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Advanced Knee Pain Treatment in Sayreville, NJ

Are you experiencing knee pain symptoms such as popping, clicking, bone-on-bone grinding, achiness, or sharp stabs? You're not alone in this journey. Knee pain affects nearly 25% of adults in the United States, causing discomfort, swelling, and chronic pain that can hinder everyday activities like childcare, walking, and exercise. Shockingly, recent statistics from The American Academy of Family Physicians indicate a 65% increase in diagnosed knee pain cases.

In a world where invasive surgeries and prescription painkillers are often the default solutions, it's crucial to explore the effective non-invasive options that are available. These alternative treatments provide relief without the associated risks of surgery.

Today, many doctors still recommend invasive surgeries and prescription painkillers rather than exploring non-invasive options. While those treatments are needed in some circumstances, there are alternative treatments available that can help you overcome knee pain without needing to go under the knife.

NJ Sports Spine and Wellness' advanced knee pain treatment in Sayreville, NJ gives men and women suffering from knee pain hope. Instead of relying on surgery, our team of doctors and physical therapists use non-invasive, highly effective treatments to help heal prevalent conditions such as:

Service Areas

Arthritis

Soft tissue injury

ACL tears

MCL tears

Patella dislocation

Misalignment of the kneecap

Patella tendonitis

Jumper's knee

Osgood Schlatter's Disease

Knee

With the right treatment,

many people can reduce their pain and improve their function, allowing them to return to normal daily activities. Plus, by taking preventative measures and seeking prompt care from our team, it's possible to reduce your risk of developing chronic knee pain and other painful knee conditions. If you've been searching for a non-invasive way to eliminate knee pain and get back to an active life, your journey to recovery starts here.

Let's take a closer look at some of the knee pain treatments available at NJ Sports Spine and Wellness, which all serve as great alternatives to knee replacement surgery.

Physical Therapy:

Optimizing Musculoskeletal Health with Conservative Care

The field of Physical Therapy (PT) aims to rehabilitate individuals who have experienced injury, illness, or disability by restoring their mobility and function. Physical therapists cater to patients of various ages and capabilities, ranging from young athletes to senior citizens, in order to help them surpass physical limitations and improve their standard of living with advanced knee pain treatment in Sayreville, NJ.

At NJ Sports Spine and Wellness, our physical therapy program was founded on a patient-centric philosophy, where physical therapists work closely with patients to get a deep understanding of their goals, preferences, and capabilities. In doing so, they can create a tailor-made treatment strategy to address their unique knee pain with the goal of avoiding a knee replacement. Treatment may involve exercises that are therapeutic in nature and can include:

  • Joint mobilizations
  • Soft tissue mobilization using cupping
  • Graston technique
  • Soft tissue massage
  • Stretching of associated muscle groups

Joint Mobilization for Knee Pain

This unique knee pain solution involves physical therapists using skilled manual therapy techniques to help improve your joint range of motion while simultaneously reducing your knee pain.

During joint mobilization, a physical therapist applies targeted pressures or forces to a joint in specific directions to improve its mobility. The intensity of the force applied can vary, and it is adjusted based on the patient's comfort level. Joint mobilization is generally pain-free.

STM

Soft Tissue Mobilization (STM)

Soft Tissue Mobilization is a manual therapy technique that involves stretching and applying deep pressure to rigid muscle tissue. This helps to relax muscle tension and move fluids that are trapped in the tissues that cause pain and inflammation. This effective form of physical therapy is often used as an advanced knee pain treatment in Sayreville, NJ for treating knee strains, knee sprains, knee pain, and more.

Graston

The Graston Technique

The Graston Technique involves the use of handheld instruments to identify and break up scar tissue through specialized massage. During a Graston Technique session, physical therapists use convex and concave tools for cross-friction massage, which involves rubbing or brushing against the grain of the scar tissue. This process re-introduces small amounts of trauma to the affected area. In some cases, this process temporarily causes inflammation, which can actually boost the amount and rate of blood flow in the knee. This process helps initiate and promote the healing process so you can get back to a normal life.

