Lodaer Img

Discover

Knee Pain Treatment & Specialist

In Monmouth Beach, NJ

Avoid Surgery and Reduce Pain with

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment in Monmouth Beach, NJ

Are you experiencing knee pain symptoms such as popping, clicking, bone-on-bone grinding, achiness, or sharp stabs? You're not alone in this journey. Knee pain affects nearly 25% of adults in the United States, causing discomfort, swelling, and chronic pain that can hinder everyday activities like childcare, walking, and exercise. Shockingly, recent statistics from The American Academy of Family Physicians indicate a 65% increase in diagnosed knee pain cases.

In a world where invasive surgeries and prescription painkillers are often the default solutions, it's crucial to explore the effective non-invasive options that are available. These alternative treatments provide relief without the associated risks of surgery.

Today, many doctors still recommend invasive surgeries and prescription painkillers rather than exploring non-invasive options. While those treatments are needed in some circumstances, there are alternative treatments available that can help you overcome knee pain without needing to go under the knife.

NJ Sports Spine and Wellness' advanced knee pain treatment in Monmouth Beach, NJ gives men and women suffering from knee pain hope. Instead of relying on surgery, our team of doctors and physical therapists use non-invasive, highly effective treatments to help heal prevalent conditions such as:

Service Areas

Arthritis

Soft tissue injury

ACL tears

MCL tears

Patella dislocation

Misalignment of the kneecap

Patella tendonitis

Jumper's knee

Osgood Schlatter's Disease

Knee

With the right treatment,

many people can reduce their pain and improve their function, allowing them to return to normal daily activities. Plus, by taking preventative measures and seeking prompt care from our team, it's possible to reduce your risk of developing chronic knee pain and other painful knee conditions. If you've been searching for a non-invasive way to eliminate knee pain and get back to an active life, your journey to recovery starts here.

Let's take a closer look at some of the knee pain treatments available at NJ Sports Spine and Wellness, which all serve as great alternatives to knee replacement surgery.

Physical Therapy:

Optimizing Musculoskeletal Health with Conservative Care

The field of Physical Therapy (PT) aims to rehabilitate individuals who have experienced injury, illness, or disability by restoring their mobility and function. Physical therapists cater to patients of various ages and capabilities, ranging from young athletes to senior citizens, in order to help them surpass physical limitations and improve their standard of living with advanced knee pain treatment in Monmouth Beach, NJ.

At NJ Sports Spine and Wellness, our physical therapy program was founded on a patient-centric philosophy, where physical therapists work closely with patients to get a deep understanding of their goals, preferences, and capabilities. In doing so, they can create a tailor-made treatment strategy to address their unique knee pain with the goal of avoiding a knee replacement. Treatment may involve exercises that are therapeutic in nature and can include:

  • Joint mobilizations
  • Soft tissue mobilization using cupping
  • Graston technique
  • Soft tissue massage
  • Stretching of associated muscle groups

Joint Mobilization for Knee Pain

This unique knee pain solution involves physical therapists using skilled manual therapy techniques to help improve your joint range of motion while simultaneously reducing your knee pain.

During joint mobilization, a physical therapist applies targeted pressures or forces to a joint in specific directions to improve its mobility. The intensity of the force applied can vary, and it is adjusted based on the patient's comfort level. Joint mobilization is generally pain-free.

STM

Soft Tissue Mobilization (STM)

Soft Tissue Mobilization is a manual therapy technique that involves stretching and applying deep pressure to rigid muscle tissue. This helps to relax muscle tension and move fluids that are trapped in the tissues that cause pain and inflammation. This effective form of physical therapy is often used as an advanced knee pain treatment in Monmouth Beach, NJ for treating knee strains, knee sprains, knee pain, and more.

Graston

The Graston Technique

The Graston Technique involves the use of handheld instruments to identify and break up scar tissue through specialized massage. During a Graston Technique session, physical therapists use convex and concave tools for cross-friction massage, which involves rubbing or brushing against the grain of the scar tissue. This process re-introduces small amounts of trauma to the affected area. In some cases, this process temporarily causes inflammation, which can actually boost the amount and rate of blood flow in the knee. This process helps initiate and promote the healing process so you can get back to a normal life.

