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Knee Pain Treatment & Specialist

In Keasbey, NJ

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Advanced Knee Pain Treatment in Keasbey, NJ

Are you experiencing knee pain symptoms such as popping, clicking, bone-on-bone grinding, achiness, or sharp stabs? You're not alone in this journey. Knee pain affects nearly 25% of adults in the United States, causing discomfort, swelling, and chronic pain that can hinder everyday activities like childcare, walking, and exercise. Shockingly, recent statistics from The American Academy of Family Physicians indicate a 65% increase in diagnosed knee pain cases.

In a world where invasive surgeries and prescription painkillers are often the default solutions, it's crucial to explore the effective non-invasive options that are available. These alternative treatments provide relief without the associated risks of surgery.

Today, many doctors still recommend invasive surgeries and prescription painkillers rather than exploring non-invasive options. While those treatments are needed in some circumstances, there are alternative treatments available that can help you overcome knee pain without needing to go under the knife.

NJ Sports Spine and Wellness' advanced knee pain treatment in Keasbey, NJ gives men and women suffering from knee pain hope. Instead of relying on surgery, our team of doctors and physical therapists use non-invasive, highly effective treatments to help heal prevalent conditions such as:

Service Areas

Arthritis

Soft tissue injury

ACL tears

MCL tears

Patella dislocation

Misalignment of the kneecap

Patella tendonitis

Jumper's knee

Osgood Schlatter's Disease

Knee

With the right treatment,

many people can reduce their pain and improve their function, allowing them to return to normal daily activities. Plus, by taking preventative measures and seeking prompt care from our team, it's possible to reduce your risk of developing chronic knee pain and other painful knee conditions. If you've been searching for a non-invasive way to eliminate knee pain and get back to an active life, your journey to recovery starts here.

Let's take a closer look at some of the knee pain treatments available at NJ Sports Spine and Wellness, which all serve as great alternatives to knee replacement surgery.

Physical Therapy:

Optimizing Musculoskeletal Health with Conservative Care

The field of Physical Therapy (PT) aims to rehabilitate individuals who have experienced injury, illness, or disability by restoring their mobility and function. Physical therapists cater to patients of various ages and capabilities, ranging from young athletes to senior citizens, in order to help them surpass physical limitations and improve their standard of living with advanced knee pain treatment in Keasbey, NJ.

At NJ Sports Spine and Wellness, our physical therapy program was founded on a patient-centric philosophy, where physical therapists work closely with patients to get a deep understanding of their goals, preferences, and capabilities. In doing so, they can create a tailor-made treatment strategy to address their unique knee pain with the goal of avoiding a knee replacement. Treatment may involve exercises that are therapeutic in nature and can include:

  • Joint mobilizations
  • Soft tissue mobilization using cupping
  • Graston technique
  • Soft tissue massage
  • Stretching of associated muscle groups

Joint Mobilization for Knee Pain

This unique knee pain solution involves physical therapists using skilled manual therapy techniques to help improve your joint range of motion while simultaneously reducing your knee pain.

During joint mobilization, a physical therapist applies targeted pressures or forces to a joint in specific directions to improve its mobility. The intensity of the force applied can vary, and it is adjusted based on the patient's comfort level. Joint mobilization is generally pain-free.

STM

Soft Tissue Mobilization (STM)

Soft Tissue Mobilization is a manual therapy technique that involves stretching and applying deep pressure to rigid muscle tissue. This helps to relax muscle tension and move fluids that are trapped in the tissues that cause pain and inflammation. This effective form of physical therapy is often used as an advanced knee pain treatment in Keasbey, NJ for treating knee strains, knee sprains, knee pain, and more.

Graston

The Graston Technique

The Graston Technique involves the use of handheld instruments to identify and break up scar tissue through specialized massage. During a Graston Technique session, physical therapists use convex and concave tools for cross-friction massage, which involves rubbing or brushing against the grain of the scar tissue. This process re-introduces small amounts of trauma to the affected area. In some cases, this process temporarily causes inflammation, which can actually boost the amount and rate of blood flow in the knee. This process helps initiate and promote the healing process so you can get back to a normal life.

