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 Acupuncturists West Keansburg, NJ

If you're new to holistic healing, acupuncture may seem intimidating. You might be wondering how needles pressed into your skin could possibly make you feel better. Wouldn't someone pushing a needle into your back be painful? As it turns out, acupuncture is far from painful and is quickly becoming one of the most sought-after treatments for chronic pain and for regulating issues relating to:

  • Digestion
  • Hormones
  • Breathing
  • Muscles
  • Nerves & Brain
  • Sex & Libido
  • Body Circulation
  • Organs & Heart

In fact, acupuncture has been studied and practiced for over 2,500 years and, more recently, has been researched and supported by many scientific studies. While acupuncture may not be a "miracle" treatment for every type of pain or condition, it has been shown to be effective in treating a wide range of issues, from depression and allergies to morning sickness and cramps.

Covering the Basics of Acupuncture in West Keansburg, NJ

Acupuncture is a therapy in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) that aims to balance the body's energy, called qi, which flows through pathways called meridians. This balance is crucial for overall wellness, as disruptions to qi can lead to health concerns. According to TCM, inserting small stainless-steel needles into specific points called acupoints along the meridians can help rebalance the flow of qi and restore overall health.

These acupoints are believed to release certain chemicals when stimulated, which can trigger an immune response and promote physiological homeostasis. Recent research suggests that this therapy may help alleviate symptoms of various health ailments.

In fact, the National Institute of Health conducted a survey on complementary health approaches, revealing that acupuncture usage in the United States has increased by 50 percent between 2002 and 2012. As of 2012, 6.4 percent of American adults have reported using acupuncture as a form of treatment.

Acupuncture Near Me West Keansburg, NJ

Is Acupuncture in West Keansburg, NJ Actually Legit?

One of the most common questions from new patients interested in acupuncture typically revolves around whether it really works or whether it's all "new age" malarky. We get it - for most folks, the thought of inserting stainless-steel needles into one's back, arms, or neck sounds loony. However, with the ever-increasing popularity of acupuncture in New Jersey and other locations, numerous studies centering on acupuncture's effectiveness have taken place.

Extensive research has been conducted on the effectiveness of acupuncture for various conditions. A February 2022 analysis published in the BMJ, which evaluated over 2,000 scientific reviews of acupuncture therapies, revealed that acupuncture's efficacy is strongest for:

  • Neck Pain
  • Back Pain
  • Post-Stroke Aphasia
  • Muscle Pain
  • Lactation Issues
  • Lower Back Pain
  • Asthma
  • Allergies
  • Vascular Dementia
  • More

Additionally, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), acupuncture is most effective for pain relief in cases of chronic conditions such as osteoarthritis, lower back pain, and tension headaches. Additionally, a review of 11 clinical trials found that acupuncture may also alleviate symptoms associated with cancer treatment, as noted by the NIH.

What Happens During an Acupuncture Session at New Jersey Sports Spine & Wellness?

When meeting with your acupuncturist for the first time, they will discuss your condition with you before conducting a physical examination to identify areas of your body that might respond to acupuncture. The needles used in acupuncture are incredibly thin, sterile, and disposable, with your acupuncturist inserting them at different depths ranging from a fraction of an inch to several inches.

Acupuncture needles are less painful than medical needles used for vaccines or blood draws. This is because acupuncture needles are thinner and solid, not hollow. During the treatment, you may experience some muscle sensations like dull aches or tingling.

Your practitioner will ask you to report any deep heaviness or numbness, which are positive signs that the treatment is working. Depending on the condition you're treating and the supplemental treatments you're undergoing, like physical therapy, acupuncture needles will remain in place for several minutes or up to 30 minutes.

Once your first acupuncture treatment is finished, it's normal to feel extra relaxed and calm. For that reason, some patients like to arrange for a ride home after their first or second session. With that said, you shouldn't experience much pain at all, and it's quite possible for you to return to work after acupuncture.

How Many Treatments Until Acupuncture Works?

This is another common question that we get at New Jersey Sports Spine & Wellness. The simple answer is, "It depends." While we understand that that's not a satisfying answer for some, it's important to understand that every patient is different. Everyone has different bodies and, by proxy, different bodily conditions and issues that need to be addressed.

During your initial consultation at our office, your licensed acupuncturist will go over your needs and goals as it relates to acupuncture therapy. Once your therapist has a good sense of the scope of your needs, they can give you a loose idea of how many sessions you'll need.

Generally speaking, most patients have appointments once a week. Others may require more or less frequent sessions. It's important to note that the full benefits of acupuncture may not be immediately evident after the first or even the second session. It's common for normal patients to undergo up to five treatments to realize the full benefits of acupuncture.

What Conditions Are Treated with Acupuncture in West Keansburg, NJ?

There's no question that acupuncture is more popular than ever as a non-invasive, non-addictive way to reclaim balance and well-being. But what types of conditions can this traditional therapy help alleviate in the modern world? Advances in acupuncture techniques and applications have resulted in some very promising benefits.

Relief from Chronic Pain

Did you know that regular acupuncture treatments can help reduce the pain associated with osteoarthritis? In May 2017, a meta-analysis was published, which studied approximately 18,000 patients with chronic pain, such as low back, neck, and shoulder pain, knee OA, and headache or migraine. The analysis found that the benefits of acupuncture therapy in reducing pain lasted for more than 12 months.

That's wonderful news for athletes and other people who push their bodies daily to accomplish goals or bring home money for rent and bills. In fact, many medical experts consider acupuncture as a viable option for managing chronic pain in conjunction with traditional methods like physical therapy and chiropractic care. The idea behind this approach is that acupuncture may trigger the body's natural healing response to alleviate pain.

