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Advanced Knee Pain Treatment in West Carteret, NJ

Are you experiencing knee pain symptoms such as popping, clicking, bone-on-bone grinding, achiness, or sharp stabs? You're not alone in this journey. Knee pain affects nearly 25% of adults in the United States, causing discomfort, swelling, and chronic pain that can hinder everyday activities like childcare, walking, and exercise. Shockingly, recent statistics from The American Academy of Family Physicians indicate a 65% increase in diagnosed knee pain cases.

In a world where invasive surgeries and prescription painkillers are often the default solutions, it's crucial to explore the effective non-invasive options that are available. These alternative treatments provide relief without the associated risks of surgery.

Today, many doctors still recommend invasive surgeries and prescription painkillers rather than exploring non-invasive options. While those treatments are needed in some circumstances, there are alternative treatments available that can help you overcome knee pain without needing to go under the knife.

NJ Sports Spine and Wellness' advanced knee pain treatment in West Carteret, NJ gives men and women suffering from knee pain hope. Instead of relying on surgery, our team of doctors and physical therapists use non-invasive, highly effective treatments to help heal prevalent conditions such as:

Service Areas

Arthritis

Soft tissue injury

ACL tears

MCL tears

Patella dislocation

Misalignment of the kneecap

Patella tendonitis

Jumper's knee

Osgood Schlatter's Disease

Knee

With the right treatment,

many people can reduce their pain and improve their function, allowing them to return to normal daily activities. Plus, by taking preventative measures and seeking prompt care from our team, it's possible to reduce your risk of developing chronic knee pain and other painful knee conditions. If you've been searching for a non-invasive way to eliminate knee pain and get back to an active life, your journey to recovery starts here.

Let's take a closer look at some of the knee pain treatments available at NJ Sports Spine and Wellness, which all serve as great alternatives to knee replacement surgery.

Physical Therapy:

Optimizing Musculoskeletal Health with Conservative Care

The field of Physical Therapy (PT) aims to rehabilitate individuals who have experienced injury, illness, or disability by restoring their mobility and function. Physical therapists cater to patients of various ages and capabilities, ranging from young athletes to senior citizens, in order to help them surpass physical limitations and improve their standard of living with advanced knee pain treatment in West Carteret, NJ.

At NJ Sports Spine and Wellness, our physical therapy program was founded on a patient-centric philosophy, where physical therapists work closely with patients to get a deep understanding of their goals, preferences, and capabilities. In doing so, they can create a tailor-made treatment strategy to address their unique knee pain with the goal of avoiding a knee replacement. Treatment may involve exercises that are therapeutic in nature and can include:

  • Joint mobilizations
  • Soft tissue mobilization using cupping
  • Graston technique
  • Soft tissue massage
  • Stretching of associated muscle groups

Joint Mobilization for Knee Pain

This unique knee pain solution involves physical therapists using skilled manual therapy techniques to help improve your joint range of motion while simultaneously reducing your knee pain.

During joint mobilization, a physical therapist applies targeted pressures or forces to a joint in specific directions to improve its mobility. The intensity of the force applied can vary, and it is adjusted based on the patient's comfort level. Joint mobilization is generally pain-free.

STM

Soft Tissue Mobilization (STM)

Soft Tissue Mobilization is a manual therapy technique that involves stretching and applying deep pressure to rigid muscle tissue. This helps to relax muscle tension and move fluids that are trapped in the tissues that cause pain and inflammation. This effective form of physical therapy is often used as an advanced knee pain treatment in West Carteret, NJ for treating knee strains, knee sprains, knee pain, and more.

Graston

The Graston Technique

The Graston Technique involves the use of handheld instruments to identify and break up scar tissue through specialized massage. During a Graston Technique session, physical therapists use convex and concave tools for cross-friction massage, which involves rubbing or brushing against the grain of the scar tissue. This process re-introduces small amounts of trauma to the affected area. In some cases, this process temporarily causes inflammation, which can actually boost the amount and rate of blood flow in the knee. This process helps initiate and promote the healing process so you can get back to a normal life.