Massage

Soft Tissue Massage

Soft tissue massage is a less intense form of massage than it's deep-tissue relative. Instead of focusing on slow and firm strokes to reach the deep layers of muscles and tissues, this massage technique uses a variety of pressures, depths, and durations. Soft tissue massage is helpful in alleviating different types of knee aches, pains, and injuries. Soft tissue massages can also help reduce stress, improve circulation, and promote relaxation.

Advanced Mechanics and Technology:

The Future of Knee Pain Therapy

While knee pain is a common symptom that affects millions of Americans every year, no two cases of knee pain are ever exactly alike. Some types of knee injuries require non-traditional solutions. At New Jersey Sports Spine and Wellness, we offer a range of treatments that leverage mechanics and technology to help patients recover from injuries while treating inflammation and pain as well as resolve the root cause of the pain.

AlterAlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill is equipped with NASA Differential Air Pressure (DAP) technology, which is a precise air calibration system that uses the user's actual body weight to enhance rehabilitation and training. By utilizing a pressurized air chamber, the AlterG allows patients and athletes to move without any pain or restrictions.

This advanced knee pain treatment in Keasbey, NJ uniformly reduces gravitational load and body weight up to 80% in precise 1% increments. The results can be incredible, with patients reporting benefits such as:

  • Restoring and building of knee strength
  • Restored range of motion in the knee
  • Better balance
  • Improved knee function
  • More

What Makes the AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill So Effective?

The AlterG® Anti-Gravity Treadmill can monitor various metrics such as speed, gait pattern, stride length, and weight distribution. With real-time feedback and video monitoring, your rehabilitation team can promptly and accurately identify issues and pain points or monitor your progress throughout your knee pain rehabilitation journey.

One of the key benefits of this cutting-edge equipment is that it replicates natural walking and movement patterns without the artificial feel that hydrotherapy or harnesses create. This makes it an excellent choice for faster recovery after knee injuries or surgeries, as it allows for early mobilization while also preserving strength. Furthermore, it is ideal for sports recovery as athletes can use it for physical conditioning maintenance.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Keasbey, NJ
Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Keasbey, NJ

Low-Level Laser Therapy

Our advanced treatment modalities for knee pain include laser therapy, which harnesses the revolutionary power of light through photobiomodulation (PBM). LiteCureâ„¢ low-level laser therapy is available for acute and chronic types of knee pain and can be hugely beneficial when coupled with physical therapy, occupational therapy, chiropractic care, and sports recovery care.

Understanding Photobiomodulation (PBM)

PBM is a medical treatment that harnesses the power of light to stimulate the body's natural healing abilities. The photons from the light penetrate deep into the tissue and interact with mitochondria, which results in a boost in energy production. This interaction sets off a biological chain reaction that increases cellular metabolism. Utilizing low-level light therapy has been shown to:

  • Alleviate knee pain
  • Speed up tissue healing
  • Promote overall health and wellness
  • Expedite knee pain injury recovery
Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Keasbey, NJ

Exclusive Access to

Pain Management Professionals

At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, we know that every patient requires a personalized approach to chronic knee pain and condition management. Sometimes, our patients need access to pain management professionals, who can offer relief in conjunction with physical therapy and other solutions like low-level laser therapy.

Two of the most common services we offer for pain management includes acupuncture which can assist in avoiding knee replacement surgery.

Acupuncture is a common treatment for knee pain that involves inserting thin needles into specific points in your knee. This ancient Chinese medicine has gained popularity in Western culture due to its effectiveness in treating various conditions with minimal side effects.

Acupuncture works by stimulating the nervous system to release various biochemicals, including endorphins and other neurotransmitters. The release of these chemicals helps to reduce inflammation, decrease pain perception, and improve overall blood circulation.

Multiple studies have shown that acupuncture can be effective in treating knee pain caused by a variety of conditions, including osteoarthritis and injuries related to physical activity like running. Acupuncture can also help reduce inflammation, improve muscle function, and decrease pain perception, making it a viable treatment on its own or as an addition to traditional treatment methods like physical therapy.

When undergoing acupuncture, a professional acupuncturist will insert thin needles into specific acupoints on the skin. These needles are left in place for roughly 20 to 30 minutes and may be gently stimulated for an enhanced effect. Patients might experience a slight tingle or warmth at the needle insertion site, but overall, acupuncture is considered a painless procedure.