When a licensed acupuncturist in New Jersey inserts an acupuncture needle, it penetrates your fascia, a connective tissue that wraps around your organs and muscles. Like a slight tickle on your arm, your body realizes that something is happening and responds by delivering lymph fluid, blood, and other important nutrients to speed up healing in affected areas like your knees, back, neck, joints, and more.

 Fertility Acupuncture West Keansburg, NJ
 Best Acupuncture West Keansburg, NJ

Migraine Headache Relief

If you're like other people who suffer from migraines, you know that once one of them hits, it can be next to impossible to function properly throughout the day. Fortunately, acupuncture in West Keansburg, NJ may be a viable solution if you have to endure migraines often.

A study conducted in 2009 by the Center for Complementary Medicine at the University of Munich analyzed 11 studies involving 2,137 patients who received acupuncture treatment for chronic tension-type headaches. The researchers concluded that acupuncture could be an effective non-pharmacological solution for frequent headaches.

The study compared the effects of acupuncture sessions with sham acupuncture and no treatment at all. Both groups that received acupuncture treatment, whether needles were placed randomly or strategically, reported a reduction in headache symptoms, while the control group reported no change. The group that received real acupuncture treatment also reported a decrease in the number of headache days and intensity of pain in a follow-up survey.

Improved Sleep

For individuals who struggle with insomnia and other sleep disturbances, acupuncture is a promising therapy. Although sedatives are commonly prescribed for insomnia, long-term use can lead to negative side effects such as dependence and excessive drowsiness.

A study conducted on 72 participants and published in Sleep Medicine in 2017 found that individuals who received acupuncture three times a week for four weeks experienced significant improvements in sleep quality and anxiety compared to those who received sham acupuncture.

Similarly, a review of 30 randomized, controlled trials found that acupuncture was more effective in improving sleep quality and daytime functioning than sham acupuncture.

 Acupuncture Clinic West Keansburg, NJ
 Facial Acupuncture West Keansburg, NJ

Better Recovery from Surgery

While many patients choose acupuncture as a way to avoid surgery altogether, those who need surgery also use it for improved recovery. Because, at the end of the day, recovering from surgery is no easy feat. Patients may experience various symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, pain around the incision, restlessness, sleep troubles, constipation, and sore throat.

According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, healthcare providers may use acupuncture as a way to alleviate some of these symptoms and help with healing. A study published in Integrative Cancer Therapies in January 2017 involving 172 participants found that patients who received acupuncture after surgery reported significant improvements in sleep, anxiety, pain, fatigue, nausea, and drowsiness.

 Acupuncture Treatment West Keansburg, NJ

The Surprising Benefits of Supplementing Physical Therapy with Acupuncture

Did you know that supplementing physical therapy with acupuncture and vice versa can have profoundly beneficial effects for patients in New Jersey and across the country? If you're like most, chances are you didn't.

The truth is that acupuncture and physical therapy have both been proven effective in reducing pain and inflammation. While many people view them as separate methods, combining the two modalities can produce a synergistic effect that enhances pain relief and delivers long-lasting benefits to patients.

Physical therapists work with patients of all ages and abilities, from children to elderly adults, to help them overcome physical limitations and improve their quality of life. At NJ Sports Spine & Wellness, our physical therapists help treat a wide range of conditions, from neck pain and spinal cord injuries to back pain and arthritis.

To effectively reduce pain and treat tissue injury, a combination of acupuncture and physical therapy can be very helpful. Acupuncture helps to reduce inflammation and release muscle tightness and trigger points, allowing the patient to better receive manual therapy or exercise-based physical therapy techniques. In doing so, acupuncture can actually create a window of time that allows your body to respond better to other treatments at New Jersey Sports Spine & Wellness, such as physical therapy and chiropractic care.

There are many benefits of combining physical therapy with acupuncture in West Keansburg, NJ, including the following:

  • Increased Range of Motion
  • More Effective Long-Term Pain Relief
  • Enhanced Tissue Repair & Healing
  • Better Response to Physical Therapy Due to Pain Reduction
  • Less of a Need for Pain Medications
  • Boosted Mood & Energy
  • Better Quality of Life Overall

You may be wondering, "Are there any studies showing these benefits?" As it turns out, there are many. One such study, published on the NIH's website, was conducted on patients suffering from frozen shoulder.

 Acupuncture Therapy West Keansburg, NJ

Patients who received acupuncture experienced a significant reduction in pain, while those who underwent physical therapy saw an improvement in range of motion. However, the best outcome was observed in patients who received a combination of both treatments, with reduced pain, increased their range of motion, and improved quality of life. This study highlights the potential benefits of using acupuncture and physical therapy as complementary treatments for frozen shoulder.

It makes sense, then, that people from all walks of life are combining acupuncture with chiropractic treatments at New Jersey Sports Spine & Wellness, including:

  • Professional Athletes
  • Football Players
  • Soccer Players
  • Baseball Players
  • Construction Workers
  • Landscapers
  • Accountants and People Working Office Jobs
  • Public Officials
  • Police Officers
  • More

Combining Acupuncture with Chiropractic Care for Pain Relief and Wellness

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At New Jersey Sports Spine & Wellness, our doctors, practitioners, occupational therapists, and physical therapist specialize in a range of therapies and treatments. Much like physical therapy and acupuncture, combining chiropractic care with acupuncture therapy gives patients a new way to reclaim their mobility, reduce chronic pain, and maintain a healthy quality of life.