Massage

Soft Tissue Massage

Soft tissue massage is a less intense form of massage than it's deep-tissue relative. Instead of focusing on slow and firm strokes to reach the deep layers of muscles and tissues, this massage technique uses a variety of pressures, depths, and durations. Soft tissue massage is helpful in alleviating different types of knee aches, pains, and injuries. Soft tissue massages can also help reduce stress, improve circulation, and promote relaxation.

Advanced Mechanics and Technology:

The Future of Knee Pain Therapy

While knee pain is a common symptom that affects millions of Americans every year, no two cases of knee pain are ever exactly alike. Some types of knee injuries require non-traditional solutions. At New Jersey Sports Spine and Wellness, we offer a range of treatments that leverage mechanics and technology to help patients recover from injuries while treating inflammation and pain as well as resolve the root cause of the pain.

AlterAlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill is equipped with NASA Differential Air Pressure (DAP) technology, which is a precise air calibration system that uses the user's actual body weight to enhance rehabilitation and training. By utilizing a pressurized air chamber, the AlterG allows patients and athletes to move without any pain or restrictions.

This advanced knee pain treatment in West Carteret, NJ uniformly reduces gravitational load and body weight up to 80% in precise 1% increments. The results can be incredible, with patients reporting benefits such as:

  • Restoring and building of knee strength
  • Restored range of motion in the knee
  • Better balance
  • Improved knee function
  • More

What Makes the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill So Effective?

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill can monitor various metrics such as speed, gait pattern, stride length, and weight distribution. With real-time feedback and video monitoring, your rehabilitation team can promptly and accurately identify issues and pain points or monitor your progress throughout your knee pain rehabilitation journey.

One of the key benefits of this cutting-edge equipment is that it replicates natural walking and movement patterns without the artificial feel that hydrotherapy or harnesses create. This makes it an excellent choice for faster recovery after knee injuries or surgeries, as it allows for early mobilization while also preserving strength. Furthermore, it is ideal for sports recovery as athletes can use it for physical conditioning maintenance.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ
Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

Low-Level Laser Therapy

Our advanced treatment modalities for knee pain include laser therapy, which harnesses the revolutionary power of light through photobiomodulation (PBM). LiteCureâ„¢ low-level laser therapy is available for acute and chronic types of knee pain and can be hugely beneficial when coupled with physical therapy, occupational therapy, chiropractic care, and sports recovery care.

Understanding Photobiomodulation (PBM)

PBM is a medical treatment that harnesses the power of light to stimulate the body's natural healing abilities. The photons from the light penetrate deep into the tissue and interact with mitochondria, which results in a boost in energy production. This interaction sets off a biological chain reaction that increases cellular metabolism. Utilizing low-level light therapy has been shown to:

  • Alleviate knee pain
  • Speed up tissue healing
  • Promote overall health and wellness
  • Expedite knee pain injury recovery
Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

Exclusive Access to

Pain Management Professionals

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we know that every patient requires a personalized approach to chronic knee pain and condition management. Sometimes, our patients need access to pain management professionals, who can offer relief in conjunction with physical therapy and other solutions like low-level laser therapy.

Two of the most common services we offer for pain management includes acupuncture which can assist in avoiding knee replacement surgery.

Acupuncture is a common treatment for knee pain that involves inserting thin needles into specific points in your knee. This ancient Chinese medicine has gained popularity in Western culture due to its effectiveness in treating various conditions with minimal side effects.

Acupuncture works by stimulating the nervous system to release various biochemicals, including endorphins and other neurotransmitters. The release of these chemicals helps to reduce inflammation, decrease pain perception, and improve overall blood circulation.

Multiple studies have shown that acupuncture can be effective in treating knee pain caused by a variety of conditions, including osteoarthritis and injuries related to physical activity like running. Acupuncture can also help reduce inflammation, improve muscle function, and decrease pain perception, making it a viable treatment on its own or as an addition to traditional treatment methods like physical therapy.

When undergoing acupuncture, a professional acupuncturist will insert thin needles into specific acupoints on the skin. These needles are left in place for roughly 20 to 30 minutes and may be gently stimulated for an enhanced effect. Patients might experience a slight tingle or warmth at the needle insertion site, but overall, acupuncture is considered a painless procedure.