Acupuncture has been a trusted and effective treatment option for thousands of years. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes acupuncture as a legitimate form of healthcare, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has even funded research studies to explore its efficacy for a range of medical conditions. To learn more about acupuncture for knee pain, contact NJSSW today.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Keasbey, NJ

Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a common treatment for knee pain that involves inserting thin needles into specific points in your knee. This ancient Chinese medicine has gained popularity in Western culture due to its effectiveness in treating various conditions with minimal side effects.

Acupuncture works by stimulating the nervous system to release various biochemicals, including endorphins and other neurotransmitters. The release of these chemicals helps to reduce inflammation, decrease pain perception, and improve overall blood circulation.

Multiple studies have shown that acupuncture can be effective in treating knee pain caused by a variety of conditions, including osteoarthritis and injuries related to physical activity like running. Acupuncture can also help reduce inflammation, improve muscle function, and decrease pain perception, making it a viable treatment on its own or as an addition to traditional treatment methods like physical therapy.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Keasbey, NJ

What Happens During Acupuncture Therapy for Knee Pain?

When undergoing acupuncture, a professional acupuncturist will insert thin needles into specific acupoints on the skin. These needles are left in place for roughly 20 to 30 minutes and may be gently stimulated for an enhanced effect. Patients might experience a slight tingle or warmth at the needle insertion site, but overall, acupuncture is considered a painless procedure.

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Keasbey, NJ

Is Acupuncture Actually Effective for Knee Pain?

Acupuncture has been a trusted and effective treatment option for thousands of years. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes acupuncture as a legitimate form of healthcare, and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has even funded research studies to explore its efficacy for a range of medical conditions. To learn more about acupuncture for knee pain, contact NJSSW today.

Avoid Knee Replacements with Advanced Knee Pain Treatment in Keasbey, NJ

Advanced Knee Pain Treatment Keasbey, NJ

When it comes to knee pain therapies and treatments, getting a knee replacement should be last on your list. Why put your body through such trauma if you haven't tried other non-invasive treatment options? Whether you're an athlete trying to work through a knee injury or you're over 65 and are dealing with osteoarthritis, NJ Sports Spine and Wellness can help.

It all starts with an introductory consultation at our office in Matawan or Marlboro. During your first visit, we'll talk to you about your knee pain symptoms, the goals you have in mind, and the advanced knee pain treatments available to you at our practice. From there, it's only a matter of time before you get back to a healthy, active lifestyle.

Every day you wait can worsen your knee condition. Contact us today and let our team help get you on the road to recovery and life with painful knees.

Latest News in Keasbey, NJ

3 New NJ Power Plants Coming, 2 Will Definitely Use Natural Gas

Despite opposition from many surrounding towns, three new power plants are poised to open, in Newark, Kearny and Woodbridge:Patch Staff|Updated Thu, Apr 21, 2022 at 9:51 am ETWOODBRIDGE, NJ — Three power plants are coming to New Jersey, proposed to open in Newark, Kearny and the Keasbey section of Woodbridge.NJ Transit wants to open the power plant in Kearny and the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission is pushing for the power plant in Newark.The Woodbridge power plant will be owned by a private compa...

Despite opposition from many surrounding towns, three new power plants are poised to open, in Newark, Kearny and Woodbridge:

Patch Staff

|Updated Thu, Apr 21, 2022 at 9:51 am ET

WOODBRIDGE, NJ — Three power plants are coming to New Jersey, proposed to open in Newark, Kearny and the Keasbey section of Woodbridge.

NJ Transit wants to open the power plant in Kearny and the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission is pushing for the power plant in Newark.

The Woodbridge power plant will be owned by a private company, Competitive Power Ventures, which is now owned by OPC Energy, a massive international energy conglomerate.

None of the plants have proposed opening dates yet, and there is considerable community push-back to all three being built. The Woodbridge plant will use fracked natural gas, which is natural gas obtained by fracking methods. However, NJ Transit has backed off a plan to use natural gas for its proposed plant in Kearny.

NJ Transit said it has "reimagined (this) project to maximize clean energy and renewables," but was not more specific on what renewable energy sources their plant will use.