Massage

Soft Tissue Massage

Soft tissue massage is a less intense form of massage than it's deep-tissue relative. Instead of focusing on slow and firm strokes to reach the deep layers of muscles and tissues, this massage technique uses a variety of pressures, depths, and durations. Soft tissue massage is helpful in alleviating different types of knee aches, pains, and injuries. Soft tissue massages can also help reduce stress, improve circulation, and promote relaxation.

Advanced Mechanics and Technology:

The Future of Knee Pain Therapy

While knee pain is a common symptom that affects millions of Americans every year, no two cases of knee pain are ever exactly alike. Some types of knee injuries require non-traditional solutions. At New Jersey Sports Spine and Wellness, we offer a range of treatments that leverage mechanics and technology to help patients recover from injuries while treating inflammation and pain as well as resolve the root cause of the pain.

AlterAlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill is equipped with NASA Differential Air Pressure (DAP) technology, which is a precise air calibration system that uses the user's actual body weight to enhance rehabilitation and training. By utilizing a pressurized air chamber, the AlterG allows patients and athletes to move without any pain or restrictions.

This advanced knee pain treatment in Sayreville, NJ uniformly reduces gravitational load and body weight up to 80% in precise 1% increments. The results can be incredible, with patients reporting benefits such as:

  • Restoring and building of knee strength
  • Restored range of motion in the knee
  • Better balance
  • Improved knee function
  • More

What Makes the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill So Effective?

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill can monitor various metrics such as speed, gait pattern, stride length, and weight distribution. With real-time feedback and video monitoring, your rehabilitation team can promptly and accurately identify issues and pain points or monitor your progress throughout your knee pain rehabilitation journey.

One of the key benefits of this cutting-edge equipment is that it replicates natural walking and movement patterns without the artificial feel that hydrotherapy or harnesses create. This makes it an excellent choice for faster recovery after knee injuries or surgeries, as it allows for early mobilization while also preserving strength. Furthermore, it is ideal for sports recovery as athletes can use it for physical conditioning maintenance.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Sayreville, NJ
Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Sayreville, NJ

Low-Level Laser Therapy

Our advanced treatment modalities for knee pain include laser therapy, which harnesses the revolutionary power of light through photobiomodulation (PBM). LiteCureâ„¢ low-level laser therapy is available for acute and chronic types of knee pain and can be hugely beneficial when coupled with physical therapy, occupational therapy, chiropractic care, and sports recovery care.

Understanding Photobiomodulation (PBM)

PBM is a medical treatment that harnesses the power of light to stimulate the body's natural healing abilities. The photons from the light penetrate deep into the tissue and interact with mitochondria, which results in a boost in energy production. This interaction sets off a biological chain reaction that increases cellular metabolism. Utilizing low-level light therapy has been shown to:

  • Alleviate knee pain
  • Speed up tissue healing
  • Promote overall health and wellness
  • Expedite knee pain injury recovery
Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Sayreville, NJ

Exclusive Access to

Pain Management Professionals

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we know that every patient requires a personalized approach to chronic knee pain and condition management. Sometimes, our patients need access to pain management professionals, who can offer relief in conjunction with physical therapy and other solutions like low-level laser therapy.

Two of the most common services we offer for pain management includes acupuncture which can assist in avoiding knee replacement surgery.

Acupuncture is a common treatment for knee pain that involves inserting thin needles into specific points in your knee. This ancient Chinese medicine has gained popularity in Western culture due to its effectiveness in treating various conditions with minimal side effects.

Acupuncture works by stimulating the nervous system to release various biochemicals, including endorphins and other neurotransmitters. The release of these chemicals helps to reduce inflammation, decrease pain perception, and improve overall blood circulation.

Multiple studies have shown that acupuncture can be effective in treating knee pain caused by a variety of conditions, including osteoarthritis and injuries related to physical activity like running. Acupuncture can also help reduce inflammation, improve muscle function, and decrease pain perception, making it a viable treatment on its own or as an addition to traditional treatment methods like physical therapy.

