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Advanced Knee Pain Treatment in West Carteret, NJ

Are you experiencing knee pain symptoms such as popping, clicking, bone-on-bone grinding, achiness, or sharp stabs? You're not alone in this journey. Knee pain affects nearly 25% of adults in the United States, causing discomfort, swelling, and chronic pain that can hinder everyday activities like childcare, walking, and exercise. Shockingly, recent statistics from The American Academy of Family Physicians indicate a 65% increase in diagnosed knee pain cases.

In a world where invasive surgeries and prescription painkillers are often the default solutions, it's crucial to explore the effective non-invasive options that are available. These alternative treatments provide relief without the associated risks of surgery.

Today, many doctors still recommend invasive surgeries and prescription painkillers rather than exploring non-invasive options. While those treatments are needed in some circumstances, there are alternative treatments available that can help you overcome knee pain without needing to go under the knife.

NJ Sports Spine and Wellness' advanced knee pain treatment in West Carteret, NJ gives men and women suffering from knee pain hope. Instead of relying on surgery, our team of doctors and physical therapists use non-invasive, highly effective treatments to help heal prevalent conditions such as:

Service Areas

Arthritis

Soft tissue injury

ACL tears

MCL tears

Patella dislocation

Misalignment of the kneecap

Patella tendonitis

Jumper's knee

Osgood Schlatter's Disease

Knee

With the right treatment,

many people can reduce their pain and improve their function, allowing them to return to normal daily activities. Plus, by taking preventative measures and seeking prompt care from our team, it's possible to reduce your risk of developing chronic knee pain and other painful knee conditions. If you've been searching for a non-invasive way to eliminate knee pain and get back to an active life, your journey to recovery starts here.

Let's take a closer look at some of the knee pain treatments available at NJ Sports Spine and Wellness, which all serve as great alternatives to knee replacement surgery.

Physical Therapy:

Optimizing Musculoskeletal Health with Conservative Care

The field of Physical Therapy (PT) aims to rehabilitate individuals who have experienced injury, illness, or disability by restoring their mobility and function. Physical therapists cater to patients of various ages and capabilities, ranging from young athletes to senior citizens, in order to help them surpass physical limitations and improve their standard of living with advanced knee pain treatment in West Carteret, NJ.

At NJ Sports Spine and Wellness, our physical therapy program was founded on a patient-centric philosophy, where physical therapists work closely with patients to get a deep understanding of their goals, preferences, and capabilities. In doing so, they can create a tailor-made treatment strategy to address their unique knee pain with the goal of avoiding a knee replacement. Treatment may involve exercises that are therapeutic in nature and can include:

  • Joint mobilizations
  • Soft tissue mobilization using cupping
  • Graston technique
  • Soft tissue massage
  • Stretching of associated muscle groups

Joint Mobilization for Knee Pain

This unique knee pain solution involves physical therapists using skilled manual therapy techniques to help improve your joint range of motion while simultaneously reducing your knee pain.

During joint mobilization, a physical therapist applies targeted pressures or forces to a joint in specific directions to improve its mobility. The intensity of the force applied can vary, and it is adjusted based on the patient's comfort level. Joint mobilization is generally pain-free.

STM

Soft Tissue Mobilization (STM)

Soft Tissue Mobilization is a manual therapy technique that involves stretching and applying deep pressure to rigid muscle tissue. This helps to relax muscle tension and move fluids that are trapped in the tissues that cause pain and inflammation. This effective form of physical therapy is often used as an advanced knee pain treatment in West Carteret, NJ for treating knee strains, knee sprains, knee pain, and more.

Graston

The Graston Technique

The Graston Technique involves the use of handheld instruments to identify and break up scar tissue through specialized massage. During a Graston Technique session, physical therapists use convex and concave tools for cross-friction massage, which involves rubbing or brushing against the grain of the scar tissue. This process re-introduces small amounts of trauma to the affected area. In some cases, this process temporarily causes inflammation, which can actually boost the amount and rate of blood flow in the knee. This process helps initiate and promote the healing process so you can get back to a normal life.