Find out what's happening in Woodbridgewith free, real-time updates from Patch.

Similarly, the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission originally planned to use all natural gas, but now says they will use a mix of natural gas and a renewable fuel, with plans to use all renewable energy by 2030.

New Jersey environmental activists say Gov. Phil Murphy hasn't done enough to stop the plants from opening. Murphy's office did not respond for a request for comment for this article.

1. The Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission plant in Newark

The power plant will be located next to the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission's existing sewage treatment facility in the Ironbound section, at 600 Wilson Avenue in Newark. This is the largest sewage processing facility in the state.

The plant will be owned and operated by the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission, which is investing $180 million to build it. The Sewerage Commission said they desperately need a source of back-up power: In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, their sewage treatment facility in Newark flooded, spilling billions of gallons of raw sewage into the Passaic River. Since then, the Commission said it needs to build a plant to provide backup power to their wastewater treatment plant should the grid go down again.

A spokesperson for the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission previously told Patch that the facility would be powered by "the same natural gas that people all across Newark and New Jersey in general use to heat their homes and from which they also obtain electrical power. The plant will use state-of-the-art emission controls with negligible impact to the community."

But now, the Sewerage Commission says it has revised its plans and proposes to start operation of the plant with a mix of natural gas and a renewable fuel. The Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission anticipates full conversion to using a 100 percent renewable fuel by 2030.

The Sewerage Commission said they made these "substantial revisions in response to community concerns." They said using a mix of natural gas and renewables will "substantially reduce air emissions from PVSC’s day-to-day operations and improve air quality in the surrounding community."

The Sewerage Commission also planned to run the facility to offset their power needs from the grid at other times, thus lowering their energy costs. However — again due to community concerns — the Commission withdrew its request to the state Department of Environmental Protection for that last July.

In January, the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission was scheduled to vote to award a contract to begin building the new power plant. But that same month, a spokesman for Gov. Murphy said he asked the PVSC to postpone the vote, to allow for "a more thorough environmental justice review and robust public engagement process," said Murphy's spokeswoman.

"We're going to move forward in a realistic and environmentally responsible way, Passaic Valley Sewage Commission Chairman Thomas Tucci told Patch at the time.

The Sewerage Commission will now hold a virtual public hearing on the power plant on April 26. If you'd like to attend, here is how to sign up: https://web.pvsc.com/bnews/Sta...

2. The NJ Transit power plant in Kearny

Similar to the Sewerage Commission, NJ Transit says they need to open a power plant in Kearny to provide back-up power for the proposed NJ TransitGrid, a proposed "clean-energy" grid that would power some of the NJ Transit railroad and Hudson-Bergen Light Rail.

Just like the Sewerage Commission, NJ Transit says they need the back-up power because they lost all power to run trains and light rail when Sandy hit.

The proposed location for the NJ Transit power plant is in an industrial zone in Kearny. There is no projected opening date, as the power plant is still in design stages.

NJ Transit filed an air permit application for the power plant in Nov. 20, 2018 and it was withdrawn on Jan. 14, 2021. This is because an NJ Transit spokesman said April 8 that the transit agency has "reimagined (this) project to maximize clean energy and renewables."

NJ Transit is currently awaiting design proposals for the plant from four outside firms.

3. The natural gas plant in Woodbridge, owned by a private company

In Woodbridge, Competitive Power Ventures (CPV) seeks to open a 630-megawatt plant.

This would be their second natural gas plant in Keasby and the power company seeks to open it next to their existing plant that is there now. Keasbey has long been an industrial section of Woodbridge.

CPV is currently requesting an air pollution permit from the New Jersey Department of the Environmental Protection.

As of this week, the DEP has not yet approved or rejected their application.

"The DEP is working with the facility on updating their air impact analysis to incorporate the latest version of the air quality model used and the most recent meteorological data," said DEP spokeswoman Caryn Shinske on April 8. "Competitive Power Ventures also is working with the DEP to comply with the requirements of Administrative Order 2021-25."

Some environmental groups against all three plants

There is considerable opposition to the power plants: A environmental non-profit called Food & Water Watch is actively working to stop all three from opening.

According to Food & Water Watch, combined with its existing power plant, the Woodbridge facility would emit 4.6 million tons of greenhouse gases per year — becoming by far the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in the state.