When undergoing acupuncture, a professional acupuncturist will insert thin needles into specific acupoints on the skin. These needles are left in place for roughly 20 to 30 minutes and may be gently stimulated for an enhanced effect. Patients might experience a slight tingle or warmth at the needle insertion site, but overall, acupuncture is considered a painless procedure.

Acupuncture has been a trusted and effective treatment option for thousands of years. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes acupuncture as a legitimate form of healthcare, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has even funded research studies to explore its efficacy for a range of medical conditions. To learn more about acupuncture for knee pain, contact NJSSW today.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Sayreville, NJ

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a common treatment for knee pain that involves inserting thin needles into specific points in your knee. This ancient Chinese medicine has gained popularity in Western culture due to its effectiveness in treating various conditions with minimal side effects.

Acupuncture works by stimulating the nervous system to release various biochemicals, including endorphins and other neurotransmitters. The release of these chemicals helps to reduce inflammation, decrease pain perception, and improve overall blood circulation.

Multiple studies have shown that acupuncture can be effective in treating knee pain caused by a variety of conditions, including osteoarthritis and injuries related to physical activity like running. Acupuncture can also help reduce inflammation, improve muscle function, and decrease pain perception, making it a viable treatment on its own or as an addition to traditional treatment methods like physical therapy.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Sayreville, NJ

What Happens During Acupuncture Therapy for Knee Pain?

When undergoing acupuncture, a professional acupuncturist will insert thin needles into specific acupoints on the skin. These needles are left in place for roughly 20 to 30 minutes and may be gently stimulated for an enhanced effect. Patients might experience a slight tingle or warmth at the needle insertion site, but overall, acupuncture is considered a painless procedure.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Sayreville, NJ

Is Acupuncture Actually Effective for Knee Pain?

Acupuncture has been a trusted and effective treatment option for thousands of years. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes acupuncture as a legitimate form of healthcare, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has even funded research studies to explore its efficacy for a range of medical conditions. To learn more about acupuncture for knee pain, contact NJSSW today.

Avoid Knee Replacements with Advanced Knee Pain Treatment in Sayreville, NJ

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Sayreville, NJ

When it comes to knee pain therapies and treatments, getting a knee replacement should be last on your list. Why put your body through such trauma if you haven't tried other non-invasive treatment options? Whether you're an athlete trying to work through a knee injury or you're over 65 and are dealing with osteoarthritis, NJ Sports Spine and Wellness can help.

It all starts with an introductory consultation at our office in Matawan or Marlboro. During your first visit, we'll talk to you about your knee pain symptoms, the goals you have in mind, and the advanced knee pain treatments available to you at our practice. From there, it's only a matter of time before you get back to a healthy, active lifestyle.

Every day you wait can worsen your knee condition. Contact us today and let our team help get you on the road to recovery and life with painful knees.

Latest News in Sayreville, NJ

Sayreville school taxes up 5%. Here's why

SAYREVILLE - The borough school board has approved a 2023–24 budget which calls for a 5.23% tax increase.Of the $116,543,486 school budget, $70,527,273 will come from local property owners.On the average house assessed at $145,694, the tax levy will bill $470.43. The budget was approved at the May 2 Board of Education meeting. According to the Middlesex County Tax Board, property in Sayreville is assessed at only 42% of its market value.The 5.23% tax rise for 2022-23 is comprised of a 2% increase in ...

SAYREVILLE - The borough school board has approved a 2023–24 budget which calls for a 5.23% tax increase.

Of the $116,543,486 school budget, $70,527,273 will come from local property owners.

On the average house assessed at $145,694, the tax levy will bill $470.43. The budget was approved at the May 2 Board of Education meeting. According to the Middlesex County Tax Board, property in Sayreville is assessed at only 42% of its market value.

The 5.23% tax rise for 2022-23 is comprised of a 2% increase in the regular tax levy, 0.32% increase due to higher enrollment and a 2.91% increase due mainly to higher health insurance costs.