Massage

Soft Tissue Massage

Soft tissue massage is a less intense form of massage than it's deep-tissue relative. Instead of focusing on slow and firm strokes to reach the deep layers of muscles and tissues, this massage technique uses a variety of pressures, depths, and durations. Soft tissue massage is helpful in alleviating different types of knee aches, pains, and injuries. Soft tissue massages can also help reduce stress, improve circulation, and promote relaxation.

Advanced Mechanics and Technology:

The Future of Knee Pain Therapy

While knee pain is a common symptom that affects millions of Americans every year, no two cases of knee pain are ever exactly alike. Some types of knee injuries require non-traditional solutions. At New Jersey Sports Spine and Wellness, we offer a range of treatments that leverage mechanics and technology to help patients recover from injuries while treating inflammation and pain as well as resolve the root cause of the pain.

AlterAlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill is equipped with NASA Differential Air Pressure (DAP) technology, which is a precise air calibration system that uses the user's actual body weight to enhance rehabilitation and training. By utilizing a pressurized air chamber, the AlterG allows patients and athletes to move without any pain or restrictions.

This advanced knee pain treatment in West Carteret, NJ uniformly reduces gravitational load and body weight up to 80% in precise 1% increments. The results can be incredible, with patients reporting benefits such as:

  • Restoring and building of knee strength
  • Restored range of motion in the knee
  • Better balance
  • Improved knee function
  • More

What Makes the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill So Effective?

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill can monitor various metrics such as speed, gait pattern, stride length, and weight distribution. With real-time feedback and video monitoring, your rehabilitation team can promptly and accurately identify issues and pain points or monitor your progress throughout your knee pain rehabilitation journey.

One of the key benefits of this cutting-edge equipment is that it replicates natural walking and movement patterns without the artificial feel that hydrotherapy or harnesses create. This makes it an excellent choice for faster recovery after knee injuries or surgeries, as it allows for early mobilization while also preserving strength. Furthermore, it is ideal for sports recovery as athletes can use it for physical conditioning maintenance.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ
Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

Low-Level Laser Therapy

Our advanced treatment modalities for knee pain include laser therapy, which harnesses the revolutionary power of light through photobiomodulation (PBM). LiteCureâ„¢ low-level laser therapy is available for acute and chronic types of knee pain and can be hugely beneficial when coupled with physical therapy, occupational therapy, chiropractic care, and sports recovery care.

Understanding Photobiomodulation (PBM)

PBM is a medical treatment that harnesses the power of light to stimulate the body's natural healing abilities. The photons from the light penetrate deep into the tissue and interact with mitochondria, which results in a boost in energy production. This interaction sets off a biological chain reaction that increases cellular metabolism. Utilizing low-level light therapy has been shown to:

  • Alleviate knee pain
  • Speed up tissue healing
  • Promote overall health and wellness
  • Expedite knee pain injury recovery
Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

Exclusive Access to

Pain Management Professionals

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we know that every patient requires a personalized approach to chronic knee pain and condition management. Sometimes, our patients need access to pain management professionals, who can offer relief in conjunction with physical therapy and other solutions like low-level laser therapy.

Two of the most common services we offer for pain management includes acupuncture which can assist in avoiding knee replacement surgery.

Acupuncture is a common treatment for knee pain that involves inserting thin needles into specific points in your knee. This ancient Chinese medicine has gained popularity in Western culture due to its effectiveness in treating various conditions with minimal side effects.

Acupuncture works by stimulating the nervous system to release various biochemicals, including endorphins and other neurotransmitters. The release of these chemicals helps to reduce inflammation, decrease pain perception, and improve overall blood circulation.

Multiple studies have shown that acupuncture can be effective in treating knee pain caused by a variety of conditions, including osteoarthritis and injuries related to physical activity like running. Acupuncture can also help reduce inflammation, improve muscle function, and decrease pain perception, making it a viable treatment on its own or as an addition to traditional treatment methods like physical therapy.

When undergoing acupuncture, a professional acupuncturist will insert thin needles into specific acupoints on the skin. These needles are left in place for roughly 20 to 30 minutes and may be gently stimulated for an enhanced effect. Patients might experience a slight tingle or warmth at the needle insertion site, but overall, acupuncture is considered a painless procedure.