"If approved, the expanded CPV facility would emit more than 2.3 million metric tons of greenhouse gasses each year, and would be one of the largest single sources of climate-destroying carbon emissions in the entire state," said Charlie Kratovil, of Food & Water Watch. "We are calling on Murphy and his Department of Environmental Protection to reject CPV’s air permit application. If Gov. Murphy wants us to believe he is ready to be a climate leader, he will reject the Keasbey plant."

The group says the Murphy administration should reject all three power plants and find a renewable energy alternative.

"If Gov. Murphy wants to live up to his clean energy, environmental justice, and climate commitments, he must direct PVSC to immediately withdraw its air permit application for this power plant and re-write their proposal," said Bill McClelland with Food & Water Watch on April 8.

And many towns near these proposed plants say they don't want the plants in their backyards, or even nearby: The town of Jersey City, Kearny, Secaucus, Union City, Bayonne, Weehawken and Hoboken have all passed formal resolutions opposing the Newark and Kearny plants. The towns of Livingston, Maplewood and Alpine have passed resolutions opposing the plants, as well.

This week, Highland Park issued a formal resolution against the Woodbridge power plant.

With reporting from Eric Kiefer/Patch

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Stop Woodbridge's 2nd Natural Gas Power Plant, NJ Residents Beg Murphy

WOODBRIDGE, NJ — In 2020, to great fanfare, Gov. Phil Murphy signed this environmental justice law, which he called one of the toughest in the nation.And last week, at a Feb. 28 hearing on a second natural gas power plant proposed for Keasbey, some New Jersey residents asked why the governor is not enforcing his own law to stop the plant from being built."Two weeks ago Gov. Murphy said the new policy of the state is to get to 100 percent clea...

WOODBRIDGE, NJ — In 2020, to great fanfare, Gov. Phil Murphy signed this environmental justice law, which he called one of the toughest in the nation.

And last week, at a Feb. 28 hearing on a second natural gas power plant proposed for Keasbey, some New Jersey residents asked why the governor is not enforcing his own law to stop the plant from being built.

"Two weeks ago Gov. Murphy said the new policy of the state is to get to 100 percent clean energy by 2035. It is a really radical idea," said Bloomfield resident Ed Glick at the hearing. "It's a good goal, but this project is very much alive. It is frankly just hypocritical. It's hard to swallow that. This thing of saying one thing and doing something else has to stop. This is a great place to stop it. This dirty, polluting, totally unnecessary plant that is all about the bottom line for the company."

“The proposed Keasbey fossil fuel plant would go directly against Gov. Murphy’s goal for New Jersey to achieve 100 percent clean electricity by 2035,” Tiziana Bottino of the New Jersey Sierra Club said March 1 in this press release.

A media spokesman for the governor did not respond to Patch for this article.

Find out what's happening in Woodbridgewith free, real-time updates from Patch.

In his second term in office, Gov. Murphy unveiled plans that will dramatically increase New Jersey's electricity consumption:

Last month, he announced he wants only all-electric cars to be sold in the state by 2035. Murphy’s Energy Master Plan would require New Jersey residents heat their homes with electric only, and only use electric ovens and stoves. Murphy has said he will power New Jersey's massive spike in electric needs by building thousands of acres of wind farms off the coast, turning the Atlantic Ocean off the Jersey Shore into the largest wind farm in the world, an idea backed by President Joe Biden.

In fact, at the Feb. 28 hearing a spokesman for Competitive Power Ventures — the energy company that wants to build the natural gas plant — said one of the goals of the plant is to specifically provide a back-up if renewable energy from wind or solar does not work.

"As more renewables come online, we are seeing a greater need for flexibility in the system," said the CPV spokesman. "So the point of the Keasbey plant is to help maintain that reliability, keep the lights on."

150 people speak against power plant at 3-hour long Feb. 28 hearing

CPV was required by the state to hold last Tuesday's virtual public hearing.

Of the more than 150 people who signed up to speak at the three-hour long hearing (which you can watch here), Woodbridge residents were given priority, as they will be the most affected by emissions and air pollution from the plant.

"We live a mile away from the first power plant and totally disagree with another power plant in the area," said a Keasbey woman.