Chiropractic care and acupuncture in West Keansburg, NJ are natural healing practices that don't rely on drugs to improve the body's health. They focus on correcting imbalances in the body's structural and supportive systems, promoting natural healing, and ultimately leading to better health. These practices have a proven track record of helping patients improve their quality of life and overcome physical difficulties.

 Medical Acupuncture West Keansburg, NJ

What are the Benefits of Using Acupuncture with Chiropractic Care?

Integrating chiropractic and acupuncture as a dual-modality treatment offers the most efficient solution for removing blockages from the body, promoting balance, and accelerating healing. Rather than using these treatments sequentially, a combined approach allows for maximum benefits at one time.

Chiropractic targets subluxations in the nervous system through manual adjustments, facilitating the central nervous system to promote healing, while acupuncture removes blockages that may hinder the body's internal balance. Together, these treatments work synergistically to optimize energy flow and restore harmony in the body.

 Cosmetic Acupuncture West Keansburg, NJ
 Cosmetic Acupuncture West Keansburg, NJ

What Conditions Can Be Treated with Acupuncture and Chiropractic Care?

When our physical well-being becomes imbalanced, and our innate healing mechanisms are compromised, illnesses can manifest. The integration of acupuncture and chiropractic practices can effectively address a wide range of health conditions that they individually target, such as:

  • Sports Injuries
  • Headaches
  • Sciatica
  • Lower Back Pain
  • Neck Pain
  • Insomnia
  • Chronic Conditions Like Diabetes
  • More

Curious if combining chiropractic care or physical therapy with acupuncture is right for your body? The best way to find out is to make an appointment at our sports rehab clinic in New Jersey. Once our team of medical professionals has a chance to evaluate your conditions, we can explore the best options to provide the most relief in the shortest amount of time possible.

The Premier Choice for Professional Acupuncture in West Keansburg, NJ

New Jersey Sports Spine & Wellness consists of a team of athletic trainers, chiropractors, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and other professionals. We're very proud and passionate about caring for our patients, many of whom are suffering from debilitating conditions like back and neck pain, plantar fasciitis, sports-related injuries, and more. If you're trying to get on the road to pain relief and recovery, acupuncture may be the non-surgical solution you need to reclaim your life. Contact our office today to learn whether this exciting treatment is right for you.

phone-number732-526-2497

Latest News in West Keansburg, NJ

He's 22, from Keansburg, and doing groundbreaking research about Mars

Michael Flynn graduated college May 9, but he didn’t quite finish. There is one more thing he’s working on, and it’s significant.The Keansburg 22-year-old is studying the atmosphere of Mars and coauthoring a research paper that could impact future exploration of the Red Planet.It's his final project at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida, from which he graduated with distinction after attending on a full scholarship through Army ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training Corps)....

Michael Flynn graduated college May 9, but he didn’t quite finish. There is one more thing he’s working on, and it’s significant.

The Keansburg 22-year-old is studying the atmosphere of Mars and coauthoring a research paper that could impact future exploration of the Red Planet.

It's his final project at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida, from which he graduated with distinction after attending on a full scholarship through Army ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training Corps).

“One of our best students — not only in the classroom but also in his work doing research,” said Embry-Riddle professor John Hughes, chair of the university’s physics department. “To have an undergraduate doing cutting-edge research that’s going to get published, it’s a great thing for the student and something the university can be proud of.”

'Every shade of blue':Ocean Township alum reveals what he saw on Blue Origin space flight

That’s not all. Later this month Flynn is attending the U.S. Army’s "Air and Space Basic Course" at West Point. He is among the first ROTC cadets ever chosen to attend the exclusive two-week event.

Not bad for a kid who grew up curious about the night sky.

Flynn attended high school at Marine Academy of Science and Technology (MAST) on Sandy Hook. There, as at Embry-Riddle, he made the most of his opportunities.

“He has a combination of talent and work ethic, and that’s a really good combination,” Hughes said. “Almost every time I walked into the lab, he was in there working.”

This past semester Flynn was named was Embry-Riddle’s Outstanding Student in Space Physics, his major. He not only posted the major’s highest grade-point average; his collaboration with physics professor Michael Hickey on the Mars project turned more than a few heads.

War of the Worlds:How NJ became the landing spot for a Martian invasion on Mischief Night

Flynn and Hickey are studying the effect the planet’s ferocious sandstorms have on Martian atmosphere. They’re looking at the gravity waves generated when the wind blows across four large mountains, including the gargantuan Olympus Mons. At 72,000 feet high — two-and-a-half times taller than Mount Everest — Olympus Mons is the solar system’s biggest mountain.

They are hoping to publish their findings by summer’s end.

“This is important if we want to travel to Mars, if we want to have satellites over Mars, just understanding the complexities of the atmosphere,” Flynn explained.

Mapping these patters could help scientists anticipate huge fluctuations in temperature, wind speed and atmospheric density. That will be vital for any attempt to send humans to Mars.

'The Farthest':Documentary looks at NASA's Voyager mission

Flynn can envision it.

“I would say, from what I’ve studied, that if you had the right shelter it’s possible,” he said. “There are cases of sandstorms with winds at certain locations that can actually become supersonic (above 760 mph) at specific heights. That could be dangerous. But if you had a strong enough shelter, it could be possible.”

Before that, though, Flynn has some business closer to home.

On May 8, Flynn was commissioned as a second lieutenant. He has a job lined up in the Army’s cyber command. Training begins early next year in Georgia. An internship last summer gave him a glimpse of the work.