Acupuncture has been a trusted and effective treatment option for thousands of years. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes acupuncture as a legitimate form of healthcare, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has even funded research studies to explore its efficacy for a range of medical conditions. To learn more about acupuncture for knee pain, contact NJSSW today.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a common treatment for knee pain that involves inserting thin needles into specific points in your knee. This ancient Chinese medicine has gained popularity in Western culture due to its effectiveness in treating various conditions with minimal side effects.

Acupuncture works by stimulating the nervous system to release various biochemicals, including endorphins and other neurotransmitters. The release of these chemicals helps to reduce inflammation, decrease pain perception, and improve overall blood circulation.

Multiple studies have shown that acupuncture can be effective in treating knee pain caused by a variety of conditions, including osteoarthritis and injuries related to physical activity like running. Acupuncture can also help reduce inflammation, improve muscle function, and decrease pain perception, making it a viable treatment on its own or as an addition to traditional treatment methods like physical therapy.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

What Happens During Acupuncture Therapy for Knee Pain?

When undergoing acupuncture, a professional acupuncturist will insert thin needles into specific acupoints on the skin. These needles are left in place for roughly 20 to 30 minutes and may be gently stimulated for an enhanced effect. Patients might experience a slight tingle or warmth at the needle insertion site, but overall, acupuncture is considered a painless procedure.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

Is Acupuncture Actually Effective for Knee Pain?

Acupuncture has been a trusted and effective treatment option for thousands of years. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes acupuncture as a legitimate form of healthcare, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has even funded research studies to explore its efficacy for a range of medical conditions. To learn more about acupuncture for knee pain, contact NJSSW today.

Avoid Knee Replacements with Advanced Knee Pain Treatment in West Carteret, NJ

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment West Carteret, NJ

When it comes to knee pain therapies and treatments, getting a knee replacement should be last on your list. Why put your body through such trauma if you haven't tried other non-invasive treatment options? Whether you're an athlete trying to work through a knee injury or you're over 65 and are dealing with osteoarthritis, NJ Sports Spine and Wellness can help.

It all starts with an introductory consultation at our office in Matawan or Marlboro. During your first visit, we'll talk to you about your knee pain symptoms, the goals you have in mind, and the advanced knee pain treatments available to you at our practice. From there, it's only a matter of time before you get back to a healthy, active lifestyle.

Every day you wait can worsen your knee condition. Contact us today and let our team help get you on the road to recovery and life with painful knees.

Latest News in West Carteret, NJ

West Carteret celebrates return to normalcy during graduation

MOREHEAD CITY — A return to normalcy was the theme Friday as the community honored 222 seniors for the West Carteret Class of 2022 commencement exercises.In her opening remarks, Student Body President Dylan Day pointed to the fact that this class had just completed its first full school year since the eighth grade. Hurricane Florence interrupted its freshman year and COVID-19 cut short its sophomore and junior years, but this final school year was a full one, complete with the high school perks every student is ...

MOREHEAD CITY — A return to normalcy was the theme Friday as the community honored 222 seniors for the West Carteret Class of 2022 commencement exercises.

In her opening remarks, Student Body President Dylan Day pointed to the fact that this class had just completed its first full school year since the eighth grade. Hurricane Florence interrupted its freshman year and COVID-19 cut short its sophomore and junior years, but this final school year was a full one, complete with the high school perks every student is promised.

“We had football season, homecoming court, a formal dance, basketball season, prom and powder puff,” Ms. Day said. “We had field trips, awards ceremonies and senior nights. Now, finally, we get to have our graduation.”

Senior Madison Reavis called her class “resilient, flexible and bold” in her retrospective address. She recalled when she and her classmates first came into the school as freshmen.

“We were trying to navigate the new world of high school: a large school, lots of people and a lot of nervousness,” she said. “Does anybody remember the tale of the pool on the third story?”

Ms. Reavis lauded her classmates for their achievement while recognizing the “sense of uncertainty” that comes with growing older and reaching a milestone.

“I always thought that as a senior, I would have my life all planned out,” she said. “At age 6x, my main aspiration was to be a mermaid. At age 10, I wanted to be a marine biologist. At 14, I hoped to graduate college as a journalism major and spend the rest of my life traveling and writing about enchanting stories. Now that has completely changed. I’m not quite sure what I want to do next…and that is OK.”