There are always challenges in developing a budget, said Superintendent of Schools Richard Labbe, listing items such as facilities, increased enrollment, personnel needs for existing and improved academic and extracurricular programs as well as upgrades for technology and security.

The school tax hike would be $187.72 on a $145,694 assessed borough home. An additional $282.71 comes into play because of the district's debt service which increased to $2,421,687.

According to the district, the debt service increase is due to the recent $97.4 million bond referendum approved by voters in October. It was anticipated to increase the average assessed home by $315 but came in lower because of competitive interest rates.

More:'Desperately needed': Sayreville planning $97 million in school improvements

Pre-K through grade 12 enrollment for Sayreville stood at 6,230 in the 2021-22 school year with a jump to 6,357 in the 2022-23 school year. Projections show a rise to 6,423 students in the nine township schools in the 2023-24 school year.

Last year, employee benefits came in at $19,687,034. The budget reflects a 8.98% increase for next year for a total of $21,455,442. This includes a 15% budgeted increase in liability/property and worker’s compensation insurance, a 20% budgeted increase in medical benefits and a 7% budgeted increase in prescription benefits.

The district did receive a 15.95% state aid increase with an additional 1.90% fund balance increase over the 2021-22 allotment. This added $42,689,854 back into the budget. The state aid comprises 36% of the total school budget with the annual tax levy making up the bulk of the funding at 60%.

"We were thrilled to learn that we received $5.7 million more in equalization aid (from the state), and therefore we were able to restore many of the items that we cut, however, truth be told we did cut about $18 million from that original budget that was submitted back in November," Labbe said.

Other state grants add another $12,994,096 to the budget for the 2023-24 school year.

District officials said budget calls for increases in facilities, infrastructure and transportation, technology, security and student achievement and Social Emotional Learning (SEL). Labbe said the benefits from the 2023-24 budget are "great."

Additions to staff include four new teachers, a high school school counselor and a nurse as well as stipends for three new club advisors. There also will be new certified and non-certified staff members including a Supervisor of Special Education: Transition, four full-time campus monitors, seven bus drivers, two bus aides and a custodian.

Among other new item are history and social studies textbooks and licenses, an AP Pre-Calculus course at high school and Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality technology and Silas animation-based social and emotional development software.

There will be new and replacement instruments for the middle school and high school bands, athletic equipment, a new volleyball program for boys and girls and a new girls' football club. The new sports programs include two coaches, equipment and supplies for each. The theatre program also will benefit from lighting and sound professional services.

The district also piloted an augmented reality (AR) software and have budgeted for the implementation of the technology throughout the district. Labbe said not only would it enhance instruction in science and mathematics, but in social studies and English language arts as well.

Facility upgrades include replacement of the stadium lights at the high school, a new or repaired audio board in the high school auditorium, fencing at Emma L. Arleth School and Harry S. Truman School, floor replacement in the media center at the Truman School, portable wall partition replacement in the multipurpose room at the Dwight D. Eisenhower School, repaving of the parking lot at the Jesse Selover School and a portion by the building at Arleth, a parking lot expansion at Samsel Upper Elementary School (SUES) for Central Office employees, minor refurbishment of the health clinic at the Sayreville Middle School and the purchase of one replacement truck, one new truck and an all-purpose vehicle for Buildings and Grounds.

"Obviously the ongoing maintenance and refurbishment of our facilities is a challenge however, when it comes to major renovations, that's covered through the referendum," Labbe said. "But, there are still minor refurbishments that we still have to do within our facilities."

The budget also includes new bus routes, the purchase of one replacement minibus, two new minibuses, one of which is a wheelchair accessible, five new big buses and a truck for the transportation department.

The goal under transportation is to get closer to doing 100% of the district's own school bus routes, Labbe said.

"Right now we're about 90%. Replacement of school buses is always something that's a challenge within our budget," he said. "And of course this year, not only are we replacing school buses, we're also adding to our fleet. So with this budget we're gonna get very close to that 100%."