Acupuncture has been a trusted and effective treatment option for thousands of years. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes acupuncture as a legitimate form of healthcare, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has even funded research studies to explore its efficacy for a range of medical conditions. To learn more about acupuncture for knee pain, contact NJSSW today.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a common treatment for knee pain that involves inserting thin needles into specific points in your knee. This ancient Chinese medicine has gained popularity in Western culture due to its effectiveness in treating various conditions with minimal side effects.

Acupuncture works by stimulating the nervous system to release various biochemicals, including endorphins and other neurotransmitters. The release of these chemicals helps to reduce inflammation, decrease pain perception, and improve overall blood circulation.

Multiple studies have shown that acupuncture can be effective in treating knee pain caused by a variety of conditions, including osteoarthritis and injuries related to physical activity like running. Acupuncture can also help reduce inflammation, improve muscle function, and decrease pain perception, making it a viable treatment on its own or as an addition to traditional treatment methods like physical therapy.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

What Happens During Acupuncture Therapy for Knee Pain?

When undergoing acupuncture, a professional acupuncturist will insert thin needles into specific acupoints on the skin. These needles are left in place for roughly 20 to 30 minutes and may be gently stimulated for an enhanced effect. Patients might experience a slight tingle or warmth at the needle insertion site, but overall, acupuncture is considered a painless procedure.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

Is Acupuncture Actually Effective for Knee Pain?

Acupuncture has been a trusted and effective treatment option for thousands of years. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes acupuncture as a legitimate form of healthcare, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has even funded research studies to explore its efficacy for a range of medical conditions. To learn more about acupuncture for knee pain, contact NJSSW today.

Avoid Knee Replacements with Advanced Knee Pain Treatment in West Carteret, NJ

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

When it comes to knee pain therapies and treatments, getting a knee replacement should be last on your list. Why put your body through such trauma if you haven't tried other non-invasive treatment options? Whether you're an athlete trying to work through a knee injury or you're over 65 and are dealing with osteoarthritis, NJ Sports Spine and Wellness can help.

It all starts with an introductory consultation at our office in Matawan or Marlboro. During your first visit, we'll talk to you about your knee pain symptoms, the goals you have in mind, and the advanced knee pain treatments available to you at our practice. From there, it's only a matter of time before you get back to a healthy, active lifestyle.

Every day you wait can worsen your knee condition. Contact us today and let our team help get you on the road to recovery and life with painful knees.

Latest News in West Carteret, NJ

For 28 Years, New Jersey Was Two Different States

“North, South, or Central?”… said nobody 300 years ago. Today, we use linguistic differences like the Taylor ham-pork roll debate to draw the line or major highways like I-295 (personally, I say it’s I-78), but for a 28-year period, the question was whether you fell on East New Jersey or West New Jersey. The two were so separate that they had different governors and even different constitutions. Here’s a brief summary of the almost three decades that New Jersey was two different states.Background...

“North, South, or Central?”… said nobody 300 years ago. Today, we use linguistic differences like the Taylor ham-pork roll debate to draw the line or major highways like I-295 (personally, I say it’s I-78), but for a 28-year period, the question was whether you fell on East New Jersey or West New Jersey. The two were so separate that they had different governors and even different constitutions. Here’s a brief summary of the almost three decades that New Jersey was two different states.

Background

Following the Anglo-Dutch War over the region, the Province of New Jersey was granted to England in 1674. It was split into two distinct parts, East and West Jersey, governed by Sir George Carteret and Lord John Berkeley, respectively.

After a long line of the proprietors’ debts and subsequent property transfers, East and West Jersey called for the creation of a formal border. Several lines were proposed, all of which drew a diagonal starting at Little Egg Harbor going northwest. Lines were adjusted for settlers’ property boundaries.