West’s 2021-2022 Teacher of the Year Michael Litaker agreed, explaining that having the tools to try different things was more important than knowing what the future holds in his faculty address.

The construction trades teacher joked that most of the students in the ceremony had never seen him before or taken his class, but that he’d still seen the student body “enhance the school environment” from his shop door.

“You may not have seen me,” Mr. Litaker said, “but I saw you. I heard the band playing, the bright flags of the color guard and the athletic teams perfecting their skills. It didn’t stop after the school bell, either, as different clubs and teams and organizations added to the culture.”

He explained the skills students learned in those extracurricular environments were valuable additions to the set of tools they had acquired during their academic journey. Basics like reading, writing and arithmetic built the foundation of that toolkit, while more specialized tools had been added in recent years.

Mr. Litaker compared the use of these tools – such as integrity, self-motivation, teamwork and leadership – to a chisel, that only works when it’s sharpened. When it gets dull, it’s imperative it be restored and “get back to chiseling.”

“You may get hit by life’s circumstances,” Mr. Litaker said, “but never put aside your goals or throw away your opportunities or give up on your dreams. Grind out the mix, smooth out the surfaces and continue to carve out your future.”

Senior Stella Higgs looked ahead at the future in her prospective address, observing how some students will go straight to work, some will enlist in the military, some will attend trade schools and others to universities.

She celebrated the list of “last” high school moments her class experienced, such as bringing the Mullet Bucket home, sneaking baby powder into the football stadium, celebrating blackout night, attending pep rallies, getting “eaten alive” by bugs on the sports fields and decking out in red, white and blue.

Those last moments helped carve out a full senior experience as a Patriot. Now with an uncertain future on the horizon, Higgs implored her classmates to reflect on their resilience and the pride they feel for their school.

“You may have goals set for your future, but those goals may change,” Ms. Higgs said. “Or you may have no idea what you want to do with your life. It’s OK. We aren’t required to have it all figured out yet. The important thing is to keep this sense of pride in all that you do, and you’re bound to succeed.”

Ms. Reavis was confident in her speech that the next step for her classmates would be a positive one, where the “fruits of their labor will be evident.”

“The world will be gaining some of the strongest and kindest people that I know who are sure to make a difference in the world,” she said. “This is simply the beginning of our journey. I cannot wait to see all that we accomplish as we move forward.”

Class President Al Morris presented the senior gift to the school which was a flagpole to be placed next to the football field.

“Just like the class of 2022, this new flagpole is resilient, strong and meant to endure all the challenges that life can throw at it,” Mr. Morris said.

Mr. Poletti agreed that the class had shown its resilience over the “four-year rollercoaster ride” in his commendatory. Earlier in the ceremony, he recognized top achiever, including 34 seniors who received the President’s Award for Educational Excellence. An additional 46 were honored as N.C. Academic Scholars, and 21 were recognized for Character and Academic Achievement Awards.

The West Carteret Singers followed Ms. Day’s opening remarks with the song, “Friends.” The band also performed “The Star-Spangled Banner” and “Pomp and Circumstance.”

Junior honors students who served as marshals during the ceremony were Laney Atkinson, Margaret Davis and Ashleigh Rappaport.

Contact reporter Zack Nall by email at zack@thenewstimes.com.

Freeman looks to shed new but familiar light as Carteret’s head football coach

Twenty six summers ago, Kevin Freeman almost quit the Carteret football team.Two-plus decades later, the former star at both Carteret and West Virginia University finds himself pretty much on the opposite spectrum of giving up as it’s related to Rambler football and the recent struggles they have encountered.“These kids are having a tough time. They need opportunity. This is a tough time right now; a lot of social and emotional problems going on. I want to be their light, help give these kids some faith and some hop...

Twenty six summers ago, Kevin Freeman almost quit the Carteret football team.

Two-plus decades later, the former star at both Carteret and West Virginia University finds himself pretty much on the opposite spectrum of giving up as it’s related to Rambler football and the recent struggles they have encountered.

“These kids are having a tough time. They need opportunity. This is a tough time right now; a lot of social and emotional problems going on. I want to be their light, help give these kids some faith and some hope,” Freeman said.