Massage

Soft Tissue Massage

Soft tissue massage is a less intense form of massage than it's deep-tissue relative. Instead of focusing on slow and firm strokes to reach the deep layers of muscles and tissues, this massage technique uses a variety of pressures, depths, and durations. Soft tissue massage is helpful in alleviating different types of knee aches, pains, and injuries. Soft tissue massages can also help reduce stress, improve circulation, and promote relaxation.

Advanced Mechanics and Technology:

The Future of Knee Pain Therapy

While knee pain is a common symptom that affects millions of Americans every year, no two cases of knee pain are ever exactly alike. Some types of knee injuries require non-traditional solutions. At New Jersey Sports Spine and Wellness, we offer a range of treatments that leverage mechanics and technology to help patients recover from injuries while treating inflammation and pain as well as resolve the root cause of the pain.

AlterAlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill is equipped with NASA Differential Air Pressure (DAP) technology, which is a precise air calibration system that uses the user's actual body weight to enhance rehabilitation and training. By utilizing a pressurized air chamber, the AlterG allows patients and athletes to move without any pain or restrictions.

This advanced knee pain treatment in Monmouth Beach, NJ uniformly reduces gravitational load and body weight up to 80% in precise 1% increments. The results can be incredible, with patients reporting benefits such as:

  • Restoring and building of knee strength
  • Restored range of motion in the knee
  • Better balance
  • Improved knee function
  • More

What Makes the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill So Effective?

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill can monitor various metrics such as speed, gait pattern, stride length, and weight distribution. With real-time feedback and video monitoring, your rehabilitation team can promptly and accurately identify issues and pain points or monitor your progress throughout your knee pain rehabilitation journey.

One of the key benefits of this cutting-edge equipment is that it replicates natural walking and movement patterns without the artificial feel that hydrotherapy or harnesses create. This makes it an excellent choice for faster recovery after knee injuries or surgeries, as it allows for early mobilization while also preserving strength. Furthermore, it is ideal for sports recovery as athletes can use it for physical conditioning maintenance.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Monmouth Beach, NJ
Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Monmouth Beach, NJ

Low-Level Laser Therapy

Our advanced treatment modalities for knee pain include laser therapy, which harnesses the revolutionary power of light through photobiomodulation (PBM). LiteCureâ„¢ low-level laser therapy is available for acute and chronic types of knee pain and can be hugely beneficial when coupled with physical therapy, occupational therapy, chiropractic care, and sports recovery care.

Understanding Photobiomodulation (PBM)

PBM is a medical treatment that harnesses the power of light to stimulate the body's natural healing abilities. The photons from the light penetrate deep into the tissue and interact with mitochondria, which results in a boost in energy production. This interaction sets off a biological chain reaction that increases cellular metabolism. Utilizing low-level light therapy has been shown to:

  • Alleviate knee pain
  • Speed up tissue healing
  • Promote overall health and wellness
  • Expedite knee pain injury recovery
Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Monmouth Beach, NJ

Exclusive Access to

Pain Management Professionals

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we know that every patient requires a personalized approach to chronic knee pain and condition management. Sometimes, our patients need access to pain management professionals, who can offer relief in conjunction with physical therapy and other solutions like low-level laser therapy.

Two of the most common services we offer for pain management includes acupuncture which can assist in avoiding knee replacement surgery.

Acupuncture is a common treatment for knee pain that involves inserting thin needles into specific points in your knee. This ancient Chinese medicine has gained popularity in Western culture due to its effectiveness in treating various conditions with minimal side effects.

Acupuncture works by stimulating the nervous system to release various biochemicals, including endorphins and other neurotransmitters. The release of these chemicals helps to reduce inflammation, decrease pain perception, and improve overall blood circulation.

Multiple studies have shown that acupuncture can be effective in treating knee pain caused by a variety of conditions, including osteoarthritis and injuries related to physical activity like running. Acupuncture can also help reduce inflammation, improve muscle function, and decrease pain perception, making it a viable treatment on its own or as an addition to traditional treatment methods like physical therapy.