“It was really eye-opening,” he said. “I can’t talk about the specifics of everything I saw, but I was able to do a project that involved satellite communication systems and the different ways we can control satellite systems.”

That’s where his heart lies.

“I’m really interested in satellite physics and satellite communication systems,” Flynn said.

The ultimate gig? A post with Army Space Operations, which could be crucial to the nation’s future defense. He must attain the rank of captain in order to apply, so that’s a few years off. For now, he’s building a resume and gaining experience. The upcoming course at West Point will add to it all.

“I am really excited about this opportunity where I can apply what I’ve learned to the Army, and take the knowledge the Army is going to give me and apply that for national defense,” Flynn said. “I feel like I’ve been mostly prepared for it.”

As far as Hughes is concerned, you can take the “mostly” out of that sentiment.

“One thing I’m quite sure of?” the professor said. “He’ll be successful no matter where he ends up.”

Jerry Carino is community columnist for the Asbury Park Press, focusing on the Jersey Shore’s interesting people, inspiring stories and pressing issues. Contact him at jcarino@gannettnj.com.

Some Fun Facts About The History Of North Middletown

Did you know some of Capt. Kidd's men were said to have married Middletown women? Or that farmers shipped produce to NY from the Bayshore?Editor’s Note: This month, Middletown’s Neighborhood Spotlight program is focusing on the North Middletown section of town. Here’s some information about the history of that area, from a news release submitted by Township Spokeswoman Cindy Herrschaft:North Middletown, located in the Bayshore, was known as East Keansburg for nearly 75 years before the name was offici...

Did you know some of Capt. Kidd's men were said to have married Middletown women? Or that farmers shipped produce to NY from the Bayshore?

Editor’s Note: This month, Middletown’s Neighborhood Spotlight program is focusing on the North Middletown section of town. Here’s some information about the history of that area, from a news release submitted by Township Spokeswoman Cindy Herrschaft:

North Middletown, located in the Bayshore, was known as East Keansburg for nearly 75 years before the name was officially changed in 1987. East Keansburg was born in the early 20th century, taking its name from Keansburg, a then-very popular resort town to its west. The earliest use of name dates back to 1914 with a development named East Keansburg Park. It was one of several housing developments taking advantage of a booming summer tourist market along the Bayshore.

Parks in North Middletown include Ideal Beach on Bayside Parkway, Roosevelt Park on Port Monmouth Road, the Tonya Keller Community Center at Bray Avenue and McMahon Park on Albert Avenue. Ideal Beach gets is moniker from Ideal Beach Realty Company, which sold about 1,200 lots in the early 1920s along Raritan Bay. The beachfront was maintained by a civic association of East Keansburg lot owners until a 1927 storm wrecked the boardwalk and flooded much of the beach. The township assumed ownership by ordinance in 1929 with the assistance of state aid. Over the years the beach, which fronts the Raritan Bay, been home to summer fireworks, beauty contests, and family beach parties.

In the 1800s, before its heyday as a summer mecca, North Middletown and the adjacent waterfront was vital link for farmers. Bray’s Landing, located west of Pews Creek, was named for the farmer who owned the land on which a dock was built. While the surrounding land was poor for farming, the Bayshore was at one time was considered to be a good central point farmers to ship produce to market in New York City.

Today visitors will find a free municipal parking lot in the heart of North Middletown’s neighborhood commercial district at intersection of Ocean Avenue and Port Monmouth Road. A Bus Commuter Lot is located at intersection of Route 36 and Thompson Avenue. A permit is required to park in the commuter lot.

Find out what's happening in Middletownwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

North Middletown is also home to the East Keansburg Fire Company located at 214 Thompson Avenue and the Middletown First Aid and Rescue Squad located at 11 Cruise Place.

Legend has it that some of the earliest European visitors to North Middletown were pirates. Back in 1699 pirates purportedly made their ashore headquarters at Bray’s Landing, in the area known today as Ideal Beach. According to old historical accounts, several of Captain Kidd’s men married Middletown women, and after execution of their leader in 1701, made their homes in Middletown. Piracy in those days was considered a reputable profession with important commission by the governments during the colonial wars. From captured Spanish ships the pirates were said to have brought qualities of silks, Spanish laces and other luxuries further inland at Middletown Village.

Photo: Courtesy Middletown Township, Ideal Beach Party

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More from Middletown

20 people indicted as part of Bayshore heroin ring

FREEHOLD -- A Monmouth County grand jury on Monday indicted 20 people as part of a drug distribution network that included several members of the same family who recruited others to package heroin and cocaine flowing through the county's Bayshore area.Four of those indicted are charged with being the leaders of that network, which acting Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher Gramiccioni said sold large quantities of heroin almost daily.Seven others are a...

FREEHOLD -- A Monmouth County grand jury on Monday indicted 20 people as part of a drug distribution network that included several members of the same family who recruited others to package heroin and cocaine flowing through the county's Bayshore area.

Four of those indicted are charged with being the leaders of that network, which acting Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher Gramiccioni said sold large quantities of heroin almost daily.

Seven others are accused of conspiring with the alleged leaders to distribute heroin and cocaine in a network that Gramiccioni said operated out of houses and apartments in Monmouth and Middlesex counties.

RELATED:

Dubbed "Operation Family Tides," the 10-month investigation by several county and local law enforcement agencies revealed the members obtained large quantities of heroin in raw undiluted form and then recruited people to package the opiate for sale primarily in the Cliffwood section of Aberdeen.