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Freeman was administratively appointed as Carteret’s new football coach on Monday, and is expected to be approved at the April 28 Board of Education meeting.

The 40—year-old, a special education teacher in Elizabeth, served as an offensive line and linebacker coach under Matt Yascko in 2019 and had previously been an assistant at both Elizabeth and Lakewood. This will be Freeman’s first head coaching assignment.

He will take over for Yascko, whose resignation last July after 14 seasons and two state sectional titles coincided with the district’s decision to cancel all fall sports in 2020 on account of the coronavirus. Winter sports also were canceled.

“We haven’t had anything here for two full seasons. We’re talking about an athletic rebuild basically,” Freeman said. Carteret was 2-8 in 2019 and has turned in losing records in three of its last five seasons. Yet the Ramblers are also just seven years removed from their last sectional final appearance and nine away from their 2012 Central Jersey, Group 2 championship.

“We need to get athletes out and kids participating and to let them know we’re there, we’re gonna have the sport,” said Freeman, a two-way lineman who helped Carteret win its second of four sectional crowns as a junior in 1996. There are many tips for success to be shared here.

“I want to be that light and hope, for them to understand that I’m going to be in this community,” he said. “It’s my community. I was there for 38 years, my parents are still there, all the connections are there.”

Connections that Freeman was once prepared to sever before he even had the chance to make them.

He was playing under former head coach Jeff Weiner in that summer of 1995, and Freeman wasn’t acclimating himself too well to the coach’s disciplinarian style.

“He coached us hard. We knew he cared about us, but, man, we were scared of him. He put that fear in you. I wanted to quit,” said Freeman, who also played basketball and baseball at Carteret.

“He sent a coach who knew my father over to our house, and they pulled me out of bed,” Freeman said. “That was my best practice that day to say the least. He (Weiner) lit a fire under me, and I’ve had that passion ever since.”

Weiner was a firm believer in the importance of weight training, and Freeman needed little convincing as to its value even back in high school. In fact, he credits that – as well as the versatility he developed by playing three sports – as one of the main ingredients behind his gaining a Division 1 scholarship and becoming a three-year defensive starter at West Virginia.

“I’m looking forward to coming back into the community and saying, ‘Listen, I’m from here. I’m nothing special. I put in the hard work. I’m passionate about the game, and in the classroom I got it done. The opportunities were there for me because those things fell into place. If you do these things, maybe you’ll have an opportunity to play some football,’ " Freeman said.

Freeman is encouraged by both the participation numbers and the outlook of the current juniors, who will be his seniors when Carteret returns to the field late next summer. There were 22 sophomores in the program in 2019, and Freeman already has received firm commitments from 13 before he’s even been formally introduced as head coach on Wednesday.

It will be Carteret’s first experience as a member of the Big Central Football Conference, launched last fall as a merger of the Greater Middlesex and Mid-State 38 conferences. Carteret faces a rigorous 2021 schedule that includes powerhouses Hillside, Somerville, Rahway and Summit.

“These kids are the post-pandemic pioneers, and I’ve already stated that. They are in unchartered territory,” Freeman said. “They don’t know how valuable and how important they are to the community and to holding this program together.

“And there’s no better group I’d rather have to do this,” he said. “After coaching 13 years, knowing these kids and the work ethic they showed as sophomores, I’d rather have no group to be going to war with on Friday nights.”

Which begs this one question as Freeman prepares to take on his new role.

Who is really the light here?

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Mike Kinney may be reached at mkinney@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on twitter @MikeKinneyHS

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New housing for veterans and seniors coming to Carteret

CARTERET - A small residential apartment building for veterans and seniors aged 55 and older will be constructed at the former site of the Catholic War Veterans (CWV) building, Mayor Daniel J. Reiman said in a release Tuesday.“Unfortunately the financial burden for our Carteret CWV organization was too large to support keeping the building and property, so we determined the best use would be to redevelop the property for veteran and senior housing,” veteran and CWV President Vinnie Bellino said “All pr...

CARTERET - A small residential apartment building for veterans and seniors aged 55 and older will be constructed at the former site of the Catholic War Veterans (CWV) building, Mayor Daniel J. Reiman said in a release Tuesday.