East and West Jersey

East Jersey quickly organized itself into counties based on the seven main towns: Bergen (now Jersey City), Elizabethtown (Elizabeth), Newark, Woodbridge, Piscataqua (Piscataway), Shrewsbury, and Middletown. The resulting counties were Bergen, Essex, Middlesex, and Monmouth. Familiar names like Hacksack (Hackensack), Freehold, and Perth Amboy, which became the capital of East Jersey, also made their debut at this time. Somerset County was also created but was categorized as a township.

West Jersey wouldn’t officially form counties for a bit longer. Instead, they went by court jurisdictions. Proprietors divided all of West Jersey into tenths, possibly rooted in the province’s strong Quaker ties. The tenths were overseen by courts: Burlington, Gloucester, Salem, and Cape May. Sound familiar? They would eventually become counties, too.

Reunification

Property struggles heightened tensions as land owners, English authorities, and local residents fought over land. Royal decrees had to be sent out detailing the proprietors’ right to the soil. Eventually, proprietors in the East and West both forfeited their land to the crown, placing James Duke of York as the governor of both New Jersey and New York. At one point, it was even considered to cede West Jersey to Pennsylvania and East Jersey to New York, which may explain some cultural differences throughout modern-day NJ.

Legacy

Today, the earliest proposed line, the Keith Line, serves as the border between Burlington and Ocean counties, as well as Hunterdon and Somerset counties. The following border, the Coxe-Barclay Line, now denotes the border of Morris, Somerset, and Sussex counties. The border would be surveyed a few more times until the Lawrence Line was drawn in 1743 to clean up any remaining disputes.

One might even argue that dividing the state East and West still holds up better than North and South. As seen in a map of sports teams, fandoms fall eerily close to the borders drawn over 300 years ago. Linguistic boundaries are similar. Ultimately, it comes down to proximity to New York or Philly, and in that case, East and West seems to be the dominant divider, not North and South. But after all of this, should New Jersey have stayed two different states? I say no. The divide is what makes Jersey, well, Jersey. The need to argue with one another, that’s what makes us all from this great state.

Woodbridge Gets ‘Sneak Peek’ at Mayor’s 2024 ‘State of the Township’

Photo Credit: WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIPPhoto Credit: RUSSO DEVELOPMENTPhoto Credit: WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIPA 2015 overview of Woodbridge Waterfront Park, a 100-acre passive recreation area off Industrial Highway, billed as the single-largest environmental restoration effort ever made along the Raritan River. It should be open to the public before the summer of 2024.Photo Credit: COURTESY of GREAT ECOLOGYThe Woodbridge Municipal Building, in the heart of this suburban community, that is making an eff...

Photo Credit: WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP

Photo Credit: RUSSO DEVELOPMENT

Photo Credit: WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP

A 2015 overview of Woodbridge Waterfront Park, a 100-acre passive recreation area off Industrial Highway, billed as the single-largest environmental restoration effort ever made along the Raritan River. It should be open to the public before the summer of 2024.Photo Credit: COURTESY of GREAT ECOLOGY

The Woodbridge Municipal Building, in the heart of this suburban community, that is making an effort to attract more redevelopment investors to revitalize and bring new downtown restaurants and retailers. Photo Credit: WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP

By TONY GALLOTTO

WOODBRIDGE, NJ — Mayor John E. McCormac highlighted his administration’s – and the town’s recent major accomplishments – at the Woodbridge Economic Development Corporation’s annual "Celebration of Success” conference.

The mayor billed his 30-minute narrated video presentation as a preview of the 2024 “State of the Township” address, which he ordinarily delivers in late January.

However, McCormac said his 2024 speech will be postponed until the end of February 2024 – tentatively Friday, Feb. 23rd – because of a happy family obligation: The due-date for his first grandchild’s birth. A milestone McCormac said he “would never miss.’’

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So, the mayor gave business leaders, developers and builders, attorneys, architects, engineers and others a snapshot of Woodbridge’s most recent successes. Watch complete coverage from Woodbridge Channel 35:

Center stage for the mayor’s presentation were recent and upcoming downtown developments; significant projects in Avenel and Iselin; and new waterfront recreation projects in Keaseby and Sewaren.

McCormac also promoted the sensible way that Woodbridge uses “payments-in-lieu-of-taxes” (PILOTs), an often-criticized state-approved practice since the 1970s in New Jersey.

