

Why it needs to go: In square mileage, Alaska is about 2,700 times larger than Bergen County, yet it only has about twice as many recognized towns. Think about that for a second and realize that we really don’t need Rockleigh, a ritzy little square of about 600 people and one popular wedding venue. Just combine it with adjacent, celebrity-laden Alpine so a few more people can say they live in the same neighborhood as Chris Rock and Lil’ Kim.

Woodstown (Salem County)

Incorporated:1882

Population: 3,548

Why it needs to go: Way down in Salem County, Woodstown is one-half of the Wood-Pile portmanteau, combining Woodstown — another purposeless doughnut hole town — with the much larger township that completely surrounds it: Pilesgrove, home to the best bar in the state. Wood-Pile needs to just be Pilesgrove and everyone knows it.

South Hackensack (Bergen County)

Incorporated: 1935

Population: 2,724

Why it needs to go: South Hackensack bumps up against Teterboro, creating a useless border between two equally useless towns. Drive in normal Hackensack and you'll need a private investigator to discover when you've actually entered or left South Hackensack. The solution, you ask? Now, this may sound crazy, but why not just, you know, absorb it into THE TOWN IT'S ALREADY NAMED AFTER? Bergen County makes me so angry.

North Caldwell and West Caldwell (Essex County)

Incorporated: 1898 (North Caldwell); 1904 (West Caldwell)

Population: 6,519 (North Caldwell); 10,845 (West Caldwell)

Why it needs to go: So, the Caldwells are named for James Caldwell, a Presbyterian minister who was a spiritual beacon for New Jersey patriots during the Revolutionary War. History describes him as a pretty good dude, but still — he doesn’t need three freaking towns named after him when they could just as easily all be Caldwell. This isn’t an “Oprah” episode where everyone gets to go home with a Caldwell.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
Contact Us