The 136-count indictment names Gregory "IA" Moore, 34; Terrence "T9" Brown, 38; Edward "Head" Guttridge II, 30, all of Cliffwood, and Halee Wing, 37, of East Orange, as leaders of the narcotics ring. The four men are charged with leading a narcotics trafficking network, conspiracy, drug possession with intent to distribute and drug distribution.

Those charged as being co-conspirators are Isaiah "Zeke" Edwards, 25, of Old Bridge; Raymond "Hood" Jackson, 30, of Keyport; Bianca Edwards, 22, of Old Bridge; Joseph "Rule" Jackson Jr., 44, of Matawan, Krystal Mell, 26, of Keansburg, Alina Alma, 24, of New York City and James, "King James" Hemenway, 37, of Woodbridge. They were charged with conspiracy, drug possession with intent to distribute and drug distribution. Brown, Isaiah Edwards, Gutridge, Raymond Jackson, Mell and Joseph Jackson, Jr. also face additional drug distribution charges. Additionally, Gutridge and Jessica German, 21, of New York City, were each charged with drug possession.

Members of the operation also sold powder and crack cocaine, Gramiccioni said.

He said the investigation also uncovered two locations - an apartment in Perth Amboy and another apartment in Woodbridge - where heroin and cocaine were processed and packaged.

In the indictment, Gutridge, Wing, Alma, and Timothy Davidson, 38, of Old Bridge, are charged with maintaining or operating a drug production facility, drug possession with intent to distribute in connection with the apartment in Perth Amboy. Hemenway is charged with maintaining or operating a drug production facility and drug possession with intent to distribute related to the Woodbridge apartment, Gramiccioni said.

The indictment also named seven people who are accused of buying drugs from members of the narcotics ring. They were identified as Ryan Murphy, 26, and Taheem Brown, 22, of Cliffwood; Jason Remp, 21, of Hazlet; James Mitchell, 57, Shannon Lecomte 21, and Denise Giuriceo, 41, of Keansburg and Christine Owens, 44, of the West Keansburg section of Hazlet. They are charged with drug possession and conspiracy to possess drugs.

Soon Hazlet residents will enjoy $1.5 million revitalization of 8th Street Park

Photo Credit: File Photo By Jeanne Wall PublishedApril 29, 2023 at 1:56 AMHAZLET, NJ: The ground is broken for the revitalization of the 8th Street Park! Last Tuesday, officials displayed the much anticipated "ceremonial dig" for the $1.5 million revitalization of 8th Street Park in the West Keansburg section of Hazlet Township.In attendance for the groundbreaking were members of the Hazlet Township Committee and representatives of the D...

Photo Credit: File Photo

By Jeanne Wall

PublishedApril 29, 2023 at 1:56 AM

HAZLET, NJ: The ground is broken for the revitalization of the 8th Street Park! Last Tuesday, officials displayed the much anticipated "ceremonial dig" for the $1.5 million revitalization of 8th Street Park in the West Keansburg section of Hazlet Township.

In attendance for the groundbreaking were members of the Hazlet Township Committee and representatives of the Dept. of Public Works, Recreation, Open Space Advisory Council and Monmouth County Board of County Commissioners.

“Turning this underutilized site into a new park, playground and exercise path will bring joy to residents and help us move toward a vision of creating continuous corridors of open space through our township." said Mayor Michael Sachs.

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The project includes the construction of an inclusive playground, an all-purpose court, a basketball court, walking path, benches, trees and more parking to provide visitors with improved access to the 3.75 acre park. Construction of the park is expected to be completed by September. The transformation of 8th Street Park builds on the goals of the Monmouth County Municipal Park Improvement Grant Program to develop expand and improve recreation opportunities, especially in overburdened communities.

“Across Hazlet, we’re working to bring new life to our parks and recreation centers for Hazlet residents, and 8th Street Park will be the latest, but not the last project we undertake,” said Township Administrator Rob Bengivenga. Hazlet is grateful to the Monmouth County Commissioners for selecting our plan for a matching Open Space Grant providing $250,000 toward this project, and to the NJ DEP for awarding us a $600,000 low interest rate Green Acres Loan.”

The community and township officials have been strategically planning for the park's revitalization since 2021.

"The groundbreaking is an exciting moment for Hazlet Township,” said Joseph Pobega, chairman of the Open Space Advisory Council. “The rehabilitated park will be an excellent asset to the neighborhood and brings us closer to achieving key goals in the Hazlet 2030 Vision Plan: to link parks and provide opportunities for public enjoyment through active and passive recreation."

According to the township, much of the cost for new park amentities are being funded by the Hazlet Township Open Space Trust Fund which allows for improvements to open space.”

“We are grateful to the Monmouth County Parks Commissioners for awarding Hazlet the Municipal Open Space Grant and thank the township’s Open Space Advisory Council for their work in making this project happen,” said Deputy Mayor Peter Terranova. “I also wish to thank the countless Hazlet citizens who gave input. We could not have done it without them.”

According to a press release, the plan was developed with community support from West Keansburg neighborhood stakeholders through visioning sessions. Township children were surveyed about their preference on playground features. A $1.5 million bond ordinance to provide financing for the construction of the park was approved in July, 2022 by Hazlet’s government. T&M Engineering is overseeing the construction of the park, which will be completed by September, 2023. The park is currently closed for construction work. For more about the project, view the 8th Street Park Improvement Update page on the township website.

Is This Tilton's Corner? "Kingsburg"? Where Am I?