When undergoing acupuncture, a professional acupuncturist will insert thin needles into specific acupoints on the skin. These needles are left in place for roughly 20 to 30 minutes and may be gently stimulated for an enhanced effect. Patients might experience a slight tingle or warmth at the needle insertion site, but overall, acupuncture is considered a painless procedure.

Acupuncture has been a trusted and effective treatment option for thousands of years. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes acupuncture as a legitimate form of healthcare, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has even funded research studies to explore its efficacy for a range of medical conditions. To learn more about acupuncture for knee pain, contact NJSSW today.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Monmouth Beach, NJ

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a common treatment for knee pain that involves inserting thin needles into specific points in your knee. This ancient Chinese medicine has gained popularity in Western culture due to its effectiveness in treating various conditions with minimal side effects.

Acupuncture works by stimulating the nervous system to release various biochemicals, including endorphins and other neurotransmitters. The release of these chemicals helps to reduce inflammation, decrease pain perception, and improve overall blood circulation.

Multiple studies have shown that acupuncture can be effective in treating knee pain caused by a variety of conditions, including osteoarthritis and injuries related to physical activity like running. Acupuncture can also help reduce inflammation, improve muscle function, and decrease pain perception, making it a viable treatment on its own or as an addition to traditional treatment methods like physical therapy.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Monmouth Beach, NJ

What Happens During Acupuncture Therapy for Knee Pain?

When undergoing acupuncture, a professional acupuncturist will insert thin needles into specific acupoints on the skin. These needles are left in place for roughly 20 to 30 minutes and may be gently stimulated for an enhanced effect. Patients might experience a slight tingle or warmth at the needle insertion site, but overall, acupuncture is considered a painless procedure.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Monmouth Beach, NJ

Is Acupuncture Actually Effective for Knee Pain?

Acupuncture has been a trusted and effective treatment option for thousands of years. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes acupuncture as a legitimate form of healthcare, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has even funded research studies to explore its efficacy for a range of medical conditions. To learn more about acupuncture for knee pain, contact NJSSW today.

Avoid Knee Replacements with Advanced Knee Pain Treatment in Monmouth Beach, NJ

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Monmouth Beach, NJ

When it comes to knee pain therapies and treatments, getting a knee replacement should be last on your list. Why put your body through such trauma if you haven't tried other non-invasive treatment options? Whether you're an athlete trying to work through a knee injury or you're over 65 and are dealing with osteoarthritis, NJ Sports Spine and Wellness can help.

It all starts with an introductory consultation at our office in Matawan or Marlboro. During your first visit, we'll talk to you about your knee pain symptoms, the goals you have in mind, and the advanced knee pain treatments available to you at our practice. From there, it's only a matter of time before you get back to a healthy, active lifestyle.

Every day you wait can worsen your knee condition. Contact us today and let our team help get you on the road to recovery and life with painful knees.

Latest News in Monmouth Beach, NJ

$3.2M study will reevaluate how to protect this stretch of Jersey Shore beaches

A $3.2 million study will help re-assess how federal engineers protect 21 miles worth of beaches at the Jersey Shore, federal officials said this week.The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is considering reinforced dunes, berm modifications, submerged artificial reefs, groins, flood walls, sand back passing and other measures for the project area.The same slice of coast — which stretches from Sea Bright to Manasquan — ...

A $3.2 million study will help re-assess how federal engineers protect 21 miles worth of beaches at the Jersey Shore, federal officials said this week.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is considering reinforced dunes, berm modifications, submerged artificial reefs, groins, flood walls, sand back passing and other measures for the project area.

The same slice of coast — which stretches from Sea Bright to Manasquan — received an estimated 8 million cubic yards of sand in an emergency replenishment following Hurricane Sandy.

The study will consider some alternatives to a heavy reliance on sand replenishment which has faced some criticism. A federal spokesperson said the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection initiated the reassessment.

“This study aims to reassess the original project from the late 1980s, focusing on addressing erosion issues and possibly incorporating new features like dunes, especially considering the damages from Hurricane Sandy,” Michael Embrich, a spokesperson for the Army Corps of Engineers’ New York District, said Friday.