"I've been a resident of Woodbridge for 18 years. I wish our town council would oppose this project," said Colonia resident Jean Roy at the hearing. "I suffer from asthma related to air pollution. We have enough pollution here: We have ports in the area; the Turnpike, the Parkway go through town; there's already existing power plants in Woodbridge. We need to move away as quickly as possible from fossil fuels."

"It would be nice to have a plant built in one of the more affluent, prettier areas," he added. "I strongly urge the governor and the DEP to reject this plant."

If the state approves it, this would be CPV's second natural gas-fired power plant in Woodbridge's Keasbey section.

Since 2016, CPV has operated the Woodbridge Energy Center, a 725-megawatt power plant that the company says is one of the most efficient fossil fuel plants on the East Coast. At the Feb. 28 hearing, a CPV spokesman said the Woodbridge Energy Center is so clean it offsets six million tons of Co2 emissions from other plants in America. He also said the plant reuses grey water from the Middlesex County Water Treatment Authority.

The CPV spokesman also said the greenhouse gas emissions from the new plant would be "at the lowest level achievable in the U.S. from a natural gas-fired electric generating station."

Woodbridge Mayor John McCormac repeatedly has called the Woodbridge Energy Center "one of the cleanest plants" in the state. McCormac supports the second plant opening, citing jobs and increased tax revenue to Woodbridge Township.

"If anything, the technology has gotten better regarding emissions, so the second plant will clearly be cleaner than the first," McCormac said just last week.

Keasbey an "overburdened community," state already determined

This second proposed plant will be located immediately adjacent to CPV's existing facility. This new proposed plant will be a 657-megawatt combined natural gas facility. It will used natural gas obtained by fracking methods.

The plant will provide enough electricity for more than 600,000 homes. The CPV spokesman did not say the electricity produced by the plant will go to Woodbridge or even New Jersey residents: Instead, it will be pumped back into the grid.

"One hundred percent of the power from this plant will be sold out of state for profit," warned Matt Smith of Food & Water Watch at the Tuesday hearing. "While the pollution will stay here — not just in Woodbridge and Keasbey, but Perth Amboy and dozens of communities downwind. Gov. Murphy must deny and reject this project."

The 2020 law signed by Murphy specifically "requires mandatory permit denials (to gas-fired power plants) if an environmental justice analysis determines a new facility will have a disproportionately negative impact on overburdened communities" — determined by having a substantial number of low-income or minority residents.

Woodbridge's Keasbey section classifies as one of these "overburdened communities."

When an Associated Press reporter asked the governor's office about this last week, he was referred to the state Department of Environmental Protection. DEP spokesman Larry Hajna said Competitive Power Ventures applied in 2017 for the air quality permit to open the second plant, before the 2020 law was written.

At the hearing, a small handful of people — most of them from the labor trade unions — spoke in support of the second plant, saying it will bring union jobs.

CPV is still waiting on a half-dozen environmental permits from the state and federal government, including that key air pollution permit it requested from the NJ DEP more than five years ago, in 2017.

New Brunswick newspaper New Brunswick Today uploaded the hearing to YouTube. Watch it here:

Ongoing Patch reporting on 2nd proposed natural gas power plant in Woodbridge:

Woodbridge Residents Speak For And Against 2nd Natural Gas Power Plant (Feb. 27, 2023)

3 New NJ Power Plants Coming, 2 Will Definitely Use Natural Gas (April 2022)

Woodbridge Fire Departments Install New Top Brass

Sworn in as officers with Keasbey Protection Fire Company No 1 are Chief Luis Montalvo; Deputy Chief Jack Croft; Captain John Manna; and Lieutenant Richard Polidura.Several of Woodbridge's independent fire departments marked New Year’s Day by administering oaths of office to their new 2024 leaders.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTSSworn in as officers with Fords Fire Company No. 1 are Chief Howie Bauer; 1st Assistant Chief John Dimitrakis; 2nd Assistant Chief Robert Somes; Ca...

Sworn in as officers with Keasbey Protection Fire Company No 1 are Chief Luis Montalvo; Deputy Chief Jack Croft; Captain John Manna; and Lieutenant Richard Polidura.