For those who haven't been following us up until this point, this post originally appeared as part of Fresh Nest Blog, a log of the life and times of my wife and I as we moved to and bought a house in Hazlet, NJ. We've been documenting the process as we've been trying to bring our home into this century and learning about a locale that is new to the both of us.In this multi-part post we will examine the history of our area and the sometimes con...

For those who haven't been following us up until this point, this post originally appeared as part of Fresh Nest Blog, a log of the life and times of my wife and I as we moved to and bought a house in Hazlet, NJ. We've been documenting the process as we've been trying to bring our home into this century and learning about a locale that is new to the both of us.

In this multi-part post we will examine the history of our area and the sometimes conflicting stories we've heard about our house.

We have been told a lot of different things about the origins of our house in the past year. We've been told the house was built from military housing lumber, we've been told it was the first house on the street, we've been told it was built in 1952, 1953, and even the 1940's. I'm beginning to question these facts and I'm beginning to wonder what the real story is.

From what I know, our house is in Hazlet Township, our mailing address is West Keansburg (although we aren't part of West Keansburg or Keansburg) and the area was at some point in the past known as Tilton's Corner. This name only shows up in the 1930 US Geological Survey, and on an old topographical map. Beyond that, a present day internet search for "Tilton's Corner" sends you to Wall Township.

The local dialect seems to sometimes pronounce the town "Kingsburg". However illogical that sounds on paper, it turns out that at some point in our history that may have been accepted. According to the first NJ state topographical study, performed by C.C. Vermeule from around 1870 to 1887 the area was, in fact, known as Kingsburg. Take that with a grain of salt. This is the 1870's and 80's we're talking about here. Except for a few typos on the internet I can't find any solid evidence that the area was ever called Kingsburg. Nowhere in my travels, including John Kean's biography, for whom the town is named, and the town historical society website, can I find a clear path to "Kingsburg".

Find out what's happening in Holmdel-Hazletwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

Our neighborhood was farms "as far as the eye could see" until the middle of the century. The last farm disappeared in the 1980's and was replaced with some single family homes. According to our deed and records the neighborhood was first divided into blocks in the late 1940's and early 1950's. The town of Hazlet changed its name from "Raritan" to "Hazlet" and the town experienced significant growth in the 1960's.

There isn't any info online about "The Keansburg Development Company, Inc" that divided and sold the lots but our deed shows that they did in fact divide and publish a map with the Monmouth County Clerk's Office on August 31st 1950. So that means our house could not have been built before 1950. That's at least one mystery solved.

Does anyone have any ideas about why it would've been called "Kingsburg" for a few decades, or what exactly the "Keansburg Development Company Inc" did? Maybe someone knows why it was called Tilton's Corner. Is it related to the Tilton's Corner in Wall, or is that purely coincidental?

That's all for now. Look out for part two of this multi-part post about our house's history.

Photos taken by Andrew Baker. Maps and images were pulled from Historic Aerials , the NJ DEP and USGS.

He's 22, from Keansburg, and doing groundbreaking research about Mars

Michael Flynn graduated college May 9, but he didn’t quite finish. There is one more thing he’s working on, and it’s significant.The Keansburg 22-year-old is studying the atmosphere of Mars and coauthoring a research paper that could impact future exploration of the Red Planet.It's his final project at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida, from which he graduated with distinction after attending on a full scholarship through Army ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training Corps)....

Michael Flynn graduated college May 9, but he didn’t quite finish. There is one more thing he’s working on, and it’s significant.

The Keansburg 22-year-old is studying the atmosphere of Mars and coauthoring a research paper that could impact future exploration of the Red Planet.

It's his final project at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Florida, from which he graduated with distinction after attending on a full scholarship through Army ROTC (Reserve Officers' Training Corps).

“One of our best students — not only in the classroom but also in his work doing research,” said Embry-Riddle professor John Hughes, chair of the university’s physics department. “To have an undergraduate doing cutting-edge research that’s going to get published, it’s a great thing for the student and something the university can be proud of.”

'Every shade of blue':Ocean Township alum reveals what he saw on Blue Origin space flight

That’s not all. Later this month Flynn is attending the U.S. Army’s "Air and Space Basic Course" at West Point. He is among the first ROTC cadets ever chosen to attend the exclusive two-week event.

Not bad for a kid who grew up curious about the night sky.

Flynn attended high school at Marine Academy of Science and Technology (MAST) on Sandy Hook. There, as at Embry-Riddle, he made the most of his opportunities.

“He has a combination of talent and work ethic, and that’s a really good combination,” Hughes said. “Almost every time I walked into the lab, he was in there working.”

This past semester Flynn was named was Embry-Riddle’s Outstanding Student in Space Physics, his major. He not only posted the major’s highest grade-point average; his collaboration with physics professor Michael Hickey on the Mars project turned more than a few heads.

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Flynn and Hickey are studying the effect the planet’s ferocious sandstorms have on Martian atmosphere. They’re looking at the gravity waves generated when the wind blows across four large mountains, including the gargantuan Olympus Mons. At 72,000 feet high — two-and-a-half times taller than Mount Everest — Olympus Mons is the solar system’s biggest mountain.

They are hoping to publish their findings by summer’s end.

“This is important if we want to travel to Mars, if we want to have satellites over Mars, just understanding the complexities of the atmosphere,” Flynn explained.

Mapping these patters could help scientists anticipate huge fluctuations in temperature, wind speed and atmospheric density. That will be vital for any attempt to send humans to Mars.

'The Farthest':Documentary looks at NASA's Voyager mission

Flynn can envision it.