More:Bombers Beyond Café brings Main Street lessons to Sayreville's diverse learners

The budget also allocates funds for additional full-time evening and central command campus security monitors, school building video surveillance camera upgrades, new bus video surveillance cameras, two-way radio system upgrades and additional metal detectors are included in the budget.

"We live in a very challenging world right now," Labbe said. "It seems every month, every week we hear about some type of shooting taking place. It's an ongoing commitment that we have to ensure the protection of our students and our staff. And that's something that we consider when we develop our budget."

There also will be an extension of district-wide mental health clinical services, including remote psychiatric services available for all students.

email: cmakin@gannettnj.com

Cheryl Makin is an award-winning features and education reporter forMyCentralJersey.com, part of the USA Today Network. Contact: Cmakin@gannettnj.com or@CherylMakin. To get unlimited access, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

NJEDA Board Approves Two Million-Square-Foot Multi-Use Sayreville Project for Aspire Award

Riverton project will transform long-dormant brownfield property into bustling riverfront communityTRENTON, N.J. (December 14, 2023) – The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) Board today approved Aspire tax credits for a mixed-used, riverfront development in Sayreville that represents more than two million square feet of newly-constructed residential and commercial space, including 1,300 new residential units, 20 percent of which will be ...

Riverton project will transform long-dormant brownfield property into bustling riverfront community

TRENTON, N.J. (December 14, 2023) – The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) Board today approved Aspire tax credits for a mixed-used, riverfront development in Sayreville that represents more than two million square feet of newly-constructed residential and commercial space, including 1,300 new residential units, 20 percent of which will be designated as affordable. The project is associated with over $1 billion in private investment.

The development, known as Riverton, is considered a transformative project under the Aspire Program and was approved for an award of up to 50 percent of eligible projects costs, not to exceed $400 million in total. Riverton is the first transformative project, and first project overall, that was approved under the new Aspire rules, which the NJEDA adopted in November. To date, the NJEDA Board has approved a total of $694 million in Aspire awards for residential projects, which will create 1,800 housing units and $271 million for a commercial transformative project under the prior rules.

“With today’s approval, Sayreville is poised to undergo a tremendous renaissance, which will bring new housing, jobs, retail, and recreation that will benefit the entire community,” said Governor Phil Murphy. “The Aspire Program continues to drive critical investments that support economic growth in communities across New Jersey.”

“Aspire’s flexible design had enabled us to support this long-anticipated project, which will transform a vast tract of land that had been rendered unusable many years ago, and once rehabilitated, in ways that will reinvigorate Sayreville, create jobs for the local community, and improve quality of life for Riverton tenants and residents of nearby areas,” said NJEDA Chief Executive Officer Tim Sullivan. “This is exactly the sort of thoughtful, impactful investment the legislature and Governor Murphy hoped to attract when creating the Aspire Program.”

Sayreville Seaport Associates Urban Renewal, L.P. is the applicant of the Riverton project, which is advancing at the culmination of a nearly 20-year efforts to remediate the former industrial site. In addition to the residential units which comprise over 1.2 million square feet, the development will include nearly 800,000 square feet of commercial and retail space. It will also generate additional public amenities, to include a public Waterfront Promenade, to which Sayreville residents and the general public will have access. The walkway will feature Heroes Walk (exhibits and installations honoring Sayreville’s veterans), along with lighting, seating areas, gathering spaces, enhanced landscaping, and an open-air amphitheater; on-site spaces for municipal offices, and two designated open-air performing arts venues.

“Today’s Aspire announcement is yet another example of how thoughtful economic development incentives can advance transformative projects that both improve our environment and lift our communities,” said Commissioner of Environmental Protection Shawn M. LaTourette. “This vast former industrial site will soon become a new hub of economic activity and point of community pride that reconnects the residents of Sayreville and Middlesex County with their Raritan River waterfront. My DEP colleagues and I congratulate the NJEDA on this important milestone and applaud Governor Murphy and our Legislature for the vision and leadership that will ensure the revitalize this brownfield site and others across the Garden State.”