Several of Woodbridge's independent fire departments marked New Year’s Day by administering oaths of office to their new 2024 leaders.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTS

Sworn in as officers with Fords Fire Company No. 1 are Chief Howie Bauer; 1st Assistant Chief John Dimitrakis; 2nd Assistant Chief Robert Somes; Captain Eric Pado and 1st Lieutenant Gary Nebus.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTS

Officers who took oaths with Hopelawn Engine Company are Chief Michael Walsh; Assistant Chief Nicholas Natale; Captain Jaime Nieves; 1st Lieutenant Brian Turcotte; and 2nd Lieutenant Anthony Natale.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTS

Sworn in as officers with Keasbey Protection Fire Company No 1 are Chief Luis Montalvo; Deputy Chief Jack Croft; Captain John Manna; and Lieutenant Richard Polidura.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTS

Several of Woodbridge's independent fire departments marked New Year’s Day by administering oaths of office to their new 2024 leaders.Photo Credit: FACEBOOK/FIRE DEPARTMENTS

PublishedJanuary 2, 2024 at 11:41 AM

WOODBRIDGE, NJ — Several of this community’s independent fire departments marked New Year’s Day by administering oaths of office to their new 2024 leaders.

Oaths were administered to fire chiefs and top leadership at Fords Fire Company; the Hopelawn Engine Company; and Keasbey Protection Fire Company.

TAPinto Woodbridge is proud to present readers with photographs from each of those fire departments.

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● Sworn in as officers with Fords Fire Company No. 1 are Chief Howie Bauer; 1st Assistant Chief John Dimitrakis; 2nd Assistant Chief Robert Somes; Captain Eric Pado and 1st Lieutenant Gary Nebus.

● Officers who took oaths with Hopelawn Engine Company, are Chief Michael Walsh; Assistant Chief Nicholas Natale; Captain Jaime Nieves; 1st Lieutenant Brian Turcotte; and 2nd Lieutenant Anthony Natale.

● Sworn in as officers with Keasbey Protection Fire Company No 1 are Chief Luis Montalvo; Deputy Chief Jack Croft; Captain John Manna; and Lieutenant Richard Polidura.

TAPinto Woodbridge will provide more fire department updates as they become available.

ShopRite Named Most-Trusted Supermarket in the Northeast

Keasbey, NJ – The shoppers have spoken! ShopRite is pleased to announce that it has been named the ‘Most Trusted Grocery Retailer in the Northeast’ in a new survey conducted in partnership with Newsweek magazine and the consultancy firm, BrandSpark International.To identify the winners, Newsweek and BrandSpark International surveyed 3,200 U.S. adults nationwide to capture their opinions of grocery stores across the region. Each retailer was judged according to store format and several attributes beli...

Keasbey, NJ – The shoppers have spoken! ShopRite is pleased to announce that it has been named the ‘Most Trusted Grocery Retailer in the Northeast’ in a new survey conducted in partnership with Newsweek magazine and the consultancy firm, BrandSpark International.

To identify the winners, Newsweek and BrandSpark International surveyed 3,200 U.S. adults nationwide to capture their opinions of grocery stores across the region. Each retailer was judged according to store format and several attributes believed to drive trust, including: Quality, fair prices, recommendation, innovation, customer support, values, transparency, and heritage.

ShopRite ranked first in the survey’s Northeast trust category.

“At a time when shoppers have so many choices, we are extremely proud to have been singled out and recognized by our shoppers as their most-trusted supermarket of choice,” said Karen Meleta, Chief Communications Officer representing the ShopRite banner. “As a cooperative of family-owned and operated businesses, gaining the trust of our customers begins with a commitment to providing fresh, quality foods in a shopping environment where our customers feel welcomed and respected. This has been a hallmark of the brand for more than seven decades.”

ShopRite’s approach to customer service begins with a team of knowledgeable associates who are dedicated to caring for customers whether they are shopping online or being served in-store at our full-service meat, bakery, seafood and deli departments. ShopRite addresses even more personalized needs by offering pharmacy and customized dietitian services. This personal touch continues by providing a broad assortment of quality private label and national brand products that meet the unique needs of the communities where the stores are located. “We continue to remain focused on providing exceptional customer service, convenience, quality and value that ‘sparks’ our customers’ confidence and trust in our brand,” noted Meleta.