“I would say, from what I’ve studied, that if you had the right shelter it’s possible,” he said. “There are cases of sandstorms with winds at certain locations that can actually become supersonic (above 760 mph) at specific heights. That could be dangerous. But if you had a strong enough shelter, it could be possible.”

Before that, though, Flynn has some business closer to home.

On May 8, Flynn was commissioned as a second lieutenant. He has a job lined up in the Army’s cyber command. Training begins early next year in Georgia. An internship last summer gave him a glimpse of the work.

“It was really eye-opening,” he said. “I can’t talk about the specifics of everything I saw, but I was able to do a project that involved satellite communication systems and the different ways we can control satellite systems.”

That’s where his heart lies.

“I’m really interested in satellite physics and satellite communication systems,” Flynn said.

The ultimate gig? A post with Army Space Operations, which could be crucial to the nation’s future defense. He must attain the rank of captain in order to apply, so that’s a few years off. For now, he’s building a resume and gaining experience. The upcoming course at West Point will add to it all.

“I am really excited about this opportunity where I can apply what I’ve learned to the Army, and take the knowledge the Army is going to give me and apply that for national defense,” Flynn said. “I feel like I’ve been mostly prepared for it.”

As far as Hughes is concerned, you can take the “mostly” out of that sentiment.

“One thing I’m quite sure of?” the professor said. “He’ll be successful no matter where he ends up.”

Jerry Carino is community columnist for the Asbury Park Press, focusing on the Jersey Shore’s interesting people, inspiring stories and pressing issues. Contact him at jcarino@gannettnj.com.

Some Fun Facts About The History Of North Middletown

Did you know some of Capt. Kidd's men were said to have married Middletown women? Or that farmers shipped produce to NY from the Bayshore?Editor’s Note: This month, Middletown’s Neighborhood Spotlight program is focusing on the North Middletown section of town. Here’s some information about the history of that area, from a news release submitted by Township Spokeswoman Cindy Herrschaft:North Middletown, located in the Bayshore, was known as East Keansburg for nearly 75 years before the name was offici...

Did you know some of Capt. Kidd's men were said to have married Middletown women? Or that farmers shipped produce to NY from the Bayshore?

Editor’s Note: This month, Middletown’s Neighborhood Spotlight program is focusing on the North Middletown section of town. Here’s some information about the history of that area, from a news release submitted by Township Spokeswoman Cindy Herrschaft:

North Middletown, located in the Bayshore, was known as East Keansburg for nearly 75 years before the name was officially changed in 1987. East Keansburg was born in the early 20th century, taking its name from Keansburg, a then-very popular resort town to its west. The earliest use of name dates back to 1914 with a development named East Keansburg Park. It was one of several housing developments taking advantage of a booming summer tourist market along the Bayshore.

Parks in North Middletown include Ideal Beach on Bayside Parkway, Roosevelt Park on Port Monmouth Road, the Tonya Keller Community Center at Bray Avenue and McMahon Park on Albert Avenue. Ideal Beach gets is moniker from Ideal Beach Realty Company, which sold about 1,200 lots in the early 1920s along Raritan Bay. The beachfront was maintained by a civic association of East Keansburg lot owners until a 1927 storm wrecked the boardwalk and flooded much of the beach. The township assumed ownership by ordinance in 1929 with the assistance of state aid. Over the years the beach, which fronts the Raritan Bay, been home to summer fireworks, beauty contests, and family beach parties.

In the 1800s, before its heyday as a summer mecca, North Middletown and the adjacent waterfront was vital link for farmers. Bray’s Landing, located west of Pews Creek, was named for the farmer who owned the land on which a dock was built. While the surrounding land was poor for farming, the Bayshore was at one time was considered to be a good central point farmers to ship produce to market in New York City.

Today visitors will find a free municipal parking lot in the heart of North Middletown’s neighborhood commercial district at intersection of Ocean Avenue and Port Monmouth Road. A Bus Commuter Lot is located at intersection of Route 36 and Thompson Avenue. A permit is required to park in the commuter lot.

Find out what's happening in Middletownwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

North Middletown is also home to the East Keansburg Fire Company located at 214 Thompson Avenue and the Middletown First Aid and Rescue Squad located at 11 Cruise Place.

Legend has it that some of the earliest European visitors to North Middletown were pirates. Back in 1699 pirates purportedly made their ashore headquarters at Bray’s Landing, in the area known today as Ideal Beach. According to old historical accounts, several of Captain Kidd’s men married Middletown women, and after execution of their leader in 1701, made their homes in Middletown. Piracy in those days was considered a reputable profession with important commission by the governments during the colonial wars. From captured Spanish ships the pirates were said to have brought qualities of silks, Spanish laces and other luxuries further inland at Middletown Village.

Photo: Courtesy Middletown Township, Ideal Beach Party

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20 people indicted as part of Bayshore heroin ring

FREEHOLD -- A Monmouth County grand jury on Monday indicted 20 people as part of a drug distribution network that included several members of the same family who recruited others to package heroin and cocaine flowing through the county's Bayshore area.Four of those indicted are charged with being the leaders of that network, which acting Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher Gramiccioni said sold large quantities of heroin almost daily.Seven others are a...

FREEHOLD -- A Monmouth County grand jury on Monday indicted 20 people as part of a drug distribution network that included several members of the same family who recruited others to package heroin and cocaine flowing through the county's Bayshore area.

Four of those indicted are charged with being the leaders of that network, which acting Monmouth County Prosecutor Christopher Gramiccioni said sold large quantities of heroin almost daily.