Aspire is a place-based economic development program created under the New Jersey Economic Recovery Act of 2020 (ERA) to support mixed-use, transit-oriented development with tax credits to commercial and residential real estate development projects that have financing gaps. All residential Aspire projects containing newly-constructed units must include at least 20 percent affordable housing. As a performance-based program, projects must certify that all commitments established at time of approval have been met before receiving their first disbursement of tax credits.

“This mixed-use development project will be exactly the sort of economic boost the Sayreville Seaport area needs, and will bring economic renewal and vitality to the entire riverfront,” said Senator Joseph F. Vitale. “I can’t stress enough just how important the NJEDA and the Aspire programs have been to residents and how they continue to allow us to rehabilitate viable land areas to pursue solid, sustainable commercial development and housing for the future.”

“I’m so pleased to see this plan come to life for the residents of Sayreville and our entire region,” said Assembly Speaker Craig J. Coughlin. “This has been a model of local and state government working together to benefit the community with environmental remediation and economic development. After decades of this land sitting vacant and unsafe, this strategically-located project will serve as an economic engine for the area, broadening the tax base and providing high-quality, affordable housing for generations to come.”

“It is rewarding to see good governance at work in Sayreville thanks to the ongoing success of the Aspire program,” said Assemblywoman Yvonne Lopez (D-Middlesex). “The project approved for tax credits today will make use of land that has sat vacant for far too long, turning it into the site of new commercial and living spaces that will spur sustainable economic growth for the local economy. I look forward to the day we break ground on this important, transformative project.”

In line with Governor Murphy and the NJEDA’s commitment to fiscal responsibility and transparency, the Aspire program rules include provisions, such as a gap financing review and excess revenue sharing requirements, to ensure tax credits are awarded responsibly.

The Aspire program application, as well as complete rules, eligibility requirements, award sizes, and other information can be found here.

About the NJEDA

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) serves as the State’s principal agency for driving economic growth. The NJEDA is committed to making New Jersey a national model for inclusive and sustainable economic development by focusing on key strategies to help build strong and dynamic communities, create good jobs for New Jersey residents, and provide pathways to a stronger and fairer economy. Through partnerships with a diverse range of stakeholders, the NJEDA creates and implements initiatives to enhance the economic vitality and quality of life in the State and strengthen New Jersey’s long-term economic competitiveness.

To learn more about NJEDA resources for businesses, call NJEDA Customer Care at 844-965-1125 or visit https://www.njeda.gov and follow @NewJerseyEDA on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn.###

Big development planned for Sayreville site after environmental cleanup

For decades, a factory operated by National Lead cranked out paint and pollution on a 400-acre plot of land along the Raritan River in Sayreville, in the shadow of the Driscoll Bridge. The factory is long gone and the land, now vacant, has become a target for potentially lucrative redevelopment.North American Properties, a national developer, now owns the land and plans to build a mixed-use community called Riverton. The plan promises to essentially build a small town along the river from scratch, with 2,000 residential units and reta...

For decades, a factory operated by National Lead cranked out paint and pollution on a 400-acre plot of land along the Raritan River in Sayreville, in the shadow of the Driscoll Bridge. The factory is long gone and the land, now vacant, has become a target for potentially lucrative redevelopment.

North American Properties, a national developer, now owns the land and plans to build a mixed-use community called Riverton. The plan promises to essentially build a small town along the river from scratch, with 2,000 residential units and retail businesses anchored by Bass Pro Shops and other national chains. The Riverton plan has been around for years, and previous development plans for the site came and went before.

That nothing has been built yet is due in part to the complex environmental cleanup first required. Now, state officials say that cleanup is largely done and the land is ready for construction to begin.

At a news conference Monday, officials touted the effort as a prime example of how environmental responsibility is good for business.

“By promoting environmental health, we promote our economic health because the two are so inextricably linked,” said Shawn LaTourette, commissioner of the state Department of Environmental Protection.