To see Newsweek’s story and the results of the survey, click here: https://www.newsweek.com/americas-most-trusted-grocery-retailer/top-5-region

For more information, visit ShopRite.com.

About ShopRite

ShopRite is the registered trademark of Wakefern Food Corp., a retailer-owned cooperative based in Keasbey, NJ, and the largest supermarket cooperative in the United States. With nearly 280 ShopRite supermarkets located throughout New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Delaware and Maryland, ShopRite serves millions of customers each week. Through its ShopRite Partners In Caring program, ShopRite is dedicated to fighting hunger in the communities it serves. Since the program began in 1999, ShopRite Partners In Caring has donated $62 million to food banks that support more than 2,200 worthy charities. As a title sponsor of the ShopRite LPGA Classic Presented by Acer, ShopRite has donated $34 million to local organizations, hospitals and community groups. For more information, please visit www.ShopRite.com.

About BrandSpark International

Founded in 2001, BrandSpark International is a research and consulting firm that provides brands with the insights they need to understand the omni-channel shopper, refine their strategic brand positioning, build consumer trust and improve the success of their new product launches. BrandSpark Marketing Services runs major awards programs the Best New Product Awards and the BrandSpark Most Trusted Awards, and leading shopper community and digital promotions platform www.ShopperArmy.com.

Newsweek Media Partnership

BrandSpark has partnered with premier media brand Newsweek to shine a bright light on these award-winning brands. The partnership will include features of the winners, targeted communications to readers and unique high-value advertising opportunities for brands anchored by editorial content. The BrandSpark Most Trusted Awards has updated its highly influential logo to include the iconic and instantly recognizable Newsweek logo to generate even more impact for shoppers and brands.

Keasbey Brownfield Site Moves Closer to Remediation

Phase two of a massive redevelopment project is officially underway in Keasbey following a ribbon-cutting ceremony along the Raritan River Friday morning, Oct. 28.The ribbon-cutting, held deep in the 120 acre site off Riverfront Road, signals the beginning of the second phase of remediation of the environmental wetlands along the river, the largest segment of the Brownfields Development Area in Keasbey.“This site has not been active since 1984,” said Mayor John McCormac of the redevelopment area. “[The Brownfi...

Phase two of a massive redevelopment project is officially underway in Keasbey following a ribbon-cutting ceremony along the Raritan River Friday morning, Oct. 28.

The ribbon-cutting, held deep in the 120 acre site off Riverfront Road, signals the beginning of the second phase of remediation of the environmental wetlands along the river, the largest segment of the Brownfields Development Area in Keasbey.

“This site has not been active since 1984,” said Mayor John McCormac of the redevelopment area. “[The Brownfields Development Area designation] has been a fantastic agreement, it allows us to get direct access to the DEP...and it’s the reason we’re here today.”

When completed, the future Woodbridge Waterfront Park will include boardwalks along the waterfront and upland areas, bird blinds, hiking trails, scenic overlooks, and more. The project will also allow direct public access to the Raritan River waterfront from Woodbridge – a setup that hasn’t been available to Woodbridge residents since the late 1800s.

The first phase of the project began in July. In addition to the Waterfront Park, plans for the former chemical manufacturing site include business and industrial development. Restoration of the area – including the construction of a 7,000 foot long hydraulic barrier wall, excavation and off-site disposal of impacted soil, lead, and pesticide waste material, capping and filling of an impacted pond, and the construction of a soil cap over the areas within the barrier wall that were formerly manufacturing areas – is expected to take three years.

“To see the BDA here and see the process unfold and to start seeing these sites being cleaned up and remediated and also restored, it gives us hope that this great resource that is the Raritan River can be restored in our lifetime,” said Bob Spiegel, President of Edison Wetlands Association, a non-profit organization that began in the late 1980’s with the goal of cleaning up the Raritan River. “This is a great opportunity.”

The site has been undergoing remediation and clean-up since the early 1990s and was designated a Brownfield Development Area in October 2009 by the Department of Environmental Protection. That allowed the township to work on coordinated remediation and redevelopment, while being eligible for grants of up to $5 million each year from the DEP's Hazardous Discharge Site Remediation Fund for investigation and remediation.

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