In a March 2021 letter from the NJDEP to the Army Corps, the state agency said the reassessment was needed as part of additional resilience and risk reduction efforts in the area. It also said the reevaluation was “warranted given current and projected sea level and climate change trends,” according to a copy of the letter provided by the department Tuesday.

Despite some disapproval that it’s become too costly and will not be sustainable over time, federal officials say New Jersey beaches benefit from beach nourishment (usually done every two years) and undergo periodic studies to better understand how the work can be more effective.

Dropping millions of cubic yards of sand as part of the nourishment, or sand replenishment, is on pace to surpass $3 billion in New Jersey. It’s covered by state and federal taxpayers and takes place for flood protection as shore towns and nearby power infrastructure face higher risks due to sea level rise and worsening erosion due to climate change, according to the NJDEP.

Replenishment is also done to ensure beaches remain bountiful for the busy summer when they are an economic driver for Jersey Shore towns, several local mayors have highlighted.

“New Jersey’s coastal infrastructure is its first line of defense in protecting people, property, ecosystems, and the state’s $20 billion annual tourism economy from the impacts of devastating storms,” said Grace Hanlon, executive director of the Jersey Shore Partnership, a not-for-profit organization which supports the replenishment and notes aquatic habitats and bird species benefit from it as well.

The latest analysis will be fully funded by the federal 2022 Disaster Relief Appropriations Act. A public discussion for the study — efforts for which began in October 2022 — was held Nov. 20.

Army Corps officials are still evaluating next steps and gathering more feedback, a spokesman for the agency said.

Ross Kushner, a Sea Bright resident and coordinator of a grassroots group called the New Jersey Coastal Alliance, said federal project managers indicated during a virtual session that severe beach erosion found in two areas was part of the impetus for re-considering how to protect that section of coast.

In a summary on the study, the Army Corps said two areas in Monmouth Beach and Elberon are considered “erosion hotspots.”

“These erosion hotspots require more frequent nourishment than anticipated,” a statement from the agency said. “This redirects re-nourishment funds and sand to these locations, as opposed to other sections of the existing project that could also benefit from sand placement. The study will investigate improvements to these areas to reduce the need for re-nourishment and the risk of erosion.”

As for the strategies being contemplated by federal engineers like dunes, seawalls and groins, Jon Miller — research associate professor at Stevens Institute of Technology — said Friday nearly all have been tried in the Garden State in one form or another (although often in isolation).

“The current study is a bit different in that it is looking at techniques that can enhance the existing project,” said Miller, who is also a board member of the Jersey Shore Partnership.

Kushner said Friday he was pleasantly surprised to hear of the re-assessment. However, he said options as part of new work — like building dunes, breakwaters, groins and even elevating or flood-proofing nearby properties — were simply laid out by the Army Corps in November.

“They presented those measures on equal footing and said they’re reviewing them,” said Kushner, adding that he’d hope to hear how those options were being narrowed down.

The Jersey Shore Partnership said it was sensible for the Army Corps to evaluate how to better protect the coast through the $3.2 million study.

But in a letter to the Army Corps on the project, Kushner said he was wary beach replenishment could impact the environment, nearby habitats and species — such as by possibly reducing the diet of piping plover. That, despite the federal agency saying it considers these factors during its feasibility analysis.

“It is our opinion that the (Army Corps) creates replenished beaches in the manner they do solely for economic reasons, as the cheapest, easiest alternative and with utter disregard for the public, the environment, or New Jersey’s enforceable policies,” Kushner wrote. “Their only goal is to prevent storm damage to the real estate directly facing the ocean in the least costly fashion.”

Miller, director of Stevens’ Coastal Protection Technical Assistance Service, said beach nourishment activities have been shown to impact infauna, invertebrates that live within the matrix of aquatic sediments.

“The scientific literature varies with reports of population recovery ranging from as short as several months or as long as several years, similar to the rates of recovery reported after extreme storm events,” said Miller. “What is clear is that beach nourishment creates and sustains habitats for a number of species such as the red knot, piping plover, and sea beach amaranth.”

The Army Corps said it plans more outreach to gather additional comments surrounding its coastal protection between Sea Bright and Manasquan.