“Unfortunately the financial burden for our Carteret CWV organization was too large to support keeping the building and property, so we determined the best use would be to redevelop the property for veteran and senior housing,” veteran and CWV President Vinnie Bellino said “All proceeds from the sale of the building were donated to local veterans organizations and a portion will be utilized for a scholarship drive next year.”

The building, located on a cul-de-sac at the end of Carteret Avenue ear Jackson Avenue, will consist of 35 one-bedroom units, the borough said. It will replace an existing hall and single family home currently located on the property. Additional amenities for residents of the building will include a bocce ball court, fire pit, BBQ area and gazebo.

The project was approved by the Carteret Zoning Board at its Jan. 21 meeting. The building will be constructed by Butter Construction. Construction of the building is expected to begin this fall, according to the release.

“Our honorable veterans have given so much for our country, and it seems appropriate, to say the least, that we give what we can in return,” Zoning Board Chairman Frank James said.

“Carteret values and cherishes our veterans and senior population,” Reiman said. “This new development will ensure that Carteret’s seniors and veterans will have an affordable place to live and thrive in our community.”

READ:General manager named for Carteret Performing Arts and Events Center

According to the National Housing Conference, nearly 2.5 million older veteran households—or 24 percent of all households headed by veterans age 55 or older—are housing cost burdened, meaning they spend 30 percent or more of their income on housing, the release said. Of all 50 U.S. states, New Jersey contains the highest share of cost burdened older veteran households at 35.2 percent, according to the release.

READ:Dunkin' in West Carteret getting a drive-thru

“Many veterans live with lingering effects of post-traumatic stress disorder and substance abuse which, combined with a lack of family and social support networks, is why you see so many homeless vets,’’ veteran and former national VFW Commander George Lisicki said. “I’m proud to see our Carteret community stepping up to offer this development for veterans to call home.”

"It has been a priority of this administration to ease some of the pressure experienced by residents vulnerable to the rising cost of living in urban New Jersey, and to ensure that our returning heroes, our veterans, who may be making a transition from service, are not left without practical housing options," Reiman said.

Email: sloyer@gannettnj.com

Susan Loyer covers Middlesex County and more for MyCentralJersey.com. To get unlimited access to her work, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Carteret Residents May Share $42M from Contamination Settlement

CARTERET, NJ — Homeowners who live near a long-gone copper smelting plant along the Arthur Kill may be eligible for $17,500 payouts from a class action settlement over soil and water contamination it left behind.The payment would be shares of a $42 million settlement with the old United States Metal Refining Company (USMR) to resolve a class action lawsuit. The residents’ 2017 lawsuit alleges that USMR did not completely test or clean up contamination after its copper smelting plant closed in 1986.Information about ...

CARTERET, NJ — Homeowners who live near a long-gone copper smelting plant along the Arthur Kill may be eligible for $17,500 payouts from a class action settlement over soil and water contamination it left behind.

The payment would be shares of a $42 million settlement with the old United States Metal Refining Company (USMR) to resolve a class action lawsuit. The residents’ 2017 lawsuit alleges that USMR did not completely test or clean up contamination after its copper smelting plant closed in 1986.

Information about the $42 million deal came to light in documents recently made public online.

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Eligible to share the payments are a few hundred Carteret households who lived near the former USMR smelter between Jan. 30, 2017, and March 27, 2023.

The settlement area is bordered by Peter J. Sica Industrial Highway to the east, Romanowski Street to the northeast, Cypress Street to the north, Arthur and East Grant streets to the west and Middlesex Avenue to the south. Nonresidential properties are not eligible.

“I’m pleased USMR has reached a significant settlement with Carteret’s residential owners whose properties may have been impacted by U.S. Metals,” said Mayor Daniel J. Reiman, who supported his residents’ class action case in 2017.

Residents can learn online how to file a claim.

USMR, a subsidiary of Freeport McMoRan since 2007, denies any wrongdoing despite allegations that it released lead, arsenic and other contaminants into the environment.

The company operated an industrial smelter and other metal refining operations on the Arthur Kill in Carteret from 1903 to 1986.

In 1988, USMR signed consent order with the N.J. Department of Environmental Protection to clean up the site, but borough officials and residents say the company never sufficiently complied.