He explained that Woodbridge received over $26 million from PILOT revenue for its current $206 million municipal budget. That, he said, equates to a $700 savings per household, and enabled the town to build a record cash surplus of nearly $17 million.

The recent annual Woodbridge Economic Development Corp. (WEDCO) conference was held at the township-owned Avenel Performing Arts Center, 150 Avenel St., which McCormac said will host a wider selection of events and performances in 2024.

The performing arts center, opened in 2019, and nearby Curtains Restaurant are what McCormac called “a fantastic example of what is happening” as Woodbridge attracts more new luxury apartment projects to town.

“When (we) bring luxury apartments, things like this, and new retail (stores) happen,” McCormac said, attributing many of Avenel’s other new commercial investments to the nearly 500 luxury apartments and townhouses at the Station Village at Avenel. It opened in 2017 to replace the long-abandoned 27-acre General Dynamics industrial complex.

IN AVENEL

Mayor McCormac highlighted:

● Renovations to established businesses like Sorrento’s and Rocko’s Pizza; newcomers like Jersey Pizza Boys; and the proposed Cloverleaf Shopping Center, with stores like Sketcher’s and Sprout’s Farm Market.

● A new 104-room Cambria Hotel to be built on vacant lots at 939-943 Route 1.

● A proposed marijuana dispensary that will replace the Avenel Variety Center on Route 1 South.

IN ISELIN

The mayor told WEDCO conference-goers that Oak Tree Road in Iselin is an “underappreciated” jewel that has emerged as one of the state’s premier, “stunningly beautiful” shopping districts in the heart of the town’s Indian-American community. He highlighted:

● The area’s growing number of restaurants, stores and services that attract visitors from across the state to Woodbridge, an economic boost.

● Internationally-known Malabar Gold & Diamonds, one of its only five U.S. retail stores.

Tanishq Jewelers, a major go-to jewelry retailer for the Asian-Indian community.

IN DOWNTOWN

The mayor said new downtown developments “are about half there,” as he underscored new residential projects that are attracting new restaurants and stores, boosting Woodbridge’s commercial tax base. Among them, McCormac cited:

Vermella-Woodbridge, 376 luxury apartments on Main Street in the heart of downtown, with Angelina’s Kitchen, to open on its ground-floor. Vermella was built by Russo Development of Carlstadt and Onyx Equities LLC of Woodbridge.

Modera-Woodbridge, a 279-unit upscale transit-oriented, six-story complex at 10 Main Street, near the downtown train station. The project was built by Mill Creek Residential Trust LLC., of West Hempstead, NY.

● New restaurants like Strickland’s Steakhouse, in the former National Bank building at 106 Main Street; $3 million worth of renovation to the Woodbridge Brew Pub; and newcomers like Playa Bowl, Siwa Tai Restaurant, Shinko Hibachi Japanese Steakhouse, El Ranchito, Cheng's Kitchen, Il Castello's, and Waka-Tay’s Peruvian cuisine eatery.

“We’ve made many strides at bringing businesses (to downtown), and that’s because of the apartments coming to town,” the mayor said.

Read: New Woodbridge Restaurants Add Flavor to Main Street

ON THE WATERFRONT

Woodbridge plans to open two new waterfront recreation venues in 2024, one long-awaited along the Raritan River in Keasbey and the other at the town’s Sewaren Marina, McCormac said.

● Construction is underway for $4 million worth of improvements to the Sewaren Marina & Recreation Center on Smith’s Creek, a deep stream that leads a half-mile to the Arthur Kill. The project includes construction of a 215-seat outdoor Tiki Bar with an outdoor stage for live performances; parking for food trucks; and creating a “living shoreline” off Cliff Road to restore its natural habitat and halt erosion.

The project, funded almost entirely with grants, will add 25 more boat slips to the 77 already at the marina; add 11 “dock-and-dine” slips, so boaters can briefly stop to buy food and refreshments; double the size of a nearby municipal dog park; and Middlesex County will build a walking bridge to connect the marina to nearby Alvin P. Williams County Park.