A protection project, the agency said in a recent statement, that has so far “performed well during extreme storm conditions and has been successful in reducing the magnitude of storm damages” but could be modified “to better reduce coastal flood risk.”

A timeline for the study was not immediately provided.

Mystery tar balls found on Jersey Shore beaches

LONG BRANCH, New Jersey (WABC) -- The Coast Guard and several other agencies in New Jersey are investigating after tar balls were discovered along the Jersey Shore on Long Branch and Monmouth beaches.Officials in the area say they have no clue where they came from.The Coast Guard received reports of tar balls ranging in size from approximately 1-2 inches and smaller near Seven Presidents Oceanfront Park on Tuesday morning.Tar balls are created when crude oil floats on the ocean's surface. Waves and wind begin tearing the...

LONG BRANCH, New Jersey (WABC) -- The Coast Guard and several other agencies in New Jersey are investigating after tar balls were discovered along the Jersey Shore on Long Branch and Monmouth beaches.

Officials in the area say they have no clue where they came from.

The Coast Guard received reports of tar balls ranging in size from approximately 1-2 inches and smaller near Seven Presidents Oceanfront Park on Tuesday morning.

Tar balls are created when crude oil floats on the ocean's surface. Waves and wind begin tearing the oil slick into smaller and smaller pieces and the water starts changing its physical characteristics.

According to NOAA, tar balls are usually the remnants of an oil spill, but can also be produced by "natural seeps." That's when oil or natural gas leaks through fractures and sediments on the ocean floor.

Officials in New Jersey dispatched a pollution response team to investigate.

A Coast Guard Air Station Atlantic City conducted a flight of the area to look for any oil pollution in the water. No oil was observed in the water during the flight.

Beachgoers and mariners are advised to avoid contact with the tar balls.

Anyone who notices any tar balls or oil sheen in the area should contact the National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802.

There are no reports of impacted wildlife at this time.

ALSO READ | NJ community mourns teen stabbed to death during brawl outside club in Manhattan

----------

* Get Eyewitness News Delivered

* More New Jersey news

* Send us a news tip

* Download the abc7NY app for breaking news alerts

* Follow us on YouTube

Submit a tip or story idea to Eyewitness News

Have a breaking news tip or an idea for a story we should cover? Send it to Eyewitness News using the form below. If attaching a video or photo, terms of use apply.

Pallone Announces Next Phase of Beach Replenishment and Dredging at the Monmouth County Shore

MONMOUTH BEACH, NJ—Congressman Frank Pallone, Jr. (NJ-06) today announced the next phase of beach replenishment and dredging projects in Monmouth County. Pallone secured $26 million for maintenance dredging of the federal channels along the Shrewsbury and Navesink Rivers in a federal spending bill for Fiscal Year 2023 that President Biden signed into law late last year.The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) will begin the second phase of the dredging project this week along the Shrewsbury and Navesink Rivers. The area to be dr...

MONMOUTH BEACH, NJ—Congressman Frank Pallone, Jr. (NJ-06) today announced the next phase of beach replenishment and dredging projects in Monmouth County. Pallone secured $26 million for maintenance dredging of the federal channels along the Shrewsbury and Navesink Rivers in a federal spending bill for Fiscal Year 2023 that President Biden signed into law late last year.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) will begin the second phase of the dredging project this week along the Shrewsbury and Navesink Rivers. The area to be dredged runs south along the Shrewsbury River from the Rumson-Sea Bright Bridge to the Branchport Avenue Bridge in Long Branch. It runs west along the Navesink River from Sea Bright to the Route 35 Bridge between Red Bank and the Navesink Section of Middletown Township. The dredged sand will then be used for beach replenishment and pumped onto the beach across from the Monmouth Beach Cultural Center.

Beach replenishment from offshore burrow pits is expected to begin around December 7 in two areas of Monmouth County. Sand will be pumped in Monmouth Beach south of the Monmouth Beach Bath and Tennis Club to the Monmouth Beach Bathing Pavilion. Sand will also be pumped in Long Branch from Cedar Avenue in the West End Section to Pavilion Avenue in the Elberon Section of the city.