The borough took legal action against the company in 2012 over its unfinished remediation. And, in 2017, Carteret received a $7.4 million settlement which the borough applied to environmental, public health and waterfront recreation initiatives.

Also in February 2017, neighborhood homeowners banded together to file their class action lawsuit against USMR, alleging that 80 years of extracting copper polluted their nearby properties, exposed residents to unsafe levels of lead and arsenic, and harmed their property values.

The $42 million settlement now on the table is meant to resolve those class action claims.

20 Middlesex County Students Named 2024 STEM Scholars

Photo Credit: NJ STEM SCHOLARS PROGRAMPublishedNovember 4, 2023 at 9:49 AMMIDDLESEX COUNTY, NJ — Twenty high school and college students from Middlesex County communities have been selected as Governor’s STEM Scholars, chosen from nearly a thousand New Jersey student-applicants to participate for the coveted program.The STEM Scholar (GSS) program is a public-private collaboration between Gov. Phil ...

Photo Credit: NJ STEM SCHOLARS PROGRAM

PublishedNovember 4, 2023 at 9:49 AM

MIDDLESEX COUNTY, NJ — Twenty high school and college students from Middlesex County communities have been selected as Governor’s STEM Scholars, chosen from nearly a thousand New Jersey student-applicants to participate for the coveted program.

The STEM Scholar (GSS) program is a public-private collaboration between Gov. Phil Murphy’s office, the N.J. Research & Development Council; the state Department of Education and the state Secretary of Higher Education; and several public–private research institutions.

Chosen as 2024 STEM scholars from Middlesex County are:

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● Nishi Agrawal, a junior at Edison Academy Magnet School

● Sarvesh Anand, sophomore at Monroe High School's Biomedical STEM Academy

● Kare Bangar, a Middlesex College physics/engineering student.

● Animesh Borad, a biology major at Rutgers University-Camden.

● Pooja Challi, a junior at West Windsor Plainsboro High School South

● Lawrence He, a Princeton High School senior from South Brunswick

● Shelby Hilarczyk, a junior at Edison Academy Magnet School.

● Shreyaah Iyer, senior at John P. Stevens High School in Edison.

● Sonal Lakhani, senior at John P. Stevens High School in Edison.

● Aidan Ogborn, a junior at Metuchen High School

● Chelsea Panton, a senior at Piscataway High School

● Misha Patel, a senior at Edison Academy Magnet School

● Anika Pruthi, medical student at Rowan Unviersity-Cooper Medical School

● Reeti Rout, sophomore at John P. Stevens High School in Edison

● Zashaan Shaik, a junior at Edison High School STEM Academy

● Ved Shenoy, a junior at West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South

● Pranav Tripathi, a Rutgers University senior

● Akhil Vemuri, senior at John P. Stevens High School in Edison

● Amber Verma, junior at West Windsor Plainsboro High School North

● Yash Verma, sophomore at John P. Stevens High School in Edison

To qualify as STEM scholars, applicants must maintain a 3.5 grade point average (GPA) or better; be New Jersey high school sophomores to college doctorate candidates; and must demonstrate proficient STEM skills.

The new candidates will graduate from the program in May 2024.

The governor’s STEM Scholars program was created to strengthen New Jersey’s talent pool of future science, technology, engineering and mathematics professionals.

The program prepares and introduces gifted STEM students to New Jersey’s growing number of research and development businesses, and to help today’s students land future jobs in academia, industries and government.

“New Jersey’s long-tradition of innovation – from the invention of the light bulb to development of the first transistor – powered by some of the best scientists, engineers and inventors in the world,” said Anthony Cicatiello, president of the New Jersey Research & Development Council.

“Through the Governor’s STEM Scholars, we are able to support the next generation of innovators right here in the Garden State, ensuring a continued legacy of invention and discovery that will drive our economy into the future,” Cicatiello said.

The scholar program lets students explore professional opportunities that can help jump-start their future careers, sending them to conferences, on field trips, and enabling them to participate in research projects.

For the 2023-2024 program year, conferences will be held at Kean University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Princeton University, and Rutgers University; and field trips will take them to Bristol Myers Squibb, Kenvue, Panasonic, PSEG, Stryker, and United Airlines.

Read more at the 2023-2024 Governor’s STEM Scholars website.

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