But environmentalists say more remediation is needed. NY/NJ Baykeeper sued National Lead, state regulators, local leaders and multiple developers in 2009 to try to force a cleanup of the pollution that remains at the bottom of the Raritan River. That litigation is ongoing.

“Here we are about to have thousands of new residents and customers coming into these stores and into the area. And yet we still have a river that has not even begun to be remediated from the heavy metals and the sulfuric acid and other waste,” Greg Remaud, CEO of the NY/NJ Baykeeper, said.

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DEVELOPMENT MIXED-USE COMMUNITY NATIONAL LEAD NY/NJ BAYKEEPER REDEVELOPMENT REMEDIATION RIVERTON SAYREVILLE SHAWN LATOURETTE

NJ awards up to $400 million tax break in waterfront development off Garden State Parkway

The Riverton development in Sayreville, perhaps the largest redevelopment project on the East Coast, will be receiving no more than a $400 million tax break from the state.The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) on Thursday awarded the tax credits for the $2....

The Riverton development in Sayreville, perhaps the largest redevelopment project on the East Coast, will be receiving no more than a $400 million tax break from the state.

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (NJEDA) on Thursday awarded the tax credits for the $2.5 billion mixed-used development on the banks of the Raritan River by the Garden State Parkway.

The proposed development calls for more than 2 million square feet of new residential and commercial space, including 1,300 new residential units, 20% of which will be designated as affordable.

Riverton is the first project approved under the new rules of the Aspire Program, a gap financing tool to support commercial, mixed-use and residential real estate development projects that replaced the Economic Redevelopment and Growth Grant (ERG).

“With today’s approval, Sayreville is poised to undergo a tremendous renaissance, which will bring new housing, jobs, retail, and recreation that will benefit the entire community,” Gov. Phil Murphy said in a statement.

“Aspire’s flexible design had enabled us to support this long-anticipated project, which will transform a vast tract of land that had been rendered unusable many years ago, and once rehabilitated, in ways that will reinvigorate Sayreville, create jobs for the local community, and improve quality of life for Riverton tenants and residents of nearby areas,” NJEDA CEO Tim Sullivan said in a statement.

Earlier:What’s up with the $2.5B waterfront development off the Garden State Parkway?

“We appreciate the vision of the Murphy administration and the New Jersey Legislature in creating the Aspire program, which will enable us to develop a new mixed-use waterfront community on a site left damaged by industry, delivering quality affordable housing, well-paying jobs for union trade labor, and new tax revenues, along with exciting retail and entertainment destinations and community amenities,” Kevin Polston, the project executive for Riverton, said in a statement. "This truly has been a collaborative process to reclaim the land for long-term public benefit. We are eager to move forward with the first phase of vertical construction in the new year.”

The tax credits will be awarded to Sayreville Seaport Associates Urban Renewal, the developer.

In addition to the 1.2 million square feet of residential space, Riverton will include nearly 800,000 square feet of commercial and retail space.

The public amenities will include a public Waterfront Promenade, to which Sayreville residents and the general public will have access. The walkway will feature Heroes Walk, exhibits and installations honoring Sayreville’s veterans, along with lighting, seating areas, gathering spaces, enhanced landscaping and an open-air amphitheater; on-site spaces for municipal offices and two designated open-air performing arts venues.

Aspire is a place-based economic development program created under the New Jersey Economic Recovery Act of 2020 (ERA) to support mixed-use, transit-oriented development with tax credits to commercial and residential real estate development projects that have financing gaps.

All residential Aspire projects containing newly constructed units must include at least 20% affordable housing.

Earlier:$2.5 billion waterfront development off Garden State Parkway eyed by popular food chains

As a performance-based program, projects must certify that all commitments established at time of approval have been met before receiving their first disbursement of tax credits.

“I’m so pleased to see this plan come to life for the residents of Sayreville and our entire region,” Assembly Speaker Craig J. Coughlin said in a statement. “This has been a model of local and state government working together to benefit the community with environmental remediation and economic development. After decades of this land sitting vacant and unsafe, this strategically-located project will serve as an economic engine for the area, broadening the tax base and providing high-quality, affordable housing for generations to come.”