Sign Up for FREE Long Branch Newsletter

Get local news you can trust in your inbox.

The majority of the dredging project should be completed by the end of year. Beach replenishment should be completed by March 2024 at the latest. The dredging project is paid for by the federal government. Beach replenishment is paid 65% by the federal government and the other 35% is split 75% by the state and 25% by Monmouth County and the affected municipalities.

“I’m proud to announce the next phase of the Shrewsbury and Navesink dredging project today. I secured $26 million in federal funding for the project, because protecting our waterways and replenishing our beaches are both essential to bolster the resiliency of the Jersey Shore,” said Pallone. “I’m grateful for the Army Corps of Engineers’ commitment to this important project in our state. The dredging will make our rivers safer and more accessible, while beach replenishment will protect residents and help ensure our renowned beaches remain enjoyable for residents and tourists for years to come.”

“Thank you to our federal officials for their continued support with local beach replenishment and the dredging projects in Monmouth County. These projects are very important to Long Branch and the surrounding Jersey Shore area,” said Long Branch Mayor John Pallone.

"Monmouth Beach is a town located between the Shrewsbury River and the Atlantic Ocean. As such, it is of vital importance to maintain our waterways and beach,” said Monmouth Beach Mayor David Stickle. “We thank Congressman Pallone for his continuing efforts to help protect our town from future storm damage with this and other critical projects. "

“I’m very pleased to be announcing the next phase of the vital work to maintenance dredge the Shrewsbury and Navesink Rivers, which will also include beach replenishment of both Long Branch and Monmouth Beach,” said Colonel Alex Young, Commander, USACE, New York District. “This work will have multiple benefits, including maintenance dredging of a key federal navigation channel and coastal storm risk reduction for surrounding communities in both Long Branch and Monmouth Beach where we will use the sand to increase resiliency. I’d like to thank Rep. Pallone for his continued support of this project as well as our partners at New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, our local partners and the dedicated men and women from New York District, who’ve worked tirelessly on this project. We couldn’t have made this possible without a tremendous amount of support from the entire team top to bottom.”

Unified Command continues investigation into tar balls, cleanup begins in Monmouth Beach

Unified Command members investigate the discovery of tar balls on the beaches in Monmouth County. Photo by U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Schultz. MONMOUTH BEACH — The unified command composed of the Coast Guard, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Monmouth County, continued their response today to reports of tar balls on the beach from Sea Bright south to Asbury Park, with cleanup operations today focused on Monmouth Beach and Lo...

Unified Command members investigate the discovery of tar balls on the beaches in Monmouth County. Photo by U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 2nd Class Ryan Schultz.

MONMOUTH BEACH — The unified command composed of the Coast Guard, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Monmouth County, continued their response today to reports of tar balls on the beach from Sea Bright south to Asbury Park, with cleanup operations today focused on Monmouth Beach and Long Branch, where the heaviest concentration of tar balls has been observed.

The Coast Guard has opened the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund and contracted Ken’s Marine, an oil spill removal organization, to conduct shoreline assessments and cleanup operations.

Operations are scheduled to continue through the day tomorrow in the other impacted areas.

Response crews from the Coast Guard, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Monmouth County and the National Park Service completed shoreline assessments. Shoreline assessments were conducted from Sandy Hook to Asbury Park to locate and document the extent of tar balls present.

Focus areas included Gateway National Park at Sandy Hook and the communities of Sea Bright, Monmouth Beach, Long Branch, Deal, Allenhurst and Asbury Park.

There are no reports of broader impact to the environment of wildlife at this time.

(This story is continued under the ad)

Coast Guard Air Station Atlantic City conducted an overflight of the area Tuesday to identify any oil pollution in the water. No oil was observed in the water during the flight.

The source of the tar balls remains under investigation. Assisting agencies include:• U.S. Coast Guard Sector New York• U.S. Coast Guard Sector Delaware Bay• NOAA• U.S. National Park Service• U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service• New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection• Monmouth County Sheriffs Office of Emergency Management• Monmouth County Health/HAZMAT Department• Long Branch Office of Emergency Management

Coast Guard Sector New York received initial reports of tar balls ranging in size from approximately 1-2 inches and smaller near Seven Presidents Oceanfront Park in Long Branch Tuesday and dispatched pollution response personnel to investigate.