Read: Woodbridge Launches $4 Million ‘Tiki Bar’ Project at Sewaren Marina

● Woodbridge Waterfront Park, a 100-acre passive recreation area off Industrial Highway and along the Raritan River. It includes walking trails through 30 acres of restored wetlands and uplands, six acres of ponds, a boardwalk and viewing platforms; bird blinds for observing wildlife, seated gathering areas, parking for school outings and field trips.

The park – a “brownfield to greenfield project” – is the single-largest environmental restoration effort ever done along the Raritan River. Its 100 acres are carved from the 186-acre former Nuodex property that closed in 1984 and was acquired in 1991 by Texas-based EPEC Polymers, which agreed to restore it for public and business use. The park is complete and awaiting final approval to open from the state Department of Environmental Protection, the mayor said.

About 50 acres of the former Nuodex site is now home to CPV-Woodbridge Energy Center, a $1 billion natural gas-fired electricity-generating plant; a FedEx Ground Transportation Terminal; and a Wakefern Food Corp. distribution center.

The 10,000 NJ Teachers Who Make $99K Or More In 2019

Here are the 10,000-plus top-paid NJ public school teachers, a growing club earning $100K-plus a year. Below is the list/their districts. |Updated Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 1:06 pm ETNEW JERSEY – Teachers' salaries are rising again, and six-figure salaries are no longer uncommon for educators in New Jersey. In fact, nearly 10,000 teachers make $100,000 or more. Patch has the list of 10,000-plus top-earning teachers and their salaries in 2019 below.The Department of Education has released its annual list of teachers and...

Here are the 10,000-plus top-paid NJ public school teachers, a growing club earning $100K-plus a year. Below is the list/their districts.

|Updated Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 1:06 pm ET

NEW JERSEY – Teachers' salaries are rising again, and six-figure salaries are no longer uncommon for educators in New Jersey. In fact, nearly 10,000 teachers make $100,000 or more. Patch has the list of 10,000-plus top-earning teachers and their salaries in 2019 below.

The Department of Education has released its annual list of teachers and their salaries for 2019. And the list of educators making $100,000 or more — a list that barely had any teachers on it more than a decade ago — has grown in recent years.

It's also a small fraction of the more than 100,000 people who teach in public and charter schools in this state. But the highest earners also come from all different schools — not just the so-called "wealthy" districts that routinely rank highly on national and state lists for best schools.

(If you want to find teachers in your district, scroll through the lists that are divided based on experience below).

The data is from the 2018-2019 school year, the most recent year available. In 2018-2019, the median salary for teachers totaled $68,985, according to a Patch analysis of salary data for public school districts and charter schools. The amount was about 1.6 percent higher than the previous year (see list below).

Find out what's happening in Point Pleasantwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

The Department of Education has said the department double-checks the data before delivering it to the media.

Here are the more than 10,000 teachers who earn the top salaries, with their school, their school district and county and, finally, their salaries (the teachers have been divided by their years of experience):

50 years or more of experience:

40 to 49 years of experience:

30 to 39 years of experience:

20 to 29 years of experience:

10 to 19 years of experience:

5 to 9 years of experience:

2 to 4 years of experience:

Less than 2 years of experience:

Get more local news delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for free Patch newsletters and alerts.

Long-Awaited Woodbridge Steakhouse Opens on Main Street

Photo Credit: WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIPPhoto Credit: STRICKLAND’S STEAKHOUSE/FACEBOOKPhoto Credit: STRICKLAND’S STEAKHOUSE/FACEBOOKPhoto Credit: STRICKLAND’S STEAKHOUSE/FACEBOOKThe bar at Strickland's Steakhouse also had a busy opening night on Friday, Sept. 8th. Photo Credit: STRICKLAND’S STEAKHOUSE/FACEBOOKLong-awaited, family-owned Strickland's Steakhouse is now officially open at 106 Main Street in downtown Woodbridge, NJ.Photo Credit: STRICKLAND&rsquo...