Seven others are accused of conspiring with the alleged leaders to distribute heroin and cocaine in a network that Gramiccioni said operated out of houses and apartments in Monmouth and Middlesex counties.

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Dubbed "Operation Family Tides," the 10-month investigation by several county and local law enforcement agencies revealed the members obtained large quantities of heroin in raw undiluted form and then recruited people to package the opiate for sale primarily in the Cliffwood section of Aberdeen.

The 136-count indictment names Gregory "IA" Moore, 34; Terrence "T9" Brown, 38; Edward "Head" Guttridge II, 30, all of Cliffwood, and Halee Wing, 37, of East Orange, as leaders of the narcotics ring. The four men are charged with leading a narcotics trafficking network, conspiracy, drug possession with intent to distribute and drug distribution.

Those charged as being co-conspirators are Isaiah "Zeke" Edwards, 25, of Old Bridge; Raymond "Hood" Jackson, 30, of Keyport; Bianca Edwards, 22, of Old Bridge; Joseph "Rule" Jackson Jr., 44, of Matawan, Krystal Mell, 26, of Keansburg, Alina Alma, 24, of New York City and James, "King James" Hemenway, 37, of Woodbridge. They were charged with conspiracy, drug possession with intent to distribute and drug distribution. Brown, Isaiah Edwards, Gutridge, Raymond Jackson, Mell and Joseph Jackson, Jr. also face additional drug distribution charges. Additionally, Gutridge and Jessica German, 21, of New York City, were each charged with drug possession.

Members of the operation also sold powder and crack cocaine, Gramiccioni said.

He said the investigation also uncovered two locations - an apartment in Perth Amboy and another apartment in Woodbridge - where heroin and cocaine were processed and packaged.

In the indictment, Gutridge, Wing, Alma, and Timothy Davidson, 38, of Old Bridge, are charged with maintaining or operating a drug production facility, drug possession with intent to distribute in connection with the apartment in Perth Amboy. Hemenway is charged with maintaining or operating a drug production facility and drug possession with intent to distribute related to the Woodbridge apartment, Gramiccioni said.

The indictment also named seven people who are accused of buying drugs from members of the narcotics ring. They were identified as Ryan Murphy, 26, and Taheem Brown, 22, of Cliffwood; Jason Remp, 21, of Hazlet; James Mitchell, 57, Shannon Lecomte 21, and Denise Giuriceo, 41, of Keansburg and Christine Owens, 44, of the West Keansburg section of Hazlet. They are charged with drug possession and conspiracy to possess drugs.

Is This Tilton's Corner? "Kingsburg"? Where Am I?

For those who haven't been following us up until this point, this post originally appeared as part of Fresh Nest Blog, a log of the life and times of my wife and I as we moved to and bought a house in Hazlet, NJ. We've been documenting the process as we've been trying to bring our home into this century and learning about a locale that is new to the both of us.In this multi-part post we will examine the history of our area and the sometimes con...

For those who haven't been following us up until this point, this post originally appeared as part of Fresh Nest Blog, a log of the life and times of my wife and I as we moved to and bought a house in Hazlet, NJ. We've been documenting the process as we've been trying to bring our home into this century and learning about a locale that is new to the both of us.

In this multi-part post we will examine the history of our area and the sometimes conflicting stories we've heard about our house.

We have been told a lot of different things about the origins of our house in the past year. We've been told the house was built from military housing lumber, we've been told it was the first house on the street, we've been told it was built in 1952, 1953, and even the 1940's. I'm beginning to question these facts and I'm beginning to wonder what the real story is.

From what I know, our house is in Hazlet Township, our mailing address is West Keansburg (although we aren't part of West Keansburg or Keansburg) and the area was at some point in the past known as Tilton's Corner. This name only shows up in the 1930 US Geological Survey, and on an old topographical map. Beyond that, a present day internet search for "Tilton's Corner" sends you to Wall Township.

The local dialect seems to sometimes pronounce the town "Kingsburg". However illogical that sounds on paper, it turns out that at some point in our history that may have been accepted. According to the first NJ state topographical study, performed by C.C. Vermeule from around 1870 to 1887 the area was, in fact, known as Kingsburg. Take that with a grain of salt. This is the 1870's and 80's we're talking about here. Except for a few typos on the internet I can't find any solid evidence that the area was ever called Kingsburg. Nowhere in my travels, including John Kean's biography, for whom the town is named, and the town historical society website, can I find a clear path to "Kingsburg".

Find out what's happening in Holmdel-Hazletwith free, real-time updates from Patch.

Our neighborhood was farms "as far as the eye could see" until the middle of the century. The last farm disappeared in the 1980's and was replaced with some single family homes. According to our deed and records the neighborhood was first divided into blocks in the late 1940's and early 1950's. The town of Hazlet changed its name from "Raritan" to "Hazlet" and the town experienced significant growth in the 1960's.

There isn't any info online about "The Keansburg Development Company, Inc" that divided and sold the lots but our deed shows that they did in fact divide and publish a map with the Monmouth County Clerk's Office on August 31st 1950. So that means our house could not have been built before 1950. That's at least one mystery solved.

Does anyone have any ideas about why it would've been called "Kingsburg" for a few decades, or what exactly the "Keansburg Development Company Inc" did? Maybe someone knows why it was called Tilton's Corner. Is it related to the Tilton's Corner in Wall, or is that purely coincidental?

That's all for now. Look out for part two of this multi-part post about our house's history.

Photos taken by Andrew Baker. Maps and images were pulled from Historic Aerials , the NJ DEP and USGS.

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