Beach goers and mariners are advised to avoid contact with the tar balls. Anyone who notices any tar balls or oil sheen in the area should contact the National Response Center at 1-800-424-8802.

'Monmouth Beach Rising' video to spotlight rising sea level

MONMOUTH BEACH — Four New Jersey community-based organizations (CBOs) recently received funding to work with regional artists to develop community-engaged art projects that communicate climate risks to the public. These projects were made possible through funding awarded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Coastal Management Program (CMP).Among the four groups selected were Monmouth Arts and artist Allison Hunter. Hunter will create “M...

MONMOUTH BEACH — Four New Jersey community-based organizations (CBOs) recently received funding to work with regional artists to develop community-engaged art projects that communicate climate risks to the public. These projects were made possible through funding awarded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Coastal Management Program (CMP).

Among the four groups selected were Monmouth Arts and artist Allison Hunter. Hunter will create “Monmouth Beach Rising,” a multimedia event inspired by the rising sea level threatening the coastal community of Monmouth Beach. The video content will feature actual footage of bay area water and sound that the artist will capture over the course of the next six-months.

The event will feature a community discussion including the artist and community leaders in flood water issues in the Monmouth Beach area.

Since 2019, the CMP has partnered with the New Jersey State Council on the Arts (Arts Council) to develop and implement a Community-Based Art Grant Program, which - as part of a larger risk communications campaign - addresses the need to involve and inform the public about coastal hazard impacts and what actions they can take to reduce their risk. “The Arts Council has been a partner with the CMP since the inception of the program,” said Allison Tratner, Executive Director of the State Arts Council. “We applaud both NOAA and the DEP for taking the opportunity to capitalize on the unique ability of artists and art to connect communities around issues of climate resilience and risk.”

The CBOs and artists work together to address the theme of climate resilience and coastal flooding through original, site-specific artwork and community engagement events. The purpose is to engage communities in new ways, increasing awareness and understanding of flooding risks in the coastal zone, and introduce the other risk communication tools being produced by the CMP through this project.

"Since the launch of the Community-Based Art Grant Program in 2019, it has been incredibly exciting to see a variety of local artists, community organizations, climate scientists, and municipalities come together to learn about their local coasts and the risks they are facing,” said Nick Angarone, NJ Chief Resilience Officer. "This program enables these groups to bring that shared knowledge to the public through innovative, immersive art projects. I am looking forward to seeing what unique installations this next cohort of artists and organizations create for their communities." “I’m honored to work closely with the State Arts Council in their mission to serve and support artists, organizations, and communities throughout the state,” said Lieutenant Governor Tahesha Way, who oversees the Council in her capacity as Secretary of State. “I look forward to seeing these installations created over the coming months and watching as communities come together to spark important conversations around environmental protection and the preservation of our coastal communities.” The other three groups selected to participate are:• Artworks Trenton.• Perkins Center for the Arts.• WheatonArts - Taral Thompson.

Planned projects will be opened for public exhibition and/or participation beginning this Spring.

About the New Jersey State Council on the ArtsThe New Jersey State Council on the Arts, created in 1966, is a division of the NJ Department of State and a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts. The Council was established to encourage and foster public interest in the arts; enlarge public and private resources devoted to the arts; promote freedom of expression in the arts; and facilitate the inclusion of art in every public building in New Jersey. The Council believes the arts are central to every element we value most in a modern society including: human understanding; cultural and civic pride; strong communities; excellent schools; lifelong learning; creative expression; and economic opportunity. To learn more about the Council, please visit www.artscouncil.nj.gov.

About the Coastal Management ProgramNew Jersey’s Coastal Management Program works with and provides resources to communities across New Jersey’s coastal zone. Through collaborative partnerships with municipalities, federal agencies, and NGOs, the program works to address New Jersey’s most pressing coastal issues, including resilient coastal community planning, climate change, ocean planning, public access, wetlands, and coastal restoration.

To learn more about the Coastal Management Program, please visit www.nj.gov/dep/cmp.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.
Contact Us