Photo Credit: WOODBRIDGE TOWNSHIP

Photo Credit: STRICKLAND’S STEAKHOUSE/FACEBOOK

Photo Credit: STRICKLAND’S STEAKHOUSE/FACEBOOK

Photo Credit: STRICKLAND’S STEAKHOUSE/FACEBOOK

The bar at Strickland's Steakhouse also had a busy opening night on Friday, Sept. 8th. Photo Credit: STRICKLAND’S STEAKHOUSE/FACEBOOK

Long-awaited, family-owned Strickland's Steakhouse is now officially open at 106 Main Street in downtown Woodbridge, NJ.Photo Credit: STRICKLAND’S STEAKHOUSE

By TONY GALLOTTO

WOODBRIDGE, NJ — Family-owned Strickland's Steakhouse is now officially open for business in downtown’s old Woodbridge National Bank after new owners gave the 1927 building a thoroughly modern makeover.

Now one of many new Main Street eateries, Strictland’s Steakhouse is being called “the cornerstone” of what Mayor John E. McCormac sees as a downtown “destination dining experience” for residents and visitors alike.

McCormac says Main Street’s restaurant renaissance is happening because of the many new luxury apartments, already built and yet to come.

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“High-end apartments are leading to high-end restaurants and shops, making Main Street more vibrant right before our eyes,” the mayor said.

Strickland's Steakhouse, 106 Main St., had a “soft opening” a few weeks ago. It hosted a black-tie grand opening Friday, Sept. 8th, with the mayor and other local officials on hand for the ribbon-cutting. The glitzy affair can be seen here on a Woodbridge Channel 35 video:

Opening a Woodbridge steakhouse has been a goal for 37-year-old owner Michael C. Strickland, a lifelong Port Reading resident, and his wife Jessica. Strickland also owns the West Shore Inn Steakhouse and the Fig & Vine Restaurant, both in Staten Island.

“I always wanted to open (a restaurant) in town. When the opportunity arose, I was all-in after I heard what was coming (to downtown),” referring to upscale redevelopment projects. “It made (my decision) a no-brainer,” Strickland said at the grand opening.

Initially proposed in 2021, bank renovations fell victim to Covid-19 setbacks, and eventual supply chain delays. That made tough to get construction materials, commercial appliances, and basics like tables and chairs.

“It was a long road to get here, but we are here now,” said Strickland, crediting his wife Jessica for choosing the steakhouse’s bank-themed artwork, décor, and creating its ambiance.

The new restaurant, at 106 Main St., “is a vision I had in mind. It’s absolutely a dream come true to see it come to life,” said Jessica Strickland, who designed the steakhouse to retain “the history and integrity of this building.”

That in mind, Jessica said: “We have menu items and craft cocktails that go with banks. Much of the artwork is ‘bank-robber themed,’ so our customers feel like they’re sitting in a piece of history.”

The steakhouse serves farm-to-table foods, melt-in-your-mouth elite prime steak with a medley of fresh veggies, and many seafood entrées, the Stricklands said.

MORE RESTAURANTS COMING

Mayor McCormac says Strickland's Steakhouse is perhaps “the most anticipated (business) grand opening in Woodbridge that I can remember in my entire career as mayor,” predicting it would be cornerstone for downtown’s newest eateries.

Coming soon to Main Street will be Lenihan’s Irish Pub, now renovating 78 Main St.; Mexology, that will serve contemporary Mexican cuisine; Angelina’s Kitchen, on the ground floor of “Vermella,” a 376-apartment Main Street luxury complex; and a few other restaurants that Woodbridge officials say they are not ready to divulge.

These are in addition to Playa Bowl, that opened in May at 97 Main St.; Siwa Tai at 116 Main St.; El Ranchito Restaurant, 51B Main St. Cheng's Kitchen, 71 Main St.; Il Castello's, 81 Main St.; San Remo Pizza, 87 Main St.; Waka-Tay, 98 Main St.; Holy Cow Cookies & Cream, 114B Main St.; and Ristorante Venezia,112 Main St., a well-established fine dining experience for nearly four decades.

Mayor McCormac says existing and proposed downtown luxury apartments are fueling interest by restaurateurs and new storeowners; and they are generating pedestrian foot-traffic looking for places to shop and eat. “Let’s face it, we took a lot of heat for all these new apartments, but they are paying dividends to our community.”