Email: sloyer@gannettnj.com

Susan Loyer covers Middlesex County and more for MyCentralJersey.com. To get unlimited access to her work, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

Sayreville school district sues borough for scrapping bus parking project

SAYREVILLE – The Board of Education is done playing nice with the borough.The school district has filed a lawsuit against the borough in Superior Court over the proposed district transportation complex, alleging breach of contract.The school district is ...

SAYREVILLE – The Board of Education is done playing nice with the borough.

The school district has filed a lawsuit against the borough in Superior Court over the proposed district transportation complex, alleging breach of contract.

The school district is asking the court to order the borough to meet its obligations under an agreement with the school district, including "exhibiting good faith and fair dealing."

The district is seeking a court declaration that it has "been harmed" by the borough's breach of its promises and that the district is entitled to enforce the terms of the agreement.

The lawsuit is also asking the court to order the borough to reimburse the district for legal costs, increased construction costs caused by the delay and "any other relief the court determines appropriate and necessary."

A court hearing is scheduled for Jan. 18.

"We will have no comment on pending litigation," Borough Administrator Glenn Skarzyanski said Monday.

The lawsuit is the latest twist in the controversy between the school district and the borough over the transportation center.

In March 2022, the school district and borough signed a memorandum of understanding agreement to construct a joint transportation center for school district vehicles and the borough's Department of Public Works.

Local:Sayreville strip club was a multimillion-dollar family-run prostitution ring, AG alleges

After plans for a transportation facility at Selover School were scrapped because of neighborhood opposition, the two sides agreed to a new site, owned by the borough, on the north side of Cheesequake Road between the ballfields and the DuPont factory.

The district and the borough agreed to a long-term land-swap lease, in which the district would obtain a renewable 50-year lease with a 25-year renewal option on the borough’s property in exchange for the borough getting a lease on the portion of the district’s property at the Selover site where was athletic fields are located.

After the agreement was signed, the district moved forward with its plans to construct the transportation complex, "expending significant sums of scarce taxpayer funds to do so," according to the lawsuit.

In the lawsuit, the district claims the borough was "a complicit partner" and participated in the district's planning and construction efforts.

In October, the school board awarded a $5.6 million bid for construction to James R. Ientile, Inc., of Marlboro, with the money from the district’s capital reserve fund.

And then the trouble began.

The district began working with the board to formalize the memorandum of understanding so that the contract could be finalized once the leases were signed.

But around Oct. 24, the borough told the district it had reservations about signing the lease after concerns were raised by residents at a Borough Council meeting.

Those concerns included increased traffic, environmental impacts and the use of the land. Previously, DuPont had operated a chemical manufacturing plant on the property since 1904 but had completed environmental remediation.

The school district said it had all necessary approvals to start construction of the transportation complex.

The district then asked the borough to approve the leases, adding the "refusal to execute the formal lease documents without further explanation would be considered a repudiation and breach of the contract by the borough" as well as "a breach of its implicit duty of good faith and fair dealing."

When the bids expired on Nov. 20 and no leases had been signed, the school board was required to seek new bids.

The lawsuit followed.

In the lawsuit, the district says it "explicitly and directly relied on the representations, offers and inducements made by the Borough at every step of the process."

The district added it would have already built and been using a transportation complex at the Selover site were it not for the borough’s inducement to forego that project in lieu of construction on the Cheesequake Road property.

In 2017, the school district switched from a private contractor for student transportation to in-house service. That switch sparked the need for a transportation center when buses started to take up parking spots at the high school.

The district is responsible to provide transportation for 5,316 students. The district owns and operates 49 full-size buses and 17 minibuses, as well as other vehicles.

email: cmakin@gannettnj.com

Cheryl Makin is an award-winning features and education reporter forMyCentralJersey.com, part of the USA Today Network. Contact: Cmakin@gannettnj.com or@CherylMakin. To get unlimited access, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

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