“If we didn’t have downtown the luxury apartments (with) people walking around with money in their pockets … who can afford $2,500 for one-bedroom apartment(s), this would not have happened,” the mayor said at the grand opening.

AT THE OPENING

On hand for Strickland's’s grand opening were Holly Church-Doyle, executive director of the Metro Chamber of Commerce; Marta Lefsky, the township planning director; Caroline Ehrilich, the mayor’s chief of staff and local redevelopment agency director; and Councilwoman Sharon McAuliffe.

Also appearing on opening night was former Rutgers University football player Eric LeGrand, a fellow business owner and Avenel resident. He opened LeGrand Coffee House in Woodbridge in 2022, and this year launched LeGrand Whiskey, with a Kentucky straight bourbon that he brought along to Strickland’s.

Church-Doyle says she and Councilwoman McAuliffe recently dined at Strickland's, calling the restaurant “phenomenal,” and saying “Mike and Jessica family-oriented, kind, generous, and above all, nice people.”

Citing a line from 1989’s “Field of Dreams,” Church-Doyle said Woodbridge’s new apartments are proof that “if you build it, they will come,” saying more new restaurants on their way to downtown.

McAuliffe, who pledges to reopen her long-awaited “Knot Just Bagels,” in a new location at 93 Main St., has a special connection to Mike Strickland, who she hired when he was just 14-years-old at her original shop in downtown.

McAuliffe recalled Strickland as a hard-working young man who “did whatever was asked of him,” and she said he ate the same sandwich for lunch so often that her menu will still include a sandwich called “The Strickland.”

To learn more about Strickland’s Steakhouse visit its website or its Facebook page.

Contact Tony Gallotto at tgallotto@tapinto.net with news tips or interesting feature ideas.

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Carteret Stabbing Victim’s Family Seeks Help

Family photo of Ryan Nelan with his son Jared.Photo Credit: Courtney Nelan/GoFundMePublishedJune 10, 2022 at 12:32 PMCARTERET, NJ — The sister of a 36-year-old borough man, stabbed twice in his skull when he intervened in an April 5 domestic dispute, is seeking help for the long-term medical care she says her brother will need.Courtney Nelan, sister of Ryan Nelan, has started a ...

Family photo of Ryan Nelan with his son Jared.Photo Credit: Courtney Nelan/GoFundMe

PublishedJune 10, 2022 at 12:32 PM

CARTERET, NJ — The sister of a 36-year-old borough man, stabbed twice in his skull when he intervened in an April 5 domestic dispute, is seeking help for the long-term medical care she says her brother will need.

Courtney Nelan, sister of Ryan Nelan, has started a GoFundMe page with an ambitious $100,000 goal for her brother who is now a patient at Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation in West Orange. The online appeal has so far generated about $3,800 in pledges.

“Ryan is making progress, but he may never be the same as before,” said Courtney, 33, of South River. She said knife wounds to his head damaged his brain; he may not walk or drive again; and need “someone to help him do everything from using the bathroom to doing physical therapy,” she said.

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Police said Nelan was slashed on his arm and stabbed in his head with a folding knife on April 5 when he intervened in a neighbor’s domestic dispute on Essex Street.

Nelan was rushed to Newark University Hospital for treatment, underwent surgeries, and remained hospitalized for several weeks before he was moved to the rehab facility.

Two weeks after the incident, Carteret detectives and federal marshals found and arrested the alleged assailant, Manuel Rodriguez, 26, of Carteret, taking him into custody at a restaurant in Camden.

Rodriguez was charged with aggravated assault, unlawful weapons possession, and endangering a child’s welfare. He has since been released on bail from the county jail.

Courtney Nelan described her brother as a kind person and “a hero,” who was severely injured “just being a Good Samaritan.” She worries that he is getting depressed about his future once he is well enough to leave the rehabilitation center.

Before the incident, Nelan was an unemployed, single father who “struggled with addiction, but (he) was getting to get his life together,” Courtney said. “Then, this